Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Magdalena Stepien
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Magdalena Stepien wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Pancreatic cancer risk is modulated by inflammatory potential of diet and ABO genotype: a consortia-based evaluation and replication study. 2018

Antwi, Samuel O / Bamlet, William R / Pedersen, Katrina S / Chaffee, Kari G / Risch, Harvey A / Shivappa, Nitin / Steck, Susan E / Anderson, Kristin E / Bracci, Paige M / Polesel, Jerry / Serraino, Diego / La Vecchia, Carlo / Bosetti, Cristina / Li, Donghui / Oberg, Ann L / Arslan, Alan A / Albanes, Demetrius / Duell, Eric J / Huybrechts, Inge / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Hoover, Robert / Mannisto, Satu / Chanock, Stephen J / Zheng, Wei / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Stepien, Magdalena / Canzian, Federico / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Quirós, José Ramon / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Bruinsma, Fiona / Milne, Roger L / Giles, Graham G / Hébert, James R / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Petersen, Gloria M. ·Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Division of Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA. · Cancer Prevention and Control Program, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (PN), Italy. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, IRCCS-Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute-IDIBELL, Catalan Institute of Oncology-ICO. L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, France. · Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare Helsinki, Finland. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, UK. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Pantai Valley, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, and Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Global and Population Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #29800239.

ABSTRACT: Diets with high inflammatory potential are suspected to increase risk for pancreatic cancer (PC). Using pooled analyses, we examined whether this association applies to populations from different geographic regions and population subgroups with varying risks for PC, including variation in ABO blood type. Data from six case-control studies (cases, n = 2414; controls, n = 4528) in the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) were analyzed, followed by replication in five nested case-control studies (cases, n = 1268; controls, n = 4215) from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan). Two polymorphisms in the ABO locus (rs505922 and rs8176746) were used to infer participants' blood types. Dietary questionnaire-derived nutrient/food intake was used to compute energy-adjusted dietary inflammatory index (E-DII®) scores to assess inflammatory potential of diet. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. Higher E-DII scores, reflecting greater inflammatory potential of diet, were associated with increased PC risk in PanC4 [ORQ5 versus Q1=2.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.85-2.61, Ptrend < 0.0001; ORcontinuous = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.17-1.24], and PanScan (ORQ5 versus Q1 = 1.23, 95% CI = 0.92-1.66, Ptrend = 0.008; ORcontinuous = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.02-1.15). As expected, genotype-derived non-O blood type was associated with increased PC risk in both the PanC4 and PanScan studies. Stratified analyses of associations between E-DII quintiles and PC by genotype-derived ABO blood type did not show interaction by blood type (Pinteraction = 0.10 in PanC4 and Pinteraction=0.13 in PanScan). The results show that consuming a pro-inflammatory diet and carrying non-O blood type are each individually, but not interactively, associated with increased PC risk.

2 Article Sweet-beverage consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). 2016

Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva M / Wark, Petra A / Romaguera, Dora / Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala / Michaud, Dominique / Molina-Montes, Esther / Tjønneland, Anne / Olsen, Anja / Overvad, Kim / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Fagherazzi, Guy / Katzke, Verena A / Kühn, Tilman / Steffen, Annika / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Klinaki, Eleni / Papatesta, Eleni-Maria / Masala, Giovanna / Krogh, Vittorio / Tumino, Rosario / Naccarati, Alessio / Mattiello, Amalia / Peeters, Petra H / Rylander, Charlotta / Parr, Christine L / Skeie, Guri / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Quirós, J Ramón / Duell, Eric J / Dorronsoro, Miren / Huerta, José María / Ardanaz, Eva / Wareham, Nick / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Travis, Ruth C / Key, Tim / Stepien, Magdalena / Freisling, Heinz / Riboli, Elio / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas. ·Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Miguel Hernández University, Alicante, Spain; The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; · Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Medical Research Institute of Palma, University Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain; mariaadoracion.romaguera@ssib.es. · Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; · Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Andalusian School of Public Health. Biomedical Research Institute of Granada; University Hospital of Granada/Granada University, Granada, Spain; · Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark; · Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark; · Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health team, National Institute for Health and Medical Research, Villejuif, France; UMRS 1018, Université Paris Sud, Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany; · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany; · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece; Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece; · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece; · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy; · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit. Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy; · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Italy; · Human Genetics Foundation,Torino, Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Torino, Italy; · Dipartamento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy; · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Netherlands; · Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø-the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; · Department of Chronic Diseases, Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; · Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø-the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, Finland; · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain; · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Public Health Direction Biodonostia Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Navarre Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; · Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit. · Department of Public Health and Primary Care, and Clinical Gerontology Unit, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; · Nutrition and Metabolism Section, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France; · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands; and. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands; and Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center, Utrecht, Netherlands. ·Am J Clin Nutr · Pubmed #27510540.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The consumption of sweet beverages has been associated with greater risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity, which may be involved in the development of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that sweet beverages may increase pancreatic cancer risk as well. OBJECTIVE: We examined the association between sweet-beverage consumption (including total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drink and juice and nectar consumption) and pancreatic cancer risk. DESIGN: The study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. A total of 477,199 participants (70.2% women) with a mean age of 51 y at baseline were included, and 865 exocrine pancreatic cancers were diagnosed after a median follow-up of 11.60 y (IQR: 10.10-12.60 y). Sweet-beverage consumption was assessed with the use of validated dietary questionnaires at baseline. HRs and 95% CIs were obtained with the use of multivariable Cox regression models that were stratified by age, sex, and center and adjusted for educational level, physical activity, smoking status, and alcohol consumption. Associations with total soft-drink consumption were adjusted for juice and nectar consumption and vice versa. RESULTS: Total soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.07), sugar-sweetened soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.02; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.08), and artificially sweetened soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.10) were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption was inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk (HR per 100 g/d: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84, 0.99); this association remained statistically significant after adjustment for body size, type 2 diabetes, and energy intake. CONCLUSIONS: Soft-drink consumption does not seem to be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption might be associated with a modest decreased pancreatic cancer risk. Additional studies with specific information on juice and nectar subtypes are warranted to clarify these results.

3 Article Leukocyte telomere length in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a prospective study. 2014

Campa, Daniele / Mergarten, Björn / De Vivo, Immaculata / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Racine, Antoine / Severi, Gianluca / Nieters, Alexandra / Katzke, Verena A / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Yiannakouris, Nikos / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Boeing, Heiner / Quirós, J Ramón / Duell, Eric J / Molina-Montes, Esther / Huerta, José María / Ardanaz, Eva / Dorronsoro, Miren / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nicholas / Travis, Ruth C / Palli, Domenico / Pala, Valeria / Tumino, Rosario / Naccarati, Alessio / Panico, Salvatore / Vineis, Paolo / Riboli, Elio / Siddiq, Afshan / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Peeters, Petra H / Nilsson, Peter M / Sund, Malin / Ye, Weimin / Lund, Eiliv / Jareid, Mie / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Duarte-Salles, Talita / Kong, So Yeon / Stepien, Magdalena / Canzian, Federico / Kaaks, Rudolf. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Program in Genetic Epidemiology and Statistical Genetics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), Centre for research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones, and Women's Health team, Villejuif, France. Univ Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France. IGR, Villejuif, France. · Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Torino, Italy. · Center for Chronic Immunodeficiency, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Harokopio University of Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment, and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada (Granada.ibs), Granada, Spain. CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, Murcia, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. Navarre Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Direction and Biodonostia-Ciberesp Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain. · University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute, ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Ragusa, Italy. · Dipartimento Di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Genomics of Common Disease, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö Sweden. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, Finland. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. r.kaaks@dkfz.de. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #25103821.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Several studies have examined leukocyte telomere length (LTL) as a possible predictor for cancer at various organ sites. The hypothesis originally motivating many of these studies was that shorter telomeres would be associated with an increase in cancer risk; the results of epidemiologic studies have been inconsistent, however, and suggested positive, negative, or null associations. Two studies have addressed the association of LTL in relation to pancreatic cancer risk and the results are contrasting. METHODS: We measured LTL in a prospective study of 331 pancreatic cancer cases and 331 controls in the context of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). RESULTS: We observed that the mean LTL was higher in cases (0.59 ± 0.20) than in controls (0.57 ± 0.17), although this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.07), and a basic logistic regression model showed no association of LTL with pancreas cancer risk. When adjusting for levels of HbA1c and C-peptide, however, there was a weakly positive association between longer LTL and pancreatic cancer risk [OR, 1.13; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.27]. Additional analyses by cubic spline regression suggested a possible nonlinear relationship between LTL and pancreatic cancer risk (P = 0.022), with a statistically nonsignificant increase in risk at very low LTL, as well as a significant increase at high LTL. CONCLUSION: Taken together, the results from our study do not support LTL as a uniform and strong predictor of pancreatic cancer. IMPACT: The results of this article can provide insights into telomere dynamics and highlight the complex relationship between LTL and pancreatic cancer risk.