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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Jelle J. ten Hoeve
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Jelle Ten Hoeve wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article A conditional piggyBac transposition system for genetic screening in mice identifies oncogenic networks in pancreatic cancer. 2015

Rad, Roland / Rad, Lena / Wang, Wei / Strong, Alexander / Ponstingl, Hannes / Bronner, Iraad F / Mayho, Matthew / Steiger, Katja / Weber, Julia / Hieber, Maren / Veltkamp, Christian / Eser, Stefan / Geumann, Ulf / Öllinger, Rupert / Zukowska, Magdalena / Barenboim, Maxim / Maresch, Roman / Cadiñanos, Juan / Friedrich, Mathias / Varela, Ignacio / Constantino-Casas, Fernando / Sarver, Aaron / Ten Hoeve, Jelle / Prosser, Haydn / Seidler, Barbara / Bauer, Judith / Heikenwälder, Mathias / Metzakopian, Emmanouil / Krug, Anne / Ehmer, Ursula / Schneider, Günter / Knösel, Thomas / Rümmele, Petra / Aust, Daniela / Grützmann, Robert / Pilarsky, Christian / Ning, Zemin / Wessels, Lodewyk / Schmid, Roland M / Quail, Michael A / Vassiliou, George / Esposito, Irene / Liu, Pentao / Saur, Dieter / Bradley, Allan. ·1] Department of Medicine II, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, München, Germany. [2] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [3] The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, UK. · The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, UK. · Department of Pathology, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, München, Germany. · 1] Department of Medicine II, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, München, Germany. [2] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, München, Germany. · Instituto de Medicina Oncológica y Molecular de Asturias (IMOMA), Oviedo, Spain. · Instituto de Biomedicina y Biotecnología de Cantabria (UC-CSIC-SODERCAN), Santander, Spain. · Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Bioinformatics and Statistics, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Institute of Virology, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Ludwig Maximilians Universität München, München, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Universität Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Medizinische Universität Insbruck, Insbruck, Austria. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #25485836.

ABSTRACT: Here we describe a conditional piggyBac transposition system in mice and report the discovery of large sets of new cancer genes through a pancreatic insertional mutagenesis screen. We identify Foxp1 as an oncogenic transcription factor that drives pancreatic cancer invasion and spread in a mouse model and correlates with lymph node metastasis in human patients with pancreatic cancer. The propensity of piggyBac for open chromatin also enabled genome-wide screening for cancer-relevant noncoding DNA, which pinpointed a Cdkn2a cis-regulatory region. Histologically, we observed different tumor subentities and discovered associated genetic events, including Fign insertions in hepatoid pancreatic cancer. Our studies demonstrate the power of genetic screening to discover cancer drivers that are difficult to identify by other approaches to cancer genome analysis, such as downstream targets of commonly mutated human cancer genes. These piggyBac resources are universally applicable in any tissue context and provide unique experimental access to the genetic complexity of cancer.

2 Article The deubiquitinase USP9X suppresses pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2012

Pérez-Mancera, Pedro A / Rust, Alistair G / van der Weyden, Louise / Kristiansen, Glen / Li, Allen / Sarver, Aaron L / Silverstein, Kevin A T / Grützmann, Robert / Aust, Daniela / Rümmele, Petra / Knösel, Thomas / Herd, Colin / Stemple, Derek L / Kettleborough, Ross / Brosnan, Jacqueline A / Li, Ang / Morgan, Richard / Knight, Spencer / Yu, Jun / Stegeman, Shane / Collier, Lara S / ten Hoeve, Jelle J / de Ridder, Jeroen / Klein, Alison P / Goggins, Michael / Hruban, Ralph H / Chang, David K / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M / Anonymous31051 / Wessels, Lodewyk F A / Wood, Stephen A / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Pilarsky, Christian / Largaespada, David A / Adams, David J / Tuveson, David A. ·Li Ka Shing Centre, Cambridge Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, Cambridge CB2 0RE, UK. ·Nature · Pubmed #22699621.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) remains a lethal malignancy despite much progress concerning its molecular characterization. PDA tumours harbour four signature somatic mutations in addition to numerous lower frequency genetic events of uncertain significance. Here we use Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis in a mouse model of pancreatic ductal preneoplasia to identify genes that cooperate with oncogenic Kras(G12D) to accelerate tumorigenesis and promote progression. Our screen revealed new candidate genes for PDA and confirmed the importance of many genes and pathways previously implicated in human PDA. The most commonly mutated gene was the X-linked deubiquitinase Usp9x, which was inactivated in over 50% of the tumours. Although previous work had attributed a pro-survival role to USP9X in human neoplasia, we found instead that loss of Usp9x enhances transformation and protects pancreatic cancer cells from anoikis. Clinically, low USP9X protein and messenger RNA expression in PDA correlates with poor survival after surgery, and USP9X levels are inversely associated with metastatic burden in advanced disease. Furthermore, chromatin modulation with trichostatin A or 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine elevates USP9X expression in human PDA cell lines, indicating a clinical approach for certain patients. The conditional deletion of Usp9x cooperated with Kras(G12D) to accelerate pancreatic tumorigenesis in mice, validating their genetic interaction. We propose that USP9X is a major tumour suppressor gene with prognostic and therapeutic relevance in PDA.