Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Christian Sturesson
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Christian Sturesson wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Pancreatic cancer: yesterday, today and tomorrow. 2016

Ansari, Daniel / Tingstedt, Bobby / Andersson, Bodil / Holmquist, Fredrik / Sturesson, Christian / Williamsson, Caroline / Sasor, Agata / Borg, David / Bauden, Monika / Andersson, Roland. ·Department of Surgery, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University & Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Radiology, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University & Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Pathology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Oncology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. ·Future Oncol · Pubmed #27246628.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is one of our most lethal malignancies. Despite substantial improvements in the survival rates for other major cancer forms, pancreatic cancer survival rates have remained relatively unchanged since the 1960s. Pancreatic cancer is usually detected at an advanced stage and most treatment regimens are ineffective, contributing to the poor overall prognosis. Herein, we review the current understanding of pancreatic cancer, focusing on central aspects of disease management from radiology, surgery and pathology to oncology.

2 Article Outcomes and Risk Score for Distal Pancreatectomy with Celiac Axis Resection (DP-CAR): An International Multicenter Analysis. 2019

Klompmaker, Sjors / Peters, Niek A / van Hilst, Jony / Bassi, Claudio / Boggi, Ugo / Busch, Olivier R / Niesen, Willem / Van Gulik, Thomas M / Javed, Ammar A / Kleeff, Jorg / Kawai, Manabu / Lesurtel, Mickael / Lombardo, Carlo / Moser, A James / Okada, Ken-Ichi / Popescu, Irinel / Prasad, Raj / Salvia, Roberto / Sauvanet, Alain / Sturesson, Christian / Weiss, Matthew J / Zeh, Herbert J / Zureikat, Amer H / Yamaue, Hiroki / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Hogg, Melissa E / Besselink, Marc G / Anonymous4750974. ·Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Utrecht Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Visceral, Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Saale, Germany. · Second Department of Surgery, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan. · Department of Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Croix-Rousse University Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, University of Lyon I, Lyon, France. · The Pancreas and Liver Institute, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Center of General Surgery and Liver Transplant, Fundeni Clinical Institute, Bucharest, Romania. · Department of HPB and Transplant Services, National Health Service, Leeds, UK. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hôpital Beaujon, APHP, University Paris VII, Clichy, France. · Division of Surgery, Department for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Department of Surgery, Northshore University HealthSystem, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. m.g.besselink@amc.nl. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30610560.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection (DP-CAR) is a treatment option for selected patients with pancreatic cancer involving the celiac axis. A recent multicenter European study reported a 90-day mortality rate of 16%, highlighting the importance of patient selection. The authors constructed a risk score to predict 90-day mortality and assessed oncologic outcomes. METHODS: This multicenter retrospective cohort study investigated patients undergoing DP-CAR at 20 European centers from 12 countries (model design 2000-2016) and three very-high-volume international centers in the United States and Japan (model validation 2004-2017). The area under receiver operator curve (AUC) and calibration plots were used for validation of the 90-day mortality risk model. Secondary outcomes included resection margin status, adjuvant therapy, and survival. RESULTS: For 191 DP-CAR patients, the 90-day mortality rate was 5.5% (95 confidence interval [CI], 2.2-11%) at 5 high-volume (≥ 1 DP-CAR/year) and 18% (95 CI, 9-30%) at 18 low-volume DP-CAR centers (P = 0.015). A risk score with age, sex, body mass index (BMI), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, multivisceral resection, open versus minimally invasive surgery, and low- versus high-volume center performed well in both the design and validation cohorts (AUC, 0.79 vs 0.74; P = 0.642). For 174 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the R0 resection rate was 60%, neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies were applied for respectively 69% and 67% of the patients, and the median overall survival period was 19 months (95 CI, 15-25 months). CONCLUSIONS: When performed for selected patients at high-volume centers, DP-CAR is associated with acceptable 90-day mortality and overall survival. The authors propose a 90-day mortality risk score to improve patient selection and outcomes, with DP-CAR volume as the dominant predictor.

3 Article Outcomes After Distal Pancreatectomy with Celiac Axis Resection for Pancreatic Cancer: A Pan-European Retrospective Cohort Study. 2018

Klompmaker, Sjors / van Hilst, Jony / Gerritsen, Sarah L / Adham, Mustapha / Teresa Albiol Quer, M / Bassi, Claudio / Berrevoet, Frederik / Boggi, Ugo / Busch, Olivier R / Cesaretti, Manuela / Dalla Valle, Raffaele / Darnis, Benjamin / De Pastena, Matteo / Del Chiaro, Marco / Grützmann, Robert / Diener, Markus K / Dumitrascu, Traian / Friess, Helmut / Ivanecz, Arpad / Karayiannakis, Anastasios / Fusai, Giuseppe K / Labori, Knut J / Lombardo, Carlo / López-Ben, Santiago / Mabrut, Jean-Yves / Niesen, Willem / Pardo, Fernando / Perinel, Julie / Popescu, Irinel / Roeyen, Geert / Sauvanet, Alain / Prasad, Raj / Sturesson, Christian / Lesurtel, Mickael / Kleeff, Jorg / Salvia, Roberto / Besselink, Marc G / Anonymous5490939. ·Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Digestive Surgery, E. Herriot Hospital, HCL, UCBL1, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr. Josep Trueta, Girona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General and HPB Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy Cedex, France. · Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Unit, Parma University Hospital, Parma, Italy. · Department of Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Croix-Rousse University Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, University of Lyon I, Lyon, France. · Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany. · Center of General Surgery and Liver Transplant, Fundeni Clinical Institute, Bucharest, Romania. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Abdominal and General Surgery, University Medical Centre Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia. · Second Department of Surgery, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece. · HPB Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of HPB and Transplant Surgery, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Department of Hepatobiliary, Endocrine and Transplantation Surgery, Antwerp University Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium. · Department of HPB and Transplant Services, National Health Service, Leeds, UK. · Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Visceral, Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. m.g.besselink@amc.nl. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29532342.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Western multicenter studies on distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection (DP-CAR), also known as the Appleby procedure, for locally advanced pancreatic cancer are lacking. We aimed to study overall survival, morbidity, mortality and the impact of preoperative hepatic artery embolization (PHAE). METHODS: Retrospective cohort study within the European-African Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary-Association, on DP-CAR between 1-1-2000 and 6-1-2016. Primary endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were radicality (R0-resection), 90-day mortality, major morbidity, and pancreatic fistulae (grade B/C). RESULTS: We included 68 patients from 20 hospitals in 12 countries. Postoperatively, 53% of patients had R0-resection, 25% major morbidity, 21% an ISGPS grade B/C pancreatic fistula, and 16% mortality. In total, 82% received (neo-)adjuvant chemotherapy and median overall survival in 62 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients was 18 months (CI 10-37). We observed no impact of PHAE on ischemic complications. CONCLUSIONS: DP-CAR combined with chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer is associated with acceptable overall survival. The 90-day mortality is too high and should be reduced. Future studies should investigate to what extent increasing surgical volume or better patient selection can improve outcomes.