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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Robert L. Sutherland
Based on 9 articles published since 2010
(Why 9 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, R. L. Sutherland wrote the following 9 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer. 2016

Bailey, Peter / Chang, David K / Nones, Katia / Johns, Amber L / Patch, Ann-Marie / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Miller, David K / Christ, Angelika N / Bruxner, Tim J C / Quinn, Michael C / Nourse, Craig / Murtaugh, L Charles / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Manning, Suzanne / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Wani, Shivangi / Fink, Lynn / Holmes, Oliver / Chin, Venessa / Anderson, Matthew J / Kazakoff, Stephen / Leonard, Conrad / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Wilson, Peter J / Cloonan, Nicole / Kassahn, Karin S / Taylor, Darrin / Quek, Kelly / Robertson, Alan / Pantano, Lorena / Mincarelli, Laura / Sanchez, Luis N / Evers, Lisa / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark J / Jones, Marc D / Colvin, Emily K / Nagrial, Adnan M / Humphrey, Emily S / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Humphris, Jeremy / Chou, Angela / Pajic, Marina / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia V / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Rooman, Ilse / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Lovell, Jessica A / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher W / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Moran-Jones, Kim / Jamieson, Nigel B / Graham, Janet S / Duthie, Fraser / Oien, Karin / Hair, Jane / Grützmann, Robert / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Corbo, Vincenzo / Bassi, Claudio / Rusev, Borislav / Capelli, Paola / Salvia, Roberto / Tortora, Giampaolo / Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata / Petersen, Gloria M / Anonymous2640859 / Munzy, Donna M / Fisher, William E / Karim, Saadia A / Eshleman, James R / Hruban, Ralph H / Pilarsky, Christian / Morton, Jennifer P / Sansom, Owen J / Scarpa, Aldo / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo / Hofmann, Oliver / Sutherland, Robert L / Wheeler, David A / Gill, Anthony J / Gibbs, Richard A / Pearson, John V / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M. ·Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia. · South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland 4006, Australia. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Michael DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Pathology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · Harvard Chan Bioinformatics Core, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. · Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, New South Wales 2560, Australia. · Department of Pathology. SydPath, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. · St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2052, Australia. · School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia. · University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown New South Wales 2050, Australia. · School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. · Fiona Stanley Hospital, Robin Warren Drive, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. · School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Nedlands 6009, Australia and St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN, UK. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow &Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. · GGC Bio-repository, Pathology Department, Southern General Hospital, 1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TY, UK. · Department of Surgery, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany. · Departments of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Texas 77030, USA. · The David M. Rubenstein Pancreatic Cancer Research Center and Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · ARC-Net Applied Research on Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. · Elkins Pancreas Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS226, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · Institute for Cancer Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK. · University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia. ·Nature · Pubmed #26909576.

ABSTRACT: Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development.

2 Article The epigenetic agents suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and 5‑AZA‑2' deoxycytidine decrease cell proliferation, induce cell death and delay the growth of MiaPaCa2 pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. 2015

Susanto, Johana M / Colvin, Emily K / Pinese, Mark / Chang, David K / Pajic, Marina / Mawson, Amanda / Caldon, C Elizabeth / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Henshall, Susan M / Sutherland, Robert L / Biankin, Andrew V / Scarlett, Christopher J. ·Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. ·Int J Oncol · Pubmed #25695794.

ABSTRACT: Despite incremental advances in the diagnosis and treatment for pancreatic cancer (PC), the 5‑year survival rate remains <5%. Novel therapies to increase survival and quality of life for PC patients are desperately needed. Epigenetic thera-peutic agents such as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTi) have demonstrated therapeutic benefits in human cancer. We assessed the efficacy of these epigenetic therapeutic agents as potential therapies for PC using in vitro and in vivo models. Treatment with HDACi [suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA)] and DNMTi [5‑AZA‑2' deoxycytidine (5‑AZA‑dc)] decreased cell proliferation in MiaPaCa2 cells, and SAHA treatment, with or without 5‑AZA‑dc, resulted in higher cell death and lower DNA synthesis compared to 5‑AZA‑dc alone and controls (DMSO). Further, combination treatment with SAHA and 5‑AZA‑dc significantly increased expression of p21WAF1, leading to G1 arrest. Treatment with epigenetic agents delayed tumour growth in vivo, but did not decrease growth of established pancreatic tumours. In conclusion, these data demonstrate a potential role for epigenetic modifier drugs for the management of PC, specifically in the chemoprevention of PC, in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents.

3 Article Adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly patients with pancreatic cancer. 2014

Nagrial, A M / Chang, D K / Nguyen, N Q / Johns, A L / Chantrill, L A / Humphris, J L / Chin, V T / Samra, J S / Gill, A J / Pajic, M / Anonymous2980776 / Pinese, M / Colvin, E K / Scarlett, C J / Chou, A / Kench, J G / Sutherland, R L / Horvath, L G / Biankin, A V. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia [2] Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney NSW 2200, Australia [3] South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Liverpool NSW 2170, Australia [4] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G61 1BD, Scotland, UK. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia [2] Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown, NSW 2560, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW 2065, Australia. · 1] Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW 2065, Australia [2] Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006; Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia [2] School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, NSW 2258, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia [2] Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia [2] Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia [2] St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia [2] Department of Medical Oncology, Sydney Cancer Centre, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #24263063.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Adjuvant chemotherapy improves survival for patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Elderly patients are under-represented in Phase III clinical trials, and as a consequence the efficacy of adjuvant therapy in older patients with pancreatic cancer is not clear. We aimed to assess the use and efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in older patients with pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We assessed a community cohort of 439 patients with a diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma who underwent operative resection in centres associated with the Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative. RESULTS: The median age of the cohort was 67 years. Overall only 47% of all patients received adjuvant therapy. Patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy were predominantly younger, had later stage disease, more lymph node involvement and more evidence of perineural invasion than the group that did not receive adjuvant treatment. Overall, adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with prolonged survival (median 22.1 vs 15.8 months; P<0.0001). Older patients (aged ≥70) were less likely to receive adjuvant chemotherapy (51.5% vs 29.8%; P<0.0001). Older patients had a particularly poor outcome when adjuvant therapy was not delivered (median survival=13.1 months; HR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.27-2.78, P=0.002). CONCLUSION: Patients aged ≥70 are less likely to receive adjuvant therapy although it is associated with improved outcome. Increased use of adjuvant therapy in older individuals is encouraged as they constitute a large proportion of patients with pancreatic cancer.

4 Article Sirtuin-1 regulates acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and supports cancer cell viability in pancreatic cancer. 2013

Wauters, Elke / Sanchez-Arévalo Lobo, Victor J / Pinho, Andreia V / Mawson, Amanda / Herranz, Daniel / Wu, Jianmin / Cowley, Mark J / Colvin, Emily K / Njicop, Erna Ngwayi / Sutherland, Rob L / Liu, Tao / Serrano, Manuel / Bouwens, Luc / Real, Francisco X / Biankin, Andrew V / Rooman, Ilse. ·Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #23370328.

ABSTRACT: The exocrine pancreas can undergo acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), as in the case of pancreatitis where precursor lesions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) can arise. The NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt1) has been implicated in carcinogenesis with dual roles depending on its subcellular localization. In this study, we examined the expression and the role of Sirt1 in different stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis, i.e. ADM models and established PDAC. In addition, we analyzed the expression of KIAA1967, a key mediator of Sirt1 function, along with potential Sirt1 downstream targets. Sirt1 was co-expressed with KIAA1967 in the nuclei of normal pancreatic acinar cells. In ADM, Sirt1 underwent a transient nuclear-to-cytoplasmic shuttling. Experiments where during ADM, we enforced repression of Sirt1 shuttling, inhibition of Sirt1 activity or modulation of its expression, all underscore that the temporary decrease of nuclear and increase of cytoplasmic Sirt1 stimulate ADM. Our results further underscore that important transcriptional regulators of acinar differentiation, that is, Pancreatic transcription factor-1a and β-catenin can be deacetylated by Sirt1. Inhibition of Sirt1 is effective in suppression of ADM and in reducing cell viability in established PDAC tumors. KIAA1967 expression is differentially downregulated in PDAC and impacts on the sensitivity of PDAC cells to the Sirt1/2 inhibitor Tenovin-6. In PDAC, acetylation of β-catenin is not affected, unlike p53, a well-characterized Sirt1-regulated protein in tumor cells. Our results reveal that Sirt1 is an important regulator and potential therapeutic target in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

5 Article Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes. 2012

Biankin, Andrew V / Waddell, Nicola / Kassahn, Karin S / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B / Johns, Amber L / Miller, David K / Wilson, Peter J / Patch, Ann-Marie / Wu, Jianmin / Chang, David K / Cowley, Mark J / Gardiner, Brooke B / Song, Sarah / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Manning, Suzanne / Wani, Shivangi / Gongora, Milena / Pajic, Marina / Scarlett, Christopher J / Gill, Anthony J / Pinho, Andreia V / Rooman, Ilse / Anderson, Matthew / Holmes, Oliver / Leonard, Conrad / Taylor, Darrin / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Nones, Katia / Fink, J Lynn / Christ, Angelika / Bruxner, Tim / Cloonan, Nicole / Kolle, Gabriel / Newell, Felicity / Pinese, Mark / Mead, R Scott / Humphris, Jeremy L / Kaplan, Warren / Jones, Marc D / Colvin, Emily K / Nagrial, Adnan M / Humphrey, Emily S / Chou, Angela / Chin, Venessa T / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Lovell, Jessica A / Daly, Roger J / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Anonymous5580740 / Kakkar, Nipun / Zhao, Fengmei / Wu, Yuan Qing / Wang, Min / Muzny, Donna M / Fisher, William E / Brunicardi, F Charles / Hodges, Sally E / Reid, Jeffrey G / Drummond, Jennifer / Chang, Kyle / Han, Yi / Lewis, Lora R / Dinh, Huyen / Buhay, Christian J / Beck, Timothy / Timms, Lee / Sam, Michelle / Begley, Kimberly / Brown, Andrew / Pai, Deepa / Panchal, Ami / Buchner, Nicholas / De Borja, Richard / Denroche, Robert E / Yung, Christina K / Serra, Stefano / Onetto, Nicole / Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata / Tsao, Ming-Sound / Shaw, Patricia A / Petersen, Gloria M / Gallinger, Steven / Hruban, Ralph H / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Schulick, Richard D / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Capelli, Paola / Corbo, Vincenzo / Scardoni, Maria / Tortora, Giampaolo / Tempero, Margaret A / Mann, Karen M / Jenkins, Nancy A / Perez-Mancera, Pedro A / Adams, David J / Largaespada, David A / Wessels, Lodewyk F A / Rust, Alistair G / Stein, Lincoln D / Tuveson, David A / Copeland, Neal G / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Scarpa, Aldo / Eshleman, James R / Hudson, Thomas J / Sutherland, Robert L / Wheeler, David A / Pearson, John V / McPherson, John D / Gibbs, Richard A / Grimmond, Sean M. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. ·Nature · Pubmed #23103869.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

6 Article RON is not a prognostic marker for resectable pancreatic cancer. 2012

Tactacan, Carole M / Chang, David K / Cowley, Mark J / Humphrey, Emily S / Wu, Jianmin / Gill, Anthony J / Chou, Angela / Nones, Katia / Grimmond, Sean M / Sutherland, Robert L / Biankin, Andrew V / Daly, Roger J / Anonymous2920736. ·Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. ·BMC Cancer · Pubmed #22958871.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The receptor tyrosine kinase RON exhibits increased expression during pancreatic cancer progression and promotes migration, invasion and gemcitabine resistance of pancreatic cancer cells in experimental models. However, the prognostic significance of RON expression in pancreatic cancer is unknown. METHODS: RON expression was characterized in several large cohorts, including a prospective study, totaling 492 pancreatic cancer patients and relationships with patient outcome and clinico-pathologic variables were assessed. RESULTS: RON expression was associated with outcome in a training set, but this was not recapitulated in the validation set, nor was there any association with therapeutic responsiveness in the validation set or the prospective study. CONCLUSIONS: Although RON is implicated in pancreatic cancer progression in experimental models, and may constitute a therapeutic target, RON expression is not associated with prognosis or therapeutic responsiveness in resected pancreatic cancer.

7 Article The prognostic and predictive value of serum CA19.9 in pancreatic cancer. 2012

Humphris, J L / Chang, D K / Johns, A L / Scarlett, C J / Pajic, M / Jones, M D / Colvin, E K / Nagrial, A / Chin, V T / Chantrill, L A / Samra, J S / Gill, A J / Kench, J G / Merrett, N D / Das, A / Musgrove, E A / Sutherland, R L / Biankin, A V / Anonymous2410715. ·Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Australia. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #22241899.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Current staging methods for pancreatic cancer (PC) are inadequate, and biomarkers to aid clinical decision making are lacking. Despite the availability of the serum marker carbohydrate antigen 19.9 (CA19.9) for over two decades, its precise role in the management of PC is yet to be defined, and as a consequence, it is not widely used. METHODS: We assessed the relationship between perioperative serum CA19.9 levels, survival and adjuvant chemotherapeutic responsiveness in a cohort of 260 patients who underwent operative resection for PC. RESULTS: By specifically assessing the subgroup of patients with detectable CA19.9, we identified potential utility at key clinical decision points. Low postoperative CA19.9 at 3 months (median survival 25.6 vs 14.8 months, P=0.0052) and before adjuvant chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors. Patients with postoperative CA 19.9 levels>90 U/ml did not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy (P=0.7194) compared with those with a CA19.9 of ≤90 U/ml (median 26.0 vs 16.7 months, P=0.0108). Normalization of CA19.9 within 6 months of resection was also an independent favorable prognostic factor (median 29.9 vs 14.8 months, P=0.0004) and normal perioperative CA19.9 levels identified a good prognostic group, which was associated with a 5-year survival of 42%. CONCLUSIONS: Perioperative serum CA19.9 measurements are informative in patients with detectable CA19.9 (defined by serum levels of >5 U/ml) and have potential clinical utility in predicting outcome and response to adjuvant chemotherapy. Future clinical trials should prioritize incorporation of CA19.9 measurement at key decision points to prospectively validate these findings and facilitate implementation.

8 Article Retinoid signaling in pancreatic cancer, injury and regeneration. 2011

Colvin, Emily K / Susanto, Johana M / Kench, James G / Ong, Vivienna N / Mawson, Amanda / Pinese, Mark / Chang, David K / Rooman, Ilse / O'Toole, Sandra A / Segara, Davendra / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Sutherland, Robert L / Apte, Minoti V / Scarlett, Christopher J / Biankin, Andrew V. ·Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, Australia. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #22220202.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Activation of embryonic signaling pathways quiescent in the adult pancreas is a feature of pancreatic cancer (PC). These discoveries have led to the development of novel inhibitors of pathways such as Notch and Hedgehog signaling that are currently in early phase clinical trials in the treatment of several cancer types. Retinoid signaling is also essential for pancreatic development, and retinoid therapy is used successfully in other malignancies such as leukemia, but little is known concerning retinoid signaling in PC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the role of retinoid signaling in vitro and in vivo in normal pancreas, pancreatic injury, regeneration and cancer. Retinoid signaling is active in occasional cells in the adult pancreas but is markedly augmented throughout the parenchyma during injury and regeneration. Both chemically induced and genetically engineered mouse models of PC exhibit a lack of retinoid signaling activity compared to normal pancreas. As a consequence, we investigated Cellular Retinoid Binding Protein 1 (CRBP1), a key regulator of retinoid signaling known to play a role in breast cancer development, as a potential therapeutic target. Loss, or significant downregulation of CRBP1 was present in 70% of human PC, and was evident in the very earliest precursor lesions (PanIN-1A). However, in vitro gain and loss of function studies and CRBP1 knockout mice suggested that loss of CRBP1 expression alone was not sufficient to induce carcinogenesis or to alter PC sensitivity to retinoid based therapies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, retinoid signalling appears to play a role in pancreatic regeneration and carcinogenesis, but unlike breast cancer, it is not mediated directly by CRBP1.

9 Article Recruitment and activation of pancreatic stellate cells from the bone marrow in pancreatic cancer: a model of tumor-host interaction. 2011

Scarlett, Christopher J / Colvin, Emily K / Pinese, Mark / Chang, David K / Morey, Adrienne L / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Pajic, Marina / Apte, Minoti / Henshall, Susan M / Sutherland, Robert L / Kench, James G / Biankin, Andrew V. ·Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, Australia. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #22022519.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer are characterised by extensive stellate cell mediated fibrosis, and current therapeutic development includes targeting pancreatic cancer stroma and tumor-host interactions. Recent evidence has suggested that circulating bone marrow derived stem cells (BMDC) contribute to solid organs. We aimed to define the role of circulating haematopoietic cells in the normal and diseased pancreas. METHODS: Whole bone marrow was harvested from male β-actin-EGFP donor mice and transplanted into irradiated female recipient C57/BL6 mice. Chronic pancreatitis was induced with repeat injections of caerulein, while carcinogenesis was induced with an intrapancreatic injection of dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA). Phenotype of engrafted donor-derived cells within the pancreas was assessed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. RESULTS: GFP positive cells were visible in the exocrine pancreatic epithelia from 3 months post transplantation. These exhibited acinar morphology and were positive for amylase and peanut agglutinin. Mice administered caerulein developed chronic pancreatitis while DMBA mice exhibited precursor lesions and pancreatic cancer. No acinar cells were identified to be donor-derived upon cessation of cerulein treatment, however rare occurrences of bone marrow-derived acinar cells were observed during pancreatic regeneration. Increased recruitment of BMDC was observed within the desmoplastic stroma, contributing to the activated pancreatic stellate cell (PaSC) population in both diseases. Expression of stellate cell markers CELSR3, PBX1 and GFAP was observed in BMD cancer-associated PaSCs, however cancer-associated, but not pancreatitis-associated BMD PaSCs, expressed the cancer PaSC specific marker CELSR3. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that BMDC can incorporate into the pancreas and adopt the differentiated state of the exocrine compartment. BMDC that contribute to the activated PaSC population in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer have different phenotypes, and may play important roles in these diseases. Further, bone marrow transplantation may provide a useful model for the study of tumor-host interactions in cancer and pancreatitis.