Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Halfdan Sorbye
Based on 11 articles published since 2009
(Why 11 articles?)
||||

Between 2009 and 2019, H. Sorbye wrote the following 11 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline ENETS Consensus Guidelines for High-Grade Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors and Neuroendocrine Carcinomas. 2016

Garcia-Carbonero, R / Sorbye, H / Baudin, E / Raymond, E / Wiedenmann, B / Niederle, B / Sedlackova, E / Toumpanakis, C / Anlauf, M / Cwikla, J B / Caplin, M / O'Toole, D / Perren, A / Anonymous6950853. ·Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario Doce de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #26731334.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline Nordic guidelines 2014 for diagnosis and treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2014

Janson, Eva Tiensuu / Sorbye, Halfdan / Welin, Staffan / Federspiel, Birgitte / Grønbæk, Henning / Hellman, Per / Ladekarl, Morten / Langer, Seppo W / Mortensen, Jann / Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla / Sundin, Anders / Sundlöv, Anna / Thiis-Evensen, Espen / Knigge, Ulrich. ·Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden * ·Acta Oncol · Pubmed #25140861.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The diagnostic work-up and treatment of patients with neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) has undergone major recent advances and new methods are currently introduced into the clinic. An update of the WHO classification has resulted in a new nomenclature dividing NENs into neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) including G1 (Ki67 index ≤ 2%) and G2 (Ki67 index 3-20%) tumours and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) with Ki67 index > 20%, G3. Aim. These Nordic guidelines summarise the Nordic Neuroendocrine Tumour Group's current view on how to diagnose and treat NEN-patients and are meant to be useful in the daily practice for clinicians handling these patients.

3 Guideline Nordic Guidelines 2010 for diagnosis and treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. 2010

Janson, Eva Tiensuu / Sørbye, Halfdan / Welin, Staffan / Federspiel, Birgitte / Grønbaek, Henning / Hellman, Per / Mathisen, Oystein / Mortensen, Jann / Sundin, Anders / Thiis-Evensen, Espen / Välimäki, Matti J / Oberg, Kjell / Knigge, Ulrich. ·Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Tiensuu_Janson@medsci.uu.se ·Acta Oncol · Pubmed #20553100.

ABSTRACT: The diagnostic work-up and treatment of patients with neuroendocrine tumours has undergone a major change during the last decade. New diagnostic possibilities and treatment options have been developed. These Nordic guidelines, written by a group with a major interest in the subject, summarises our current view on how to diagnose and treat these patients. The guidelines are meant to be useful in the daily practice for clinicians handling patients with neuroendocrine tumours.

4 Review The Problem of High-Grade Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: Well-Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumors, Neuroendocrine Carcinomas, and Beyond. 2018

Sorbye, Halfdan / Baudin, Eric / Perren, Aurel. ·Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Jonas Lies vei 65, Bergen 5021, Norway; Department of Clinical Science, Haukeland University Hospital, Jonas Lies vei 65, Bergen 5021, Norway. Electronic address: halfdan.sorbye@helse-bergen.no. · Endocrine Oncology, Gustave Roussy, rue Édouard-Vaillant 114, Villejuif 94800, France. · Department of Pathology, University of Bern, Murtenstrasse 31, Bern 3008, Switzerland. ·Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am · Pubmed #30098724.

ABSTRACT: High-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms are well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors or poorly differentiated small/large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Distinguishing these entities relies on different genetic backgrounds and resulting different biology. The new classification creates several problems. Almost all clinical treatment data on neuroendocrine neoplasms do not stratify between well and poorly differentiated, providing insufficient help in treatment selection. Treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms should separate between well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors and neuroendocrine carcinoma, and depends on primary tumor site, stage, proliferation rate, and clinical course. This article addresses how to diagnose and treat gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, focusing on well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors versus neuroendocrine carcinomas.

5 Review Gastroenteropancreatic high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma. 2014

Sorbye, Halfdan / Strosberg, Jonathan / Baudin, Eric / Klimstra, David S / Yao, James C. ·Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. ·Cancer · Pubmed #24771552.

ABSTRACT: Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine neoplasms are classified as low-grade, intermediate-grade, and high-grade tumors based on morphologic criteria and the proliferation rate. Most studies have been conducted in patients with well differentiated (low-grade to intermediate-grade) neuroendocrine tumors. Data are substantially scarcer on poorly differentiated, high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC), which includes the entities of small cell carcinoma and large cell NEC. A literature search of GEP-NEC was performed. Long-term survival was poor even among patients who presented with localized disease. Several studies highlighted heterogeneity within the high-grade NEC category and a need for the further identification of discreet prognostic and predictive groups. Tumors with a Ki-67 proliferation index <55% were less responsive to platinum-based chemotherapy, and patients with such tumors or with well differentiated morphology had better survival than patients who had tumors with poorly differentiated morphology or a higher Ki-67 index. Treatment options beyond platinum-based chemotherapy are emerging. A revision of the World Health Organization high-grade NEC classification seems to be necessary based on recent data. Platinum-based chemotherapy may not be the optimal treatment for patients who have GEP-NEC with a moderately high proliferation rate. Adequate diagnostic and prognostic stratifications constitute the basis for future progress.

6 Clinical Trial Neoadjuvant chemotherapy versus surgery first for resectable pancreatic cancer (Norwegian Pancreatic Cancer Trial - 1 (NorPACT-1)) - study protocol for a national multicentre randomized controlled trial. 2017

Labori, Knut Jørgen / Lassen, Kristoffer / Hoem, Dag / Grønbech, Jon Erik / Søreide, Jon Arne / Mortensen, Kim / Smaaland, Rune / Sorbye, Halfdan / Verbeke, Caroline / Dueland, Svein. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. uxknab@ous-hf.no. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Acute and Digestive Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. · Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. · Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Gastrointestinal and Hepatobiliary Surgery, University Hospital of Northern Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Haematology and Oncology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Clinical Science, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ·BMC Surg · Pubmed #28841916.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death. While surgical resection remains the foundation for potentially curative treatment, survival benefit is achieved with adjuvant oncological treatment. Thus, completion of multimodality treatment (surgical resection and (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy) to all patients and early treatment of micrometastatic disease is the ideal goal. NorPACT-1 aims to test the hypothesis that overall mortality at one year after allocation of treatment can be reduced with neoadjuvant chemotherapy in surgically treated patients with resectable pancreatic cancer. METHODS/DESIGN: The NorPACT- 1 is a multicentre, randomized controlled phase III trial organized by the Norwegian Gastrointestinal Cancer Group for Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary cancer. Patients with resectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head are randomized to receive either surgery first (Group 1: SF/control) or neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Group 2: NT/intervention) with four cycles FOLFIRINOX followed by resection. Both groups receive adjuvant chemotherapy with gemicitabine and capecitabine (six cycles in Group 1, four cycles in Group 2). In total 90 patients will be randomized in all the five Norwegian university hospitals performing pancreatic surgery. Primary endpoint is overall mortality at one year following commencement of treatment for those who ultimately undergo resection. Secondary endpoints are overall survival after date of randomization (intention to treat), overall survival after resection, disease-free survival, histopathological response, complication rates after surgery, feasibility of neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy, completion rates of all parts of multimodal treatment, and quality-of-life. Bolt-on to the study is a translational research program that aims at identifying factors that are predictive of response to NT, the risk of distant cancer spread, and patient outcome. DISCUSSION: NorPACT- 1 is designed to investigate the additional benefit of NT compared to standard treatment only (surgery + adjuvant chemotherapy) for resectable cancer of the pancreatic head to decrease early mortality (within one year) in resected patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Trial open for accrual 01.02.2017. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02919787 . Date of registration: September 14, 2016.

7 Clinical Trial A human clinical trial using ultrasound and microbubbles to enhance gemcitabine treatment of inoperable pancreatic cancer. 2016

Dimcevski, Georg / Kotopoulis, Spiros / Bjånes, Tormod / Hoem, Dag / Schjøtt, Jan / Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore / Biermann, Martin / Molven, Anders / Sorbye, Halfdan / McCormack, Emmet / Postema, Michiel / Gilja, Odd Helge. ·National Centre for Ultrasound in Gastroenterology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: Georg.dimcevski@helse-bergen.no. · National Centre for Ultrasound in Gastroenterology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Section of Clinical Pharmacology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Surgical Sciences, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway. · Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Section of Clinical Pharmacology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Centre for Cancer Biomarkers, CCBIO, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Department of Internal Medicine, Hematology Section, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Pathology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Gade Laboratory for Pathology, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Department of Internal Medicine, Hematology Section, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa, Poland; School of Electrical and Information Engineering, Chamber of Mines Building, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. ·J Control Release · Pubmed #27744037.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The primary aim of our study was to evaluate the safety and potential toxicity of gemcitabine combined with microbubbles under sonication in inoperable pancreatic cancer patients. The secondary aim was to evaluate a novel image-guided microbubble-based therapy, based on commercially available technology, towards improving chemotherapeutic efficacy, preserving patient performance status, and prolonging survival. METHODS: Ten patients were enrolled and treated in this Phase I clinical trial. Gemcitabine was infused intravenously over 30min. Subsequently, patients were treated using a commercial clinical ultrasound scanner for 31.5min. SonoVue® was injected intravenously (0.5ml followed by 5ml saline every 3.5min) during the ultrasound treatment with the aim of inducing sonoporation, thus enhancing therapeutic efficacy. RESULTS: The combined therapeutic regimen did not induce any additional toxicity or increased frequency of side effects when compared to gemcitabine chemotherapy alone (historical controls). Combination treated patients (n=10) tolerated an increased number of gemcitabine cycles compared with historical controls (n=63 patients; average of 8.3±6.0cycles, versus 13.8±5.6cycles, p=0.008, unpaired t-test). In five patients, the maximum tumour diameter was decreased from the first to last treatment. The median survival in our patients (n=10) was also increased from 8.9months to 17.6months (p=0.011). CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to combine ultrasound, microbubbles, and chemotherapy in a clinical setting using commercially available equipment with no additional toxicities. This combined treatment may improve the clinical efficacy of gemcitabine, prolong the quality of life, and extend survival in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

8 Article Intravenous versus oral etoposide: efficacy and correlation to clinical outcome in patients with high-grade metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (WHO G3). 2018

Ali, Abir Salwa / Grönberg, Malin / Langer, Seppo W / Ladekarl, Morten / Hjortland, Geir Olav / Vestermark, Lene Weber / Österlund, Pia / Welin, Staffan / Grønbæk, Henning / Knigge, Ulrich / Sorbye, Halfdan / Janson, Eva Tiensuu. ·Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. abir.ali@medsci.uu.se. · Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Departments of Surgery C and Endocrinology PE, Rigshospitalet, Faculty of Health Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Tampere University Hospital and Tampere University, Tampere, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Hospital and Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland. · Departments of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. ·Med Oncol · Pubmed #29511910.

ABSTRACT: High-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs, G3) are aggressive cancers of the digestive system with poor prognosis and survival. Platinum-based chemotherapy (cisplatin/carboplatin + etoposide) is considered the first-line palliative treatment. Etoposide is frequently administered intravenously; however, oral etoposide may be used as an alternative. Concerns for oral etoposide include decreased bioavailability, inter- and intra-patient variability and patient compliance. We aimed to evaluate possible differences in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients treated with oral etoposide compared to etoposide given as infusion. Patients (n = 236) from the Nordic NEC study were divided into three groups receiving etoposide as a long infusion (24 h, n = 170), short infusion (≤ 5 h, n = 33) or oral etoposide (n = 33) according to hospital tradition. PFS and OS were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier (log-rank), cox proportional hazard ratios and confidence intervals. No statistical differences were observed in PFS or OS when comparing patients receiving long infusion (median PFS 3.8 months, median OS 14.5 months), short infusion (PFS 5.6 months, OS 11.0 months) or oral etoposide (PFS 5.4 months, OS 11.3 months). We observed equal efficacy for the three administration routes suggesting oral etoposide may be safe and efficient in treating high-grade GEP-NEN, G3 patients scheduled for cisplatin/carboplatin + etoposide therapy.

9 Article Expression of p53 protein in high-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. 2017

Ali, Abir Salwa / Grönberg, Malin / Federspiel, Birgitte / Scoazec, Jean-Yves / Hjortland, Geir Olav / Grønbæk, Henning / Ladekarl, Morten / Langer, Seppo W / Welin, Staffan / Vestermark, Lene Weber / Arola, Johanna / Österlund, Pia / Knigge, Ulrich / Sorbye, Halfdan / Grimelius, Lars / Janson, Eva Tiensuu. ·Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Biopathology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Department of Oncology, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Hepatology & Gastroenterology, Aarhus university Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Pathology, HUSLAB, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Hospital and Helsinki University, Helsinki Finland. · Department of Oncology, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. · Department of Surgery C and Endocrinology PE, Rigshospitalet, Faculty of Health Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital and Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #29112960.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (GEP-NECs) are aggressive, rapidly proliferating tumors. Therapeutic response to current chemotherapy regimens is usually short lasting. The aim of this study was to examine the expression and potential clinical importance of immunoreactive p53 protein in GEP-NEC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Tumor tissues from 124 GEP-NEC patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease treated with platinum-based chemotherapy were collected from Nordic centers and clinical data were obtained from the Nordic NEC register. Tumor proliferation rate and differentiation were re-evaluated. All specimens were immunostained for p53 protein using a commercially available monoclonal antibody. Kaplan-Meier curves and cox regression analyses were used to assess progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). RESULTS: All tumor tissues were immunoreactive for either one or both neuroendocrine biomarkers (chromogranin A and synaptophysin) and Ki67 index was >20% in all cases. p53 immunoreactivity was only shown in 39% of the cases and was not found to be a prognostic marker for the whole cohort. However, p53 immunoreactivity was correlated with shorter PFS in patients with colorectal tumors (HR = 2.1, p = 0.03) in a univariate analysis as well as to poorer PFS (HR = 2.6, p = 0.03) and OS (HR = 3.4, p = 0.02) in patients with colorectal tumors with distant metastases, a correlation which remained significant in the multivariate analyses. CONCLUSION: In this cohort of GEP-NEC patients, p53 expression could not be correlated with clinical outcome. However, in patients with colorectal NECs, p53 expression was correlated with shorter PFS and OS. Further studies are needed to establish the role of immunoreactive p53 as a prognostic marker for GEP-NEC patients.

10 Article Results after surgical treatment of liver metastases in patients with high-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas. 2017

Galleberg, R B / Knigge, U / Tiensuu Janson, E / Vestermark, L W / Haugvik, S-P / Ladekarl, M / Langer, S W / Grønbæk, H / Österlund, P / Hjortland, G O / Assmus, J / Tang, L / Perren, A / Sorbye, H. ·Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: renate.berget.galleberg@helse-bergen.no. · Departments of Surgery C and Endocrinology PE, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: rxs484@ku.dk. · Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden. Electronic address: eva.tiensuu_janson@medsci.uu.se. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. Electronic address: lene.vestermark@syd.dk. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Norway. Electronic address: sphaugvik@yahoo.de. · Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Electronic address: mortlade@rm.dk. · Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: swlanger@dadlnet.dk. · Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Electronic address: henning.gronbaek@aarhus.rm.dk. · Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland. Electronic address: pia.osterlund@pshp.fi. · Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Norway. Electronic address: goo@ous-hf.no. · Center for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: jorg.assmus@helse-bergen.no. · Department of Pathology, MSKCC, New York, USA. Electronic address: tangl@MSKCC.ORG. · Department of Pathology, University of Bern, Switzerland. Electronic address: aurel.perren@pathology.unibe.ch. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: Halfdan.sorbye@helse-bergen.no. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #28522174.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (GEP-NEC) are generally characterized by synchronous metastases, high aggressiveness and a dismal prognosis. Current international guidelines do not recommend surgical treatment of liver metastases, however the existing data are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of curatively intended resection/radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver metastases in patients with metastatic GEP-NEC. METHODS: 32 patients with a diagnosis of high-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm (Ki-67 > 20%) and with intended curative resection/RFA of liver metastases, were identified among 840 patients from two Nordic GEP-NEC registries. Tumor morphology (well vs poor differentiation) was reassessed. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analyses for the entire cohort and for subgroups. RESULTS: Median OS after resection/RFA of liver metastases was 35.9 months (95%-CI: 20.6-51.3) with a five-year OS of 43%. The median PFS was 8.4 months (95%-CI: 3.9-13). Four patients (13%) were disease-free after 5 years. Two patients had well-differentiated morphology (NET G3) and 20 patients (63%) had Ki-67 ≥ 55%. A Ki-67 < 55% and receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were statistically significant factors of improved OS after liver resection/RFA. CONCLUSION: This study shows a long median and long term survival after liver surgery/RFA for these selected metastatic GEP-NEC patients, particularly for the group with a Ki-67 in the relatively lower G3 range. Our findings indicate a possible role for surgical treatment of liver metastases in the management of this patient population.

11 Article Surgical Treatment as a Principle for Patients with High-Grade Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: A Nordic Multicenter Comparative Study. 2016

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Janson, Eva Tiensuu / Österlund, Pia / Langer, Seppo W / Falk, Ragnhild Sørum / Labori, Knut Jørgen / Vestermark, Lene Weber / Grønbæk, Henning / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz / Sorbye, Halfdan. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. sphaugvik@yahoo.de. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. sphaugvik@yahoo.de. · Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Oslo Centre for Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark. · Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #26678407.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This study aimed to evaluate the role of surgery for patients with high-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (hgPNEC) in a large Nordic multicenter cohort study. Prior studies evaluating the role of surgery for patients with hgPNEC are limited, and the benefit of the surgery is uncertain. METHODS: Data from patients with a diagnosis of hgPNEC determined between 1998 and 2012 were retrospectively registered at 10 Nordic university hospitals. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to compare the overall survival of different treatment groups, and Cox-regression analysis was used to evaluate factors potentially influencing survival. RESULTS: The study registered 119 patients. The median survival period from the time of metastasis was 23 months for patients undergoing initial resection of localized nonmetastatic disease and chemotherapy at the time of recurrence (n = 14), 29 months for patients undergoing resection of the primary tumor and resection/radiofrequency ablation of synchronous metastatic liver disease (n = 12), and 13 months for patients with synchronous metastatic disease given systemic chemotherapy alone (n = 78). The 3-year survival rate after surgery of the primary tumor and metastatic disease was 69 %. Resection of the primary tumor was an independent factor for improved survival after occurrence of metastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with resected localized nonmetastatic hgPNEC and later metastatic disease seemed to benefit from initial resection of the primary tumor. Patients selected for resection of the primary tumor and synchronous liver metastases had a high 3-year survival rate. Selected patients with both localized hgPNEC and metastatic hgPNEC should be considered for radical surgical treatment.