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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Giovanni Tallini
Based on 12 articles published since 2010
(Why 12 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Giovanni Tallini wrote the following 12 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Team work and cytopathology molecular diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions. 2017

Fabbri, Carlo / Gibiino, Giulia / Fornelli, Adele / Cennamo, Vincenzo / Grifoni, Daniela / Visani, Michela / Acquaviva, Giorgia / Fassan, Matteo / Fiorino, Sirio / Giovanelli, Silvia / Bassi, Marco / Ghersi, Stefania / Tallini, Giovanni / Jovine, Elio / Gasbarrini, Antonio / de Biase, Dario. ·Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, AUSL Bologna Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, Italy. · Medical Pathology, Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology Division, Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · Anatomic Pathology Unit, AUSL of Bologna, Maggiore Hospital, Italy. · Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology (FaBiT), University of Bologna, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMES), Molecular Diagnostic Unit AUSL of Bologna, University of Bologna School of Medicine, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Anatomic Pathology, University of Padua, Padova, Italy. · Internal Medicine Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Dig Endosc · Pubmed #28190274.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer-associated death in the next decade or so. It is widely accepted that tumorigenesis is linked to specific alterations in key genes and pancreatic neoplasms are some of the best characterized at the genomic level. Recent whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing analyses confirmed that PDAC is frequently characterized by mutations in a set of four genes among others: KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A/p16, and SMAD4. Sequencing, for example, is the preferable technique available for detecting KRAS mutations, whereas in situ immunochemistry is the main approach for detecting TP53 gene alteration. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of PDAC is still a clinical challenge, involving adequate acquisition of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and specific pathological assessment from tissue architecture to specific biomolecular tests. The aim of the present review is to provide a complete overview of the current knowledge of the biology of pancreatic cancer as detected by the latest biomolecular techniques and, moreover, to propose a paradigm for strict teamwork collaboration in order to improve the correct use of diagnostic sources.

2 Review Unusual Thyroid Carcinoma Metastases: a Case Series and Literature Review. 2016

Farina, Eleonora / Monari, Fabio / Tallini, Giovanni / Repaci, Andrea / Mazzarotto, Renzo / Giunchi, Francesca / Panzacchi, Riccardo / Cammelli, Silvia / Padula, Gilbert D A / Deodato, Francesco / Pasquali, Renato / Fanti, Stefano / Fiorentino, Michelangelo / Morganti, Alessio G. ·Radiation Oncology Center, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine-DIMES, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40135, Bologna, Italy. · Radiation Oncology Center, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine-DIMES, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40135, Bologna, Italy. rt.unibo@gmail.com. · Anatomic Pathology, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine-DIMES, Bellaria Hospital, University of Bologna, Via Altura 3, 40139, Bologna, Italy. · Division of Endocrinology, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40135, Bologna, Italy. · Radiotherapy Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata, Ospedale Civile Maggiore, Piazzale Aristide Stefani 1, Verona, Italy. · Pathology Unit of the "F. Addarii" Institute of Oncology, Department of Oncology and Hematology, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40135, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40135, Bologna, Italy. · Radiation Oncology Department, The Lacks Cancer Center, Saint Mary's Health Care, 250 Cherry St SE, Grand Rapids, MI, 49503, USA. · Radiation Oncology Unit, Fondazione "Giovanni Paolo II", Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Largo Agostino Gemelli, 1, 86100, Campobasso, Italy. · Nuclear Medicine Unit, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40135, Bologna, Italy. ·Endocr Pathol · Pubmed #26662609.

ABSTRACT: The most common sites of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer are the neck lymph nodes, while distant metastases typically involve the lungs, the bones, and less frequently the brain. Uncommon metastatic sites include the liver, adrenal gland, kidney, pancreas, and skin. The epidemiological aspects of thyroid metastases in rare sites are largely unknown and their identification could have a significant impact on patients management. A mini-series of unusual metastatic sites of thyroid carcinoma is proposed as a contribution to current knowledge on anatomopathological characteristics and clinical outcome. Of the six cases that were assessed, the metastases were the following: skin metastases (2), skin and pancreas metastases (1), renal metastasis (1), adrenal metastasis (1), and liver metastasis (1). In our experience, metastases in rare sites do not always represent a negative prognostic factor for disease outcome. In fact they can occur as single distant lesion and if surgically resectable, their treatment can also lead to local disease remission.

3 Review Contribution of microRNA analysis to characterisation of pancreatic lesions: a review. 2015

Visani, Michela / Acquaviva, Giorgia / Fiorino, Sirio / Bacchi Reggiani, Maria Letizia / Masetti, Michele / Franceschi, Enrico / Fornelli, Adele / Jovine, Elio / Fabbri, Carlo / Brandes, Alba A / Tallini, Giovanni / Pession, Annalisa / de Biase, Dario. ·Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Operative Unit of Medicine, Budrio Hospital, Budrio, Italy. · Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, Cardiology Unit, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Surgery Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Medical Oncology Department, Bellaria Hospital, Azienda USL/ IRCCS Institute of Neurological Sciences, Bologna, Italy. · Anatomic Pathology Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Endoscopy Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. ·J Clin Pathol · Pubmed #26314585.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic tumours are usually very aggressive cancer with a poor prognosis. A limitation of pancreatic imaging techniques is that lesions are often of ambiguous relevance. The inability to achieve a definitive diagnosis based on cytological evaluation of specimens, due to sampling error, paucicellular samples or coexisting inflammation, might lead to delay in clinical management. Given the morbidity associated with pancreatectomy, a proper selection of patients for surgery is fundamental. Many studies have been conducted in order to identify specific markers that could support the early diagnosis of pancreatic lesions, but, to date, none of them allow to diagnose pancreatic cancer with high sensitivity and specificity. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small non-coding RNAs (19-25 nucleotides) that regulate gene expression interacting with mRNA targets. It is now established that each tissue shows a characteristic miRNA expression pattern that could be modified in association with a number of different diseases including neoplasia. Due to their key role in the regulation of gene expression, in the last years several studies have investigated miRNA tissue-specific expression, quantification and functional analysis to understand their peculiar involvement in cellular processes. The aim of this review is to focus on miRNA expression in pancreatic cancer and their putative role in early characterisation of pancreatic lesions.

4 Review Tensegrity model hypothesis: may this paradigm be useful to explain hepatic and pancreatic carcinogenesis in patients with persistent hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus infection? 2014

Fiorino, Sirio / Bacchi-Reggiani, Letizia / Pontoriero, Laura / Gallo, Claudio / Chili, Elisabetta / Masetti, Michele / Zanini, Nicola / Grondona, Ana / Silvestri, Tania / Deleonardi, Gaia / Fornelli, Adele / Bondi, Arrigo / de Biase, Dario / Baccarini, Paola / Tallini, Giovanni / Tropeano, Antonio / Quartuccio, Valeria / Cuppini, Andrea / Castellani, Gastone / Jovine, Elio. ·Unit of Internal Medicine, Hospital of Budrio. Budrio, BO, Italy. sirio.fiorino@ausl.bologna.it. ·JOP · Pubmed #24618442.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) possess well-known oncogenic properties and may promote carcinogenesis in liver. However antigens and replicative sequences of HBV/HCV have been also detected in different extra-hepatic tissues, including the pancreas. Although epidemiological studies and meta-analyses have recently suggested that HBV/HCV may be also risk factors for pancreatic cancer and several researches have investigated the possible mechanisms and intra-/extra-cellular paths involved in pancreatic and hepatic carcinogenesis, to date, these complex processes remain largely unexplained. OBJECTIVES: In our paper, we aimed to propose a comprehensive and qualitative hypothetical model, describing how HBV/HCV may exert their oncogenic role. METHODS: We performed a systematic research of scientific literature, by searching MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE databases. The used keywords were: "chronic HBV/HCV", "pancreatic cancer", "liver carcinoma", "carcinogenesis mechanisms", "tensional integrity", "cytoskeleton", and "extracellular matrix". RESULTS: Taking advantage from available studies, we suggest an unifying hypothesis based on results and data, obtained from different areas of research. In particular we considered the well-defined model of tensional integrity and correlated it to changes induced by HBV/HCV in viscoelastic properties/stiffness of cellular/extracellular microenvironments. These events perturb the tightly-regulated feedback loop, which usually couples the intracellular-generated forces to substrate rigidity of extracellular compartments. Therefore, such a change strongly affects intracellular functions and cellular fate, by promoting a substantial deregulation of critical intracellular biochemical activities and genome expression. CONCLUSIONS: Our hypothesis might provide for the first time a reliable system, which correlates tensional integrity model with intra-/extra-cellular modifications, occurring in liver and pancreas during HBV/HCV-induced carcinogenesis. This approach might improve our understanding of pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the development of pancreatic and hepatic carcinogenesis , enhancing the possibility of their treatment. Furthermore, should the usefulness of this model be definitively confirmed, it might be also helpful to extend its field of application to other viruses-related cancers.

5 Article Concordance, intra- and inter-observer agreements between light microscopy and whole slide imaging for samples acquired by EUS in pancreatic solid lesions. 2019

Larghi, Alberto / Fornelli, Adele / Lega, Stefania / Ragazzi, Moira / Carlinfante, Gabriele / Baccarini, Paola / Fabbri, Carlo / Pierotti, Paola / Tallini, Giovanni / Bondi, Arrigo / de Biase, Dario. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Foundation University Hospital Policlinico A. Gemelli IRCCS, CERTT, Center for Endoscopic Research Therapeutics and Training, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Pathology Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. Electronic address: adele.fornelli@ausl.bologna.it. · Pathology Unit, Ospedale Vecchio, Imola, Italy. · Pathology Unit, S. Maria Nuova Hospital, IRCSS-AUSL Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Pathology Unit, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Digestive Endoscopy and Gastroenterology, Forlì and Cesena Hospitals, Italy. · Pathology Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Anatomical Pathology, Molecular Diagnostic Unit, University of Bologna School of Medicine, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, Molecular Diagnostic Unit, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #31147212.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: No study has compared the performance of light microscopy (LM) and whole slide imaging (WSI) for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) histological acquired tissue samples from pancreatic solid lesions (PSLs). We evaluated the concordance between LM and WSI and the inter- and intra-observer agreements among pathologists on PSLs EUS acquired samples. METHODS: LM and WSI from 60 patients with PSLs were evaluated by five expert pathologists to define: diagnostic classification, presence of a core, number and percentage of lesional cells. Washout period between evaluations was 3 months. Time of the procedures was also assessed. RESULTS: Forty-eight cell-block and 12 biopsy samples were evaluated. A high concordance between LM and WSI was found. Inter- and intra-observer agreements for diagnostic classification were substantial and complete, respectively. For all the other parameters, the inter-observer agreement was usually higher for LM. For the intra-observer, a substantial agreement was reached regarding the presence of tissue core and the number and the percentage of malignant cells. Median time for performing LM was significantly shorter than for WSI (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: LM and WSI of cell-block and biopsy samples acquired by EUS in PSLs were highly concordant, with a substantial inter-observer and a complete intra-observer agreements regarding diagnostic classification.

6 Article The Role of Next-Generation Sequencing in the Cytologic Diagnosis of Pancreatic Lesions. 2018

de Biase, Dario / Visani, Michela / Acquaviva, Giorgia / Fornelli, Adele / Masetti, Michele / Fabbri, Carlo / Pession, Annalisa / Tallini, Giovanni. ·From the Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology (Dipartimento di Farmacia e Biotecnologie)-Molecular Diagnostic Unit, Azienda USL di Bologna, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy (Dr de Biase and Ms Pession) · the Department of Medicine (Dipartimento di Medicina Specialistica, Diagnostica e Sperimentale)-Molecular Diagnostic Unit, Azienda USL di Bologna, University of Bologna School of Medicine, Bologna, Italy (Drs Visani and Tallini and Ms Acquaviva) · the Unit of Anatomic Pathology, Azienda USL-Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy (Dr Fornelli) · and the Units of Surgery (Dr Masetti) and Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy (Dr Fabbri), Azienda USL Bologna Bellaria-Maggiore Hospitals, Bologna, Italy. ·Arch Pathol Lab Med · Pubmed #29565213.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: - Integration of the analysis of genetic markers with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration and cytologic evaluation has increased the accuracy of the preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. The application of high-throughput gene panel analysis using next-generation sequencing platforms is now offering a great opportunity for further improvements. OBJECTIVE: - To review the application of next-generation sequencing to the preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. DATA SOURCES: - For data acquisition, a PubMed search using the terms next-generation sequencing, pancreas, pancreatic lesions, pancreatic tumors, and EUS-FNA was performed covering the years 2000-2017. CONCLUSIONS: - KRAS remains the gene most widely studied for preoperative single-gene tests. Next-generation sequencing reliably allows analysis of multiple gene markers starting from limited amounts of DNA. The study of multigene panels has become a very attractive option for the management and preoperative risk stratification of patients with pancreatic cancer.

7 Article Long-term survivors of pancreatic adenocarcinoma show low rates of genetic alterations in KRAS, TP53 and SMAD4. 2018

Masetti, Michele / Acquaviva, Giorgia / Visani, Michela / Tallini, Giovanni / Fornelli, Adele / Ragazzi, Moira / Vasuri, Francesco / Grifoni, Daniela / Di Giacomo, Simone / Fiorino, Sirio / Lombardi, Raffaele / Tuminati, David / Ravaioli, Matteo / Fabbri, Carlo / Bacchi-Reggiani, Maria Letizia / Pession, Annalisa / Jovine, Elio / de Biase, Dario. ·Surgery Unit, Azienda USL-Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Medicine (Dipartimento di Medicina Specialistica, Diagnostica e Sperimentale) - Molecular Diagnostic Unit, Azienda USL di Bologna, University of Bologna School of Medicine, Bologna, Italy. · Anatomic Pathology Unit, Azienda USL-Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Anatomic Pathology Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova - IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Anatomic Pathology Unit, "F. Addarii" Institute of Oncology and Transplantation Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology (Dipartimento di Farmacia e Biotecnologie) - Molecular Diagnostic Unit, Azienda USL di Bologna, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Internal Medicine Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of General Surgery and Transplantation, St. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, AUSL Bologna Bellaria-Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Medicine (Dipartimento di Medicina Specialistica, Diagnostica e Sperimentale), Cardiology Unit, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. ·Cancer Biomark · Pubmed #29103024.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the deadliest human malignancies. Although surgery is currently the only effective treatment for PDAC, most patients survive less than 20 months after tumor resection. OBJECTIVE: The primary goal was to investigate alterations in KRAS, TP53, SMAD4 and CDKN2A/p16 in tumors from patients with exceptionally long survival after surgery. METHODS: Tumors from 15 patients with PDAC that survived more than 55 months after surgery ("LS") were analyzed for KRAS, TP53, IDH1, NRAS and BRAF using next-generation sequencing. SMAD4 and CDKN2A/p16 was tested using immunohistochemistry. MGMT promoter methylation was investigated. RESULTS: Tumors from "LS" have a lower prevalence of KRAS and TP53 mutations and had more frequently SMAD4 retained expression, if compared with that of patients died within 24 months from surgery. The survival of patients with wild-type KRAS and TP53 tumors was more than twice longer than that of patients bearing KRAS and TP53 mutations (90.2 vs. 41.1 months). Patients with KRAS wild-type tumors and that retained SMAD4 expression had a survival twice longer than cases with alterations in both genes (83.8 vs. 36.7 months). Eleven tumors (39.3%) showed MGMT methylation. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that absence of KRAS, TP53 and SMAD4 genetic alterations may identify a subset of pancreatic carcinomas with better outcome.

8 Article Fully automated PCR detection of KRAS mutations on pancreatic endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspirates. 2016

de Biase, Dario / de Luca, Caterina / Gragnano, Gianluca / Visani, Michela / Bellevicine, Claudio / Malapelle, Umberto / Tallini, Giovanni / Troncone, Giancarlo. ·Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology (FaBiT), Molecular Pathology Unit AUSL di Bologna, Bellaria Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Public Health, Anatomic Pathology Unit, University of Napoli Federico II School of Medicine, Napoli, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMES), Molecular Pathology Unit AUSL di Bologna, Bellaria Hospital, University of Bologna School of Medicine, Bologna, Italy. ·J Clin Pathol · Pubmed #27122185.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: In cystic and solid pancreatic lesions, KRAS mutational status refines the diagnosis of uncertain endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) aspirates. This test should have a fast turnaround time and ideally be performed at the centre where the patient is diagnosed. The Idylla KRAS Mutation Test enables standardisation even in units without molecular expertise. METHODS: The Idylla test was designed for use with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections. However, we directly pipetted 3 µL (corresponding to 1/10th of a DNA preparation from the aspirate sample) in the cartridge, which was automatically run as if an FFPE sample had been inserted. The performance was compared with Sanger sequencing, Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid PCR (ASLNAqPCR), and 454 Next Generation Sequencing (454-NGS) in light of clinicopathological end points. RESULTS: Idylla yielded valid results in 49/52 (94.2%) cases, in 2 h. A total of 18/49 cases showed mutation either in KRAS exon 2 (14/18) or in exon 3 (4/18). Idylla KRAS test had 100% specificity and a sensitivity (55.1%) higher than Sanger sequencing (41.3%) and identical to ASLNAqPCR (55.1%). When the low-abundant mutant allele (<5%) cases were excluded from the analysis, the Idylla KRAS Mutation Test clinical sensitivity increased to 61.9% approaching that of 454-NGS (66.6%). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study that applied the novel Idylla KRAS test to the clinical setting of pancreatic cancer. In particular, this system can be easily implemented in the routine assessment of pancreatic EUS-fine-needle aspiration-derived DNA samples to quickly provide information on KRAS mutational status to supplement cytological evaluation.

9 Article Next generation sequencing improves the accuracy of KRAS mutation analysis in endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration pancreatic lesions. 2014

de Biase, Dario / Visani, Michela / Baccarini, Paola / Polifemo, Anna Maria / Maimone, Antonella / Fornelli, Adele / Giuliani, Adriana / Zanini, Nicola / Fabbri, Carlo / Pession, Annalisa / Tallini, Giovanni. ·Department of Medicine (DIMES) - Anatomic Pathology Unit, Bellaria Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy ; Department of Pharmacology and Biotechnology (FaBiT), University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Pharmacology and Biotechnology (FaBiT), University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMES) - Anatomic Pathology Unit, Bellaria Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Unit of Gastroenterology, Azienda Unità Sanitaria Locale di Bologna - Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · School of Gastroenterology, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. · Anatomic Pathology Unit, Azienda Unità Sanitaria Locale di Bologna - Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, United States of America. · Unit of General Surgery, Azienda Unità Sanitaria Locale di Bologna - Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #24504548.

ABSTRACT: The use of endoscopic ultrasonography has allowed for improved detection and pathologic analysis of fine needle aspirate material for pancreatic lesion diagnosis. The molecular analysis of KRAS has further improved the clinical sensitivity of preoperative analysis. For this reason, the use of highly analytical sensitive and specific molecular tests in the analysis of material from fine needle aspirate specimens has become of great importance. In the present study, 60 specimens from endoscopic ultrasonography fine needle aspirate were analyzed for KRAS exon 2 and exon 3 mutations, using three different techniques: Sanger sequencing, allele specific locked nucleic acid PCR and Next Generation sequencing (454 GS-Junior, Roche). Moreover, KRAS was also tested in wild-type samples, starting from DNA obtained from cytological smears after pathological evaluation. Sanger sequencing showed a clinical sensitivity for the detection of the KRAS mutation of 42.1%, allele specific locked nucleic acid of 52.8% and Next Generation of 73.7%. In two wild-type cases the re-sequencing starting from selected material allowed to detect a KRAS mutation, increasing the clinical sensitivity of next generation sequencing to 78.95%. The present study demonstrated that the performance of molecular analysis could be improved by using highly analytical sensitive techniques. The Next Generation Sequencing allowed to increase the clinical sensitivity of the test without decreasing the specificity of the analysis. Moreover we observed that it could be useful to repeat the analysis starting from selectable material, such as cytological smears to avoid false negative results.

10 Article Multiple KRAS mutations in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: molecular features of neoplastic clones indicate the selection of divergent populations of tumor cells. 2013

Visani, Michela / de Biase, Dario / Baccarini, Paola / Fabbri, Carlo / Polifemo, Anna Maria / Zanini, Nicola / Pession, Annalisa / Tallini, Giovanni. ·1University of Bologna School of Medicine, Bologna, Italy. ·Int J Surg Pathol · Pubmed #23426962.

ABSTRACT: KRAS is one of the most common genes mutated in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Multiple KRAS mutations may be detected within the same pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but it is usually unclear whether the different mutations represent biologically irrelevant molecular events or whether they indicate the coexistence of distinct sizable neoplastic clones within a given tumor. We identified a case of pancreatic adenocarcinoma with 5 different mutations in the KRAS gene and have been able to characterize the allelic distribution of the KRAS mutations and the size of the neoplastic clones using allele-specific locked nucleic acid polymerase chain reaction and next-generation sequencing (454 GS-Junior). The results indicate that the tumor is composed of 5 distinct cell populations: one is KRAS G12V mutated (~38% of neoplastic cells), the second is KRAS G12V in one allele and KRAS G12D in the other (~32%), the third is KRAS G12V in one allele and KRAS G12R in the other (~24%), and the fourth is KRAS G12V in one allele and KRAS G12C in the other (~6%). The fifth clone, representing a minority of neoplastic cells, has a KRAS Q61H mutation in addition to one of the above alterations. Microsatellite analysis identified mutation of the NR21 marker out of the 13 tested, indicating that the tumor has a defect in maintaining DNA integrity different from loss of conventional DNA mismatch repair. These results are consistent with the successive selection of divergent populations of tumor cells and underscore the relevance of nucleotide instability in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

11 Minor Search for HBV and HCV Genome in Cancer Cells of Pancreatic Tumors. 2016

Fiorino, Sirio / Visani, Michela / Acquaviva, Giorgia / Fornelli, Adele / Masetti, Michele / Cuppini, Andrea / Bacchi-Reggiani, Maria Letizia / Jovine, Elio / Tallini, Giovanni / Pession, Annalisa / de Biase, Dario. ·Unità Operativa di Medicina Interna Ospedale di Budrio, Budrio Bologna, Italy sirio.fiorino@ausl.bologna.it Dipartimento di Farmacia e Biotecnologie (FABIT) Università di Bologna Bologna, Italy Unità Operativa di Anatomia Patologica AUSL Bologna Bellaria Hospital Bologna, Italy Operative Unit of Anatomic Pathology, AUSL Bologna, Maggiore Hospital Bologna, Italy Operative Unit of Surgery AUSL Bologna, Maggiore Hospital Bologna, Italy Unità Operativa di Medicina Interna Ospedale di Budrio, Budrio Bologna, Italy Department of Experimental Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine DIMES University of Bologna Bologna, Italy Operative Unit of Surgery AUSL Bologna Maggiore Hospital Bologna, Italy Department of Experimental Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine DIMES, University of Bologna Bologna, Italy Dipartimento di Farmacia e Biotecnologie (FABIT) Università di Bologna Bologna, Italy Dipartimento di Farmacia e Biotecnologie (FABIT) Università di Bologna Bologna, Italy and Department of Experimental Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine DIMES, University of Bologna Bologna, Italy. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #26658043.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Minor Hepatitis B virus infection and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor: a case report. 2015

Fiorino, Sirio / de Biase, Dario / Fornelli, Adele / Masetti, Michele / Cuppini, Andrea / Bondi, Arrigo / Tallini, Giovanni / Jovine, Elio / Pession, Annalisa. ·Unità Operativa di Medicina Interna Ospedale di Budrio, Budrio Bologna, Italy sirio.fiorino@ausl.bologna.it Dipartimento di Medicina Diagnostica e Sperimentale Ospedale Bellaria Università di Bologna Bologna, Italy Unità Operativa di Anatomia Patologica Azienda Unità Sanitaria Locale Bologna Maggiore Hospital Bologna, Italy Unità Operativa di Chirurgia A Ospedale Maggiore Bologna, Italy Unità Operativa di Medicina Interna Ospedale di Budrio, Budrio Bologna, Italy Unità Operativa di Anatomia Patologica Azienda Unità Sanitaria Locale Bologna Maggiore Hospital Bologna, Italy Dipartimento di Medicina Diagnostica e Sperimentale Ospedale Bellaria Università di Bologna Bologna, Italy Unità Operativa di Chirurgia A Ospedale Maggiore Bologna, Italy Dipartimento di Farmacia e Biotecnologie Università di Bologna Bologna, Italy. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #25675420.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --