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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Nicola Sperandio
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Nicola Sperandio wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article CD200 expression is a feature of solid pseudopapillary neoplasms of the pancreas. 2019

Lawlor, Rita T / Daprà, Valentina / Girolami, Ilaria / Pea, Antonio / Pilati, Camilla / Nottegar, Alessia / Piccoli, Paola / Parolini, Claudia / Sperandio, Nicola / Capelli, Paola / Scarpa, Aldo / Luchini, Claudio. ·ARC-Net Research Center, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Piazzale Scuro, 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Personalized Medicine, Pharmacogenomics, Therapeutic Optimization, Paris-Descartes University, Paris, France. · Department of Surgery, Section of Pathology, San Bortolo Hospital, Vicenza, Italy. · ARC-Net Research Center, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. aldo.scarpa@univr.it. · Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Piazzale Scuro, 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. aldo.scarpa@univr.it. ·Virchows Arch · Pubmed #30132130.

ABSTRACT: CD200 has been recently indicated as a robust marker of well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms. Here, we evaluate its role in differential diagnosis of solid pancreatic neoplasms. We immunostained for CD200 22 solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs), 8 acinar carcinomas (ACs), 2 pancreatoblastomas (PBs), 138 neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs), and 48 ductal adenocarcinomas. All SPNs showed strong cytoplasmic and membranous staining for CD200, while only one case of AC had focal positivity. The two PBs showed focal CD200 positivity, mainly located in squamoid nests. The vast majority of PanNETs (96%) showed strong cytoplasmic and membranous staining for CD200, whereas all PDACs were negative. As both PanNETs and SPNs express CD200, it has no role in the differential diagnosis between these two entities.

2 Article PD-1, PD-L1, and CD163 in pancreatic undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells: expression patterns and clinical implications. 2018

Luchini, Claudio / Cros, Jerome / Pea, Antonio / Pilati, Camilla / Veronese, Nicola / Rusev, Borislav / Capelli, Paola / Mafficini, Andrea / Nottegar, Alessia / Brosens, Lodewijk A A / Noë, Michaël / Offerhaus, G Johan A / Chianchiano, Peter / Riva, Giulio / Piccoli, Paola / Parolini, Claudia / Malleo, Giuseppe / Lawlor, Rita T / Corbo, Vincenzo / Sperandio, Nicola / Barbareschi, Mattia / Fassan, Matteo / Cheng, Liang / Wood, Laura D / Scarpa, Aldo. ·Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Beaujon Hospital, 92110 Clichy, France; Paris-Diderot School of Medicine, Inflammation Research Center, 75013 Paris, France. · Department of Surgery, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. · Personalized Medicine, Pharmacogenomics, Therapeutic Optimization, Paris-Descartes University, 75006 Paris, France. · National Institute of Gastroenterology-Research Hospital, IRCCS "S. de Bellis," 70013, Castellana Grotte, Bari, Italy. · ARC-Net Research Center, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Section of Pathology, San Bortolo Hospital, 36100 Vicenza, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3508 Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Pathology, Radboud University Medical Center, 6500, HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21211, USA. · Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3508 Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Surgical Pathology Unit, Santa Chiara Hospital, 38122 Trento, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21211, USA; Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21211, USA. Electronic address: ldwood@jhmi.edu. · Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy; ARC-Net Research Center, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. Electronic address: aldo.scarpa@univr.it. ·Hum Pathol · Pubmed #30031096.

ABSTRACT: Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells (UCOGC), a variant of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), has a striking genetic similarity to PDAC but a significantly improved overall survival. We hypothesize that this difference could be due to the immune response to the tumor, and as such, we investigated the expression of PD-1, PD-L1, and CD163 in a series of UCOGC. To this aim, 27 pancreatic UCOGCs (11 pure and 16 PDAC-associated), 5 extrapancreatic tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells and 10 pancreatic anaplastic carcinomas were immunostained using antibodies against PD-1, PD-L1, and CD163. In pancreatic UCOGCs, PD-L1 was expressed in neoplastic cells of 17 (63%) of 27 cases, more often in cases with an associated PDAC (P = .04). Expression of PD-L1 was associated with poor prognosis, confirmed by multivariate analysis: patients with PD-L1-positive UCOGCs had a risk of all-cause mortality that was 3 times higher than did patients with PD-L1-negative UCOGCs (hazard ratio, 3.397; 95% confidence interval, 1.023-18.375; P = .034). PD-L1 expression on tumor cells was also associated with aberrant P53 expression (P = .035). PD-1 was expressed on rare lymphocytes in 12 UCOGCs (44.4%), mainly located at the tumor periphery. CD163 was expressed on histiocytes, with a diffuse and strong staining pattern in all UCOGCs. Extrapancreatic tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells showed very similar staining patterns for the same proteins. Anaplastic carcinomas have some similarities to UCOGCs, but PD-L1 has no prognostic roles. Our results may have important implications for immunotherapeutic strategies in UCOGCs; these tumors may also represent a model for future therapeutic approaches against PDAC.

3 Article Evaluation of cell-free DNA as a biomarker for pancreatic malignancies. 2015

Sikora, Katarzyna / Bedin, Chiara / Vicentini, Caterina / Malpeli, Giorgio / D'Angelo, Edoardo / Sperandio, Nicola / Lawlor, Rita T / Bassi, Claudio / Tortora, Giampaolo / Nitti, Donato / Agostini, Marco / Fassan, Matteo / Scarpa, Aldo. ·ARC-NET Research Centre, University of Verona, Verona - Italy. ·Int J Biol Markers · Pubmed #24832178.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Currently, no reliable blood-based assay for early detection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is available. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) quantitation in patients' plasma has been recently applied in monitoring several cancer types. This study evaluates the diagnostic potential of cfDNA in PDAC patients. METHODS: Plasma cfDNA levels and integrity ratio were assayed using quantitative real-time PCR of Alu-repeat amplicons in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n=50), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (n=23), and chronic pancreatitis (n=20), as well as in healthy volunteers without evidence of pancreatic disease (n=23). RESULTS: The total load of cfDNA, obtained by Alu83 quantitation, was the highest in PDAC patients than in any of the other patient groups (Welch t test; p<0.001) and was an average predictor of PDAC disease (AUC=0.664; CI, 0.56-0.77). A nonlinear association between Alu83 levels and subjects' age was detected (Spearman's rho=0.35; p<0.001) in the overall population, as well as within the PDAC patients' group (Spearman's rho=0.47; p<0.001). Necrosis-derived cfDNA fragments, quantitated with the Alu244 amplicon, were barely detectable in any of the samples and, in that respect, comparable between the different subject groups. CfDNA integrity estimation (Alu244/Alu83 ratio) was significantly affected by the limited detectability of plasma Alu244 levels. CONCLUSION: The lack of detectable levels of necrosis-derived cfDNA in pancreatic pathologies considerably affects the clinical use of such biomarker in PDAC patients. Different methods of analysis should be applied in the evaluation of the cfDNA diagnostic value in pancreas pathology.

4 Article Urine metabolic signature of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma by (1)h nuclear magnetic resonance: identification, mapping, and evolution. 2012

Napoli, Claudia / Sperandio, Nicola / Lawlor, Rita T / Scarpa, Aldo / Molinari, Henriette / Assfalg, Michael. ·Department of Biotechnology and, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·J Proteome Res · Pubmed #22066465.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a dismal prognosis and is highly chemoresistant. Early detection is the only means to impact long-term survival, but screening methods are lacking. Given the complex and heterogeneous nature of pancreatic cancer, unbiased analytical methods such as metabolomics by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy show promise to identify disease-specific molecular fingerprints. NMR profiles constitute a fingerprint of the biofluid, reporting quantitatively on all detectable small biomolecules. NMR spectroscopy was applied to investigate the urine metabolome of PDAC patients (n = 33) and to detect altered metabolic profiles in comparison with healthy matched controls (n = 54). The spectral data were analyzed using multivariate statistical techniques. Statistically significant differences were found between urine metabolomic profiles of PDAC and control individuals (p < 10(-5)). Group discrimination was possible due to average concentration differences of several metabolite signals, pointing to a multimolecular signature of the disease. The robustness of the determined statistical model is confirmed by its predictive performance (sensitivity = 75.8%, specificity = 90.7%). Additionally, the method allowed for a neat separation between spectral profiles of individuals with intermediate and advanced pathologic staging, as well as for the discrimination of samples based on tumor localization. NMR spectroscopy analysis of urinary metabolic profiles proved successful in identifying a complex molecular signature of PDAC. Furthermore, results of a descriptive-level analysis show the possibility to follow disease evolution and to carry out tumor site mapping. Given the high reproducibility and the noninvasive nature of the analytical procedure, the described method bears potential to impact large-scale screening programs.