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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Serena Stigliano
Based on 5 articles published since 2009
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Serena Stigliano wrote the following 5 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Do pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis share the same genetic risk factors? A PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium investigation. 2018

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Capurso, Gabriele / Hackert, Thilo / Di Leo, Milena / Izbicki, Jakob R / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Gioffreda, Domenica / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Pasquali, Claudio / Macinga, Peter / Kaaks, Rudolf / Stigliano, Serena / Peeters, Petra H / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Vodicka, Pavel / Valente, Roberto / Vashist, Yogesh K / Salvia, Roberto / Papaconstantinou, Ioannis / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Valsuani, Chiara / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Gazouli, Maria / Valantiene, Irena / Niesen, Willem / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Hara, Kazuo / Soucek, Pavel / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Johnson, Theron / Brenner, Herman / Tavano, Francesca / Fogar, Paola / Ito, Hidemi / Sperti, Cosimo / Butterbach, Katja / Latiano, Anna / Andriulli, Angelo / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Busch, Olivier R C / Dijk, Frederike / Greenhalf, William / Matsuo, Keitaro / Lombardo, Carlo / Strobel, Oliver / König, Anna-Katharina / Cuk, Katarina / Strothmann, Hendrik / Katzke, Verena / Cantore, Maurizio / Mambrini, Andrea / Oliverius, Martin / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Landi, Stefano / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Sciences and Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Visceral Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Second Department of Surgery, Aretaieion Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Massa and Carrara, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Epidemiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Institute for Health Research, Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28913878.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a very aggressive tumor with a five-year survival of less than 6%. Chronic pancreatitis (CP), an inflammatory process in of the pancreas, is a strong risk factor for PDAC. Several genetic polymorphisms have been discovered as susceptibility loci for both CP and PDAC. Since CP and PDAC share a consistent number of epidemiologic risk factors, the aim of this study was to investigate whether specific CP risk loci also contribute to PDAC susceptibility. We selected five common SNPs (rs11988997, rs379742, rs10273639, rs2995271 and rs12688220) that were identified as susceptibility markers for CP and analyzed them in 2,914 PDAC cases, 356 CP cases and 5,596 controls retrospectively collected in the context of the international PANDoRA consortium. We found a weak association between the minor allele of the PRSS1-PRSS2-rs10273639 and an increased risk of developing PDAC (OR

2 Article Exclusive and Combined Use of Statins and Aspirin and the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: a Case-Control Study. 2017

Archibugi, Livia / Piciucchi, Matteo / Stigliano, Serena / Valente, Roberto / Zerboni, Giulia / Barucca, Viola / Milella, Michele / Maisonneuve, Patrick / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena (IFO), Rome, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. gabriele.capurso@gmail.com. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #29026148.

ABSTRACT: Data on the association between aspirin and statin use and Pancreatic Ductal AdenoCarcinoma (PDAC) risk are conflicting. These drugs are often co-prescribed, but no studies evaluated the potential combined or confounding effect of the two at the same time. We aimed to investigate the association between aspirin and statin exclusive and combined use and PDAC occurrence. Data on environmental factors, family and medical history were screened in a case-control study. PDAC cases were matched to controls for age and gender. Power calculation performed ahead. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals(CI) were obtained from multivariable logistic regression analysis. In 408 PDAC patients and 816 matched controls, overall statin (OR 0.61; 95%CI,0.43-0.88), but not aspirin use was associated to reduced PDAC risk. Compared to non-users, exclusive statin (OR 0.51; 95%CI,0.32-0.80) and exclusive aspirin users (OR 0.64; 95%CI,0.40-1.01) had reduced PDAC risk. Concomitant statin and aspirin use did not further reduce the risk compared with statin use alone and no interaction was evident. Statin protective association was dose-dependent, and consistent in most subgroups, being stronger in smokers, elderly, obese and non-diabetic patients. The present study suggests that statin use is associated to reduced PDAC risk, supporting a chemopreventive action of statins on PDAC.

3 Article The Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio at Diagnosis Is Significantly Associated with Survival in Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Patients. 2017

Piciucchi, Matteo / Stigliano, Serena / Archibugi, Livia / Zerboni, Giulia / Signoretti, Marianna / Barucca, Viola / Valente, Roberto / Fave, Gianfranco Delle / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. matteopiciucchi@libero.it. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. seri_stigliano@yahoo.it. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. livia.archibugi@hotmail.it. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. giulia.zerboni@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. mariannasignoretti@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. viola.barucca@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. robbie.valente@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. gianfranco.dellefave@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. gabriele.capurso@gmail.com. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #28353661.

ABSTRACT: Different inflammation-based scores such as the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), the Odonera Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI), the Glasgow Prognostic Score, the platelet/lymphocyte ratio, and the C-reactive protein/albumin ratio have been found to be significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (PDAC) prognosis. However, most studies have investigated patients undergoing surgery, and few of them have compared these scores. We aimed at evaluating the association between inflammatory-based scores and PDAC prognosis. In a single center cohort study, inflammatory-based scores were assessed at diagnosis and their prognostic relevance as well as that of clinic-pathological variables were evaluated through multiple logistic regression and survival probability analysis. In 206 patients, age, male sex, tumor size, presence of distant metastasis, access to chemotherapy, and an NLR > 5 but not other scores were associated with overall survival (OS) at multivariate analysis. Patients with an NLR < 5 had a median survival of 12 months compared to 4 months in those with an NLR > 5. In the 81 patients with distant metastasis at diagnosis, an NLR > 5 resulted in the only variable significantly associated with survival. Among patients with metastatic disease who received chemotherapy, the median survival was 3 months in patients with an NLR > 5 and 7 months in those with an NLR < 5. The NLR might drive therapeutic options in PDAC patients, especially in the setting of metastatic disease.

4 Article Risk for Colorectal Adenomas Among Patients with Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms: a Prospective Case-Control Study. 2015

Panic, Nikola / Capurso, Gabriele / Attili, Fabia / Vitale, Giovanna / Stigliano, Serena / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Leoncini, Emanuele / Bulajic, Milutin / Di Giulio, Emilio / Costamagna, Guido / Boccia, Stefania / Larghi, Alberto. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit;Institute of Public Health, Section of Hygiene, Catholic University; Rome, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome , Rome, Italy. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit; Rome, Italy. · Institute of Public Health, Section of Hygiene, Catholic University; Rome, Italy. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit; Rome, Italy. albertolarghi@yahoo.it. ·J Gastrointestin Liver Dis · Pubmed #26697570.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: It has been reported that patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas are at an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate whether patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are at a higher risk of colorectal adenomas with respect to the general population, as this condition represents the precursor of sporadic colorectal cancer. METHODS: A case-control study was conducted at the Catholic University and University Sapienza, Rome, Italy. The cases were patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms without history of colorectal cancer, who had underwent screening colonoscopy for the first time. The controls were individuals who had underwent first time colonoscopy for screening or evaluation of non-specific abdominal symptoms. Chi-square and Fisher tests were used to compare the distributions of categorical variables. RESULTS: We enrolled 122 cases and 246 controls. Colorectal polyps were found in 52 cases (42.6%) and 79 controls (32.1%) (p<0.05). In 29 cases (23.8%) and 57 controls (23.2%) histological examination disclosed adenomatous polyps (p=0.90). There was no difference between the groups in relation to the presence of polyps with low-grade (19.7% vs. 19.8%, p=0.98) and high-grade dysplasia (4.9% vs. 4.5%, p=0.85). CONCLUSION: Patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas are not at an increased risk for the development of adenomatous colorectal polyps.

5 Article Early onset pancreatic cancer: risk factors, presentation and outcome. 2015

Piciucchi, Matteo / Capurso, Gabriele / Valente, Roberto / Larghi, Alberto / Archibugi, Livia / Signoretti, Marianna / Stigliano, Serena / Zerboni, Giulia / Barucca, Viola / La Torre, Marco / Cavallini, Marco / Costamagna, Guido / Marchetti, Paolo / Ziparo, Vincenzo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · Endoscopy Division, Gemelli Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Catholic University of Rome, Italy. · Oncology Department, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · General Surgery Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. Electronic address: gianfranco.dellefave@uniroma1.it. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #25708929.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: About 10% of pancreatic cancer patients are aged ≤50 at diagnosis and defined as Early Onset Pancreatic Cancer (EOPC). There is limited information regarding risk factors for EOPC occurrence and their outcome. AIM: To investigate risk factors, presentation features and outcome of EOPC patients. METHODS: Consecutive, histologically confirmed, pancreatic cancer patients enrolled. Data regarding environmental and genetic risk factors, clinical and pathological information, treatment and survival were recorded. EOPC patients (aged ≤50 at diagnosis) were compared to older subjects. RESULTS: Twenty-five of 293 patients (8.5%) had EOPC. There was no difference regarding sex distribution, medical conditions and alcohol intake between EOPC and older subjects. EOPC patients were more frequently current smokers (56% vs 28% p = 0.001) and started smoking at a significantly lower mean age (19.8 years, 95%CI 16.7-22.9) as compared to older patients (26.1, 95%CI 24.2-28) (p = 0.001). Current smoking (OR 7.5; 95%CI 1.8-30; p = 0.004) and age at smoking initiation (OR 0.8 for every increasing year; 95%CI 0.7-0.9; p = 0.01) were significant and independent risk factors for diagnosis of EOPC. There were no differences regarding genetic syndromes and pancreatic cancer family history. EOCP presented less frequently with jaundice (16% vs 44%, p = 0.006) and had a higher rate of unresectable disease, albeit not significantly (84% vs 68%, p = 0.1). EOPC patients were more frequently fit for surgery or chemotherapy than their counterpart, resulting in similar stage-specific survival probability. CONCLUSION: EOPC seems related to active and early smoking but not to familial syndromes. Young patients display aggressive disease but not worse outcome.