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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Elena M. Stoffel
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Elena Stoffel wrote the following 8 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Evaluating Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer: ASCO Provisional Clinical Opinion. 2019

Stoffel, Elena M / McKernin, Shannon E / Brand, Randall / Canto, Marcia / Goggins, Michael / Moravek, Cassadie / Nagarajan, Arun / Petersen, Gloria M / Simeone, Diane M / Yurgelun, Matthew / Khorana, Alok A. ·1 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. · 2 American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA. · 3 University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. · 4 Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. · 5 Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, Los Angeles, CA. · 6 Taussig Cancer Institute and Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH. · 7 Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · 8 New York University Langone Health, New York, NY. · 9 Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #30457921.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: An ASCO provisional clinical opinion (PCO) offers timely clinical direction to ASCO's membership and other health care providers. This PCO addresses identification and management of patients and family members with possible predisposition to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS: ASCO convened an Expert Panel and conducted a systematic review of the literature published from January 1998 to June 2018. Results of the databases searched were supplemented with hand searching of the bibliographies of systematic reviews and selected seminal articles and contributions from Expert Panel members' curated files. PROVISIONAL CLINICAL OPINION: All patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma should undergo assessment of risk for hereditary syndromes known to be associated with an increased risk for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Assessment of risk should include a comprehensive review of family history of cancer. Individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer affecting two first-degree relatives meet criteria for familial pancreatic cancer (FPC). Individuals (cancer affected or unaffected) with a family history of pancreatic cancer meeting criteria for FPC, those with three or more diagnoses of pancreatic cancer in same side of the family, and individuals meeting criteria for other genetic syndromes associated with increased risk for pancreatic cancer have an increased risk for pancreatic cancer and are candidates for genetic testing. Germline genetic testing for cancer susceptibility may be discussed with individuals diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, even if family history is unremarkable. Benefits and limitations of pancreatic cancer screening should be discussed with individuals whose family history meets criteria for FPC and/or genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/gastrointestinal-cancer-guidelines .

2 Review Heritable Gastrointestinal Cancer Syndromes. 2016

Stoffel, Elena M. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, 2150A Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. Electronic address: estoffel@med.umich.edu. ·Gastroenterol Clin North Am · Pubmed #27546846.

ABSTRACT: Although almost all gastrointestinal cancers develop from sporadic genomic events, approximately 5% arise from germline mutations in genes associated with cancer predisposition. The number of these genes continues to increase. Tumor phenotypes and family history provide the framework for identifying at-risk individuals. The diagnosis of a hereditary cancer syndrome has implications for management of patients and their families. Systematic approaches that integrate family history and molecular characterization of tumors and polyps facilitate identification of individuals with this genetic predisposition. This article summarizes diagnosis and management of hereditary cancer syndromes associated with gastrointestinal cancers.

3 Review Familial gastric and pancreatic cancers: Diagnosis and screening. 2013

Raymond, Victoria M / Stoffel, Elena M. ·From the Divisions of Gastroenterology and Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. ·Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book · Pubmed #23714452.

ABSTRACT: Screening for gastric and pancreatic cancers in asymptomatic individuals is not routinely practiced in the United States. While there is insufficient evidence that general population screening would reduce morbidity and/or mortality associated with these cancers, the utility of screening for individuals at increased risk warrants further study. Clinical challenges include identifying high risk individuals who would be most likely to benefit from screening and determining which screening modalities and intervals would be most effective.

4 Clinical Trial Mutations in the pancreatic secretory enzymes 2018

Tamura, Koji / Yu, Jun / Hata, Tatsuo / Suenaga, Masaya / Shindo, Koji / Abe, Toshiya / MacGregor-Das, Anne / Borges, Michael / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Weiss, Matthew J / He, Jin / Canto, Marcia Irene / Petersen, Gloria M / Gallinger, Steven / Syngal, Sapna / Brand, Randall E / Rustgi, Anil / Olson, Sara H / Stoffel, Elena / Cote, Michele L / Zogopoulos, George / Potash, James B / Goes, Fernando S / McCombie, Richard W / Zandi, Peter P / Pirooznia, Mehdi / Kramer, Melissa / Parla, Jennifer / Eshleman, James R / Roberts, Nicholas J / Hruban, Ralph H / Klein, Alison Patricia / Goggins, Michael. ·Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205. · Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205. · Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205. · The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205. · Department of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205. · Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X5. · Population Sciences Division, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215. · Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104. · Department of Genetics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104. · Pancreatic Cancer Translational Center of Excellence, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104. · Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10017. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. · Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201. · The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3H 2R9. · The Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 1A3. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21287. · Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724. · InGenious Targeting Laboratory, Ronkonkoma, NY 11779. · Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205. · Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205; mgoggins@jhmi.edu. ·Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A · Pubmed #29669919.

ABSTRACT: To evaluate whether germline variants in genes encoding pancreatic secretory enzymes contribute to pancreatic cancer susceptibility, we sequenced the coding regions of

5 Article Management of patients with increased risk for familial pancreatic cancer: updated recommendations from the International Cancer of the Pancreas Screening (CAPS) Consortium. 2020

Goggins, Michael / Overbeek, Kasper Alexander / Brand, Randall / Syngal, Sapna / Del Chiaro, Marco / Bartsch, Detlef K / Bassi, Claudio / Carrato, Alfredo / Farrell, James / Fishman, Elliot K / Fockens, Paul / Gress, Thomas M / van Hooft, Jeanin E / Hruban, R H / Kastrinos, Fay / Klein, Allison / Lennon, Anne Marie / Lucas, Aimee / Park, Walter / Rustgi, Anil / Simeone, Diane / Stoffel, Elena / Vasen, Hans F A / Cahen, Djuna L / Canto, Marcia Irene / Bruno, Marco / Anonymous1461018. ·Pathology, Medicine Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA mgoggins@jhmi.edu. · Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. · GI Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program, Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Denver, Colorado, USA. · Division of Visceral, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Department of Surgey, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Medical Oncology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · The Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Amsterdam Gastroenterology & Metabolism, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Gastroenterology, Endocrinology, Metabolism and Infectiology, University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Amsterdam University Medical Centres, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Columbia University Medical Center, New York City, New York, USA. · Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Columbia University, New York City, New York, USA. · Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, New York, USA. · New York University Medical Center, New York City, New York, USA. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. · Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands. ·Gut · Pubmed #31672839.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIM: The International Cancer of the Pancreas Screening Consortium met in 2018 to update its consensus recommendations for the management of individuals with increased risk of pancreatic cancer based on family history or germline mutation status (high-risk individuals). METHODS: A modified Delphi approach was employed to reach consensus among a multidisciplinary group of experts who voted on consensus statements. Consensus was considered reached if ≥75% agreed or disagreed. RESULTS: Consensus was reached on 55 statements. The main goals of surveillance (to identify high-grade dysplastic precursor lesions and T1N0M0 pancreatic cancer) remained unchanged. Experts agreed that for those with familial risk, surveillance should start no earlier than age 50 or 10 years earlier than the youngest relative with pancreatic cancer, but were split on whether to start at age 50 or 55. Germline CONCLUSIONS: Pancreatic surveillance is recommended for selected high-risk individuals to detect early pancreatic cancer and its high-grade precursors, but should be performed in a research setting by multidisciplinary teams in centres with appropriate expertise. Until more evidence supporting these recommendations is available, the benefits, risks and costs of surveillance of pancreatic surveillance need additional evaluation.

6 Article A region-based gene association study combined with a leave-one-out sensitivity analysis identifies SMG1 as a pancreatic cancer susceptibility gene. 2019

Wong, Cavin / Chen, Fei / Alirezaie, Najmeh / Wang, Yifan / Cuggia, Adeline / Borgida, Ayelet / Holter, Spring / Lenko, Tatiana / Domecq, Celine / Anonymous4851119 / Petersen, Gloria M / Syngal, Sapna / Brand, Randall / Rustgi, Anil K / Cote, Michele L / Stoffel, Elena / Olson, Sara H / Roberts, Nicholas J / Akbari, Mohammad R / Majewski, Jacek / Klein, Alison P / Greenwood, Celia M T / Gallinger, Steven / Zogopoulos, George. ·The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · The Goodman Cancer Research Centre of McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. · McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States of America. · Division of Cancer Genetics and Prevention, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Gastroenterology Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical Schozol, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America. · Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America. · Division of Gastroenterology, Departments of Medicine and Genetics, Pancreatic Cancer Translation Center of Excellence, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America. · Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, United States of America. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, United States of America. · Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. · The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. · Women's College Hospital Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Ludmer Centre for Neuroinformatics & Mental Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Lady Davis Institute, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Gerald Bronfman Department of Oncology, and Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ·PLoS Genet · Pubmed #31469826.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) is a lethal malignancy that is familial or associated with genetic syndromes in 10% of cases. Gene-based surveillance strategies for at-risk individuals may improve clinical outcomes. However, familial PC (FPC) is plagued by genetic heterogeneity and the genetic basis for the majority of FPC remains elusive, hampering the development of gene-based surveillance programs. The study was powered to identify genes with a cumulative pathogenic variant prevalence of at least 3%, which includes the most prevalent PC susceptibility gene, BRCA2. Since the majority of known PC susceptibility genes are involved in DNA repair, we focused on genes implicated in these pathways. We performed a region-based association study using the Mixed-Effects Score Test, followed by leave-one-out characterization of PC-associated gene regions and variants to identify the genes and variants driving risk associations. We evaluated 398 cases from two case series and 987 controls without a personal history of cancer. The first case series consisted of 109 patients with either FPC (n = 101) or PC at ≤50 years of age (n = 8). The second case series was composed of 289 unselected PC cases. We validated this discovery strategy by identifying known pathogenic BRCA2 variants, and also identified SMG1, encoding a serine/threonine protein kinase, to be significantly associated with PC following correction for multiple testing (p = 3.22x10-7). The SMG1 association was validated in a second independent series of 532 FPC cases and 753 controls (p<0.0062, OR = 1.88, 95%CI 1.17-3.03). We showed segregation of the c.4249A>G SMG1 variant in 3 affected relatives in a FPC kindred, and we found c.103G>A to be a recurrent SMG1 variant associating with PC in both the discovery and validation series. These results suggest that SMG1 is a novel PC susceptibility gene, and we identified specific SMG1 gene variants associated with PC risk.

7 Article Evaluating Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer: ASCO Clinical Practice Provisional Clinical Opinion Summary. 2019

Stoffel, Elena M / McKernin, Shannon E / Khorana, Alok A. ·1 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. · 2 American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA. · 3 Cleveland Clinic-Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland, OH. ·J Oncol Pract · Pubmed #30589608.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Article Whole Genome Sequencing Defines the Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Pancreatic Cancer. 2016

Roberts, Nicholas J / Norris, Alexis L / Petersen, Gloria M / Bondy, Melissa L / Brand, Randall / Gallinger, Steven / Kurtz, Robert C / Olson, Sara H / Rustgi, Anil K / Schwartz, Ann G / Stoffel, Elena / Syngal, Sapna / Zogopoulos, George / Ali, Syed Z / Axilbund, Jennifer / Chaffee, Kari G / Chen, Yun-Ching / Cote, Michele L / Childs, Erica J / Douville, Christopher / Goes, Fernando S / Herman, Joseph M / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine / Kramer, Melissa / Makohon-Moore, Alvin / McCombie, Richard W / McMahon, K Wyatt / Niknafs, Noushin / Parla, Jennifer / Pirooznia, Mehdi / Potash, James B / Rhim, Andrew D / Smith, Alyssa L / Wang, Yuxuan / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Wood, Laura D / Zandi, Peter P / Goggins, Michael / Karchin, Rachel / Eshleman, James R / Papadopoulos, Nickolas / Kinzler, Kenneth W / Vogelstein, Bert / Hruban, Ralph H / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Ludwig Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, Departments of Medicine and Genetics, Pancreatic Cancer Translational Center of Excellence, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Population Sciences Division, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Gastroenterology Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Institute for Computational Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York. · Ludwig Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York. inGenious Targeting Laboratory, Ronkonkoma, New York. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. · Division of Gastroenterology, Departments of Medicine and Genetics, Pancreatic Cancer Translational Center of Excellence, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Department of Surgery, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Medicine, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Ludwig Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. ·Cancer Discov · Pubmed #26658419.

ABSTRACT: SIGNIFICANCE: The genetic basis of disease susceptibility in the majority of patients with familial pancreatic cancer is unknown. We whole genome sequenced 638 patients with familial pancreatic cancer and demonstrate that the genetic underpinning of inherited pancreatic cancer is highly heterogeneous. This has significant implications for the management of patients with familial pancreatic cancer.