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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Sarah Song
Based on 4 articles published since 2009
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Sarah Song wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Whole genomes redefine the mutational landscape of pancreatic cancer. 2015

Waddell, Nicola / Pajic, Marina / Patch, Ann-Marie / Chang, David K / Kassahn, Karin S / Bailey, Peter / Johns, Amber L / Miller, David / Nones, Katia / Quek, Kelly / Quinn, Michael C J / Robertson, Alan J / Fadlullah, Muhammad Z H / Bruxner, Tim J C / Christ, Angelika N / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Manning, Suzanne / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Wani, Shivangi / Wilson, Peter J / Markham, Emma / Cloonan, Nicole / Anderson, Matthew J / Fink, J Lynn / Holmes, Oliver / Kazakoff, Stephen H / Leonard, Conrad / Newell, Felicity / Poudel, Barsha / Song, Sarah / Taylor, Darrin / Waddell, Nick / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark J / Lee, Hong C / Jones, Marc D / Nagrial, Adnan M / Humphris, Jeremy / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Chin, Venessa / Steinmann, Angela M / Mawson, Amanda / Humphrey, Emily S / Colvin, Emily K / Chou, Angela / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia V / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Rooman, Ilse / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Pettitt, Jessica A / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Jamieson, Nigel B / Graham, Janet S / Niclou, Simone P / Bjerkvig, Rolf / Grützmann, Robert / Aust, Daniela / Hruban, Ralph H / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Corbo, Vincenzo / Bassi, Claudio / Falconi, Massimo / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Tortora, Giampaolo / Tempero, Margaret A / Anonymous400822 / Gill, Anthony J / Eshleman, James R / Pilarsky, Christian / Scarpa, Aldo / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Pearson, John V / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M. ·1] Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia [2] QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston Road, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia [3] South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia [4] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · 1] Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia [2] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] Department of Anatomical Pathology, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. · 1] Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia [2] University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia [3] Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050, Australia. · 1] Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia [2] School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Fremantle Hospital, Alma Street, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. · 1] School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Nedlands 6009, Australia [2] St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia [3] Bendat Family Comprehensive Cancer Centre, St John of God Subiaco Hospital, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · 1] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK [2] Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK [3] West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · 1] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK [2] Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN, UK. · Norlux Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, CRP-Santé Luxembourg, 84 Val Fleuri, L-1526, Luxembourg. · Norlux Neuro-Oncology, Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen, Jonas Lies vei 91, N-5019 Bergen, Norway. · Departments of Surgery and Pathology, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · Departments of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Texas 77030, USA. · The David M. Rubenstein Pancreatic Cancer Research Center and Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · 1] ARC-NET Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy [2] Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · ARC-NET Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · 1] Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy [2] Departments of Surgery and Pathology, Ospedale Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Negrar, Verona 37024, Italy. · 1] Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy [2] Departments of Surgery and Pathology, Ospedale Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Negrar, Verona 37024, Italy. · Department of Oncology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94122, USA. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. ·Nature · Pubmed #25719666.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal of malignancies and a major health burden. We performed whole-genome sequencing and copy number variation (CNV) analysis of 100 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). Chromosomal rearrangements leading to gene disruption were prevalent, affecting genes known to be important in pancreatic cancer (TP53, SMAD4, CDKN2A, ARID1A and ROBO2) and new candidate drivers of pancreatic carcinogenesis (KDM6A and PREX2). Patterns of structural variation (variation in chromosomal structure) classified PDACs into 4 subtypes with potential clinical utility: the subtypes were termed stable, locally rearranged, scattered and unstable. A significant proportion harboured focal amplifications, many of which contained druggable oncogenes (ERBB2, MET, FGFR1, CDK6, PIK3R3 and PIK3CA), but at low individual patient prevalence. Genomic instability co-segregated with inactivation of DNA maintenance genes (BRCA1, BRCA2 or PALB2) and a mutational signature of DNA damage repair deficiency. Of 8 patients who received platinum therapy, 4 of 5 individuals with these measures of defective DNA maintenance responded.

2 Article Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma reveal epigenetic deregulation of SLIT-ROBO, ITGA2 and MET signaling. 2014

Nones, Katia / Waddell, Nic / Song, Sarah / Patch, Ann-Marie / Miller, David / Johns, Amber / Wu, Jianmin / Kassahn, Karin S / Wood, David / Bailey, Peter / Fink, Lynn / Manning, Suzanne / Christ, Angelika N / Nourse, Craig / Kazakoff, Stephen / Taylor, Darrin / Leonard, Conrad / Chang, David K / Jones, Marc D / Thomas, Michelle / Watson, Clare / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark / Rooman, Ilse / Pajic, Marina / Anonymous840784 / Butturini, Giovanni / Malpaga, Anna / Corbo, Vincenzo / Crippa, Stefano / Falconi, Massimo / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Castelli, Paola / Lawlor, Rita T / Gill, Anthony J / Scarpa, Aldo / Pearson, John V / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M. ·Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #24500968.

ABSTRACT: The importance of epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation in tumorigenesis is increasingly being appreciated. To define the genome-wide pattern of DNA methylation in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC), we captured the methylation profiles of 167 untreated resected PDACs and compared them to a panel of 29 adjacent nontransformed pancreata using high-density arrays. A total of 11,634 CpG sites associated with 3,522 genes were significantly differentially methylated (DM) in PDAC and were capable of segregating PDAC from non-malignant pancreas, regardless of tumor cellularity. As expected, PDAC hypermethylation was most prevalent in the 5' region of genes (including the proximal promoter, 5'UTR and CpG islands). Approximately 33% DM genes showed significant inverse correlation with mRNA expression levels. Pathway analysis revealed an enrichment of aberrantly methylated genes involved in key molecular mechanisms important to PDAC: TGF-β, WNT, integrin signaling, cell adhesion, stellate cell activation and axon guidance. Given the recent discovery that SLIT-ROBO mutations play a clinically important role in PDAC, the role of epigenetic perturbation of axon guidance was pursued in more detail. Bisulfite amplicon deep sequencing and qRT-PCR expression analyses confirmed recurrent perturbation of axon guidance pathway genes SLIT2, SLIT3, ROBO1, ROBO3, ITGA2 and MET and suggests epigenetic suppression of SLIT-ROBO signaling and up-regulation of MET and ITGA2 expression. Hypomethylation of MET and ITGA2 correlated with high gene expression, which was associated with poor survival. These data suggest that aberrant methylation plays an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis affecting core signaling pathways with potential implications for the disease pathophysiology and therapy.

3 Article Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes. 2012

Biankin, Andrew V / Waddell, Nicola / Kassahn, Karin S / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B / Johns, Amber L / Miller, David K / Wilson, Peter J / Patch, Ann-Marie / Wu, Jianmin / Chang, David K / Cowley, Mark J / Gardiner, Brooke B / Song, Sarah / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Manning, Suzanne / Wani, Shivangi / Gongora, Milena / Pajic, Marina / Scarlett, Christopher J / Gill, Anthony J / Pinho, Andreia V / Rooman, Ilse / Anderson, Matthew / Holmes, Oliver / Leonard, Conrad / Taylor, Darrin / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Nones, Katia / Fink, J Lynn / Christ, Angelika / Bruxner, Tim / Cloonan, Nicole / Kolle, Gabriel / Newell, Felicity / Pinese, Mark / Mead, R Scott / Humphris, Jeremy L / Kaplan, Warren / Jones, Marc D / Colvin, Emily K / Nagrial, Adnan M / Humphrey, Emily S / Chou, Angela / Chin, Venessa T / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Lovell, Jessica A / Daly, Roger J / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Anonymous1421514 / Kakkar, Nipun / Zhao, Fengmei / Wu, Yuan Qing / Wang, Min / Muzny, Donna M / Fisher, William E / Brunicardi, F Charles / Hodges, Sally E / Reid, Jeffrey G / Drummond, Jennifer / Chang, Kyle / Han, Yi / Lewis, Lora R / Dinh, Huyen / Buhay, Christian J / Beck, Timothy / Timms, Lee / Sam, Michelle / Begley, Kimberly / Brown, Andrew / Pai, Deepa / Panchal, Ami / Buchner, Nicholas / De Borja, Richard / Denroche, Robert E / Yung, Christina K / Serra, Stefano / Onetto, Nicole / Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata / Tsao, Ming-Sound / Shaw, Patricia A / Petersen, Gloria M / Gallinger, Steven / Hruban, Ralph H / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Schulick, Richard D / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Capelli, Paola / Corbo, Vincenzo / Scardoni, Maria / Tortora, Giampaolo / Tempero, Margaret A / Mann, Karen M / Jenkins, Nancy A / Perez-Mancera, Pedro A / Adams, David J / Largaespada, David A / Wessels, Lodewyk F A / Rust, Alistair G / Stein, Lincoln D / Tuveson, David A / Copeland, Neal G / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Scarpa, Aldo / Eshleman, James R / Hudson, Thomas J / Sutherland, Robert L / Wheeler, David A / Pearson, John V / McPherson, John D / Gibbs, Richard A / Grimmond, Sean M. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. ·Nature · Pubmed #23103869.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

4 Article qpure: A tool to estimate tumor cellularity from genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism profiles. 2012

Song, Sarah / Nones, Katia / Miller, David / Harliwong, Ivon / Kassahn, Karin S / Pinese, Mark / Pajic, Marina / Gill, Anthony J / Johns, Amber L / Anderson, Matthew / Holmes, Oliver / Leonard, Conrad / Taylor, Darrin / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Newell, Felicity / Cowley, Mark J / Wu, Jianmin / Wilson, Peter / Fink, Lynn / Biankin, Andrew V / Waddell, Nic / Grimmond, Sean M / Pearson, John V. ·Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. s.song@imb.uq.edu.au ·PLoS One · Pubmed #23049875.

ABSTRACT: Tumour cellularity, the relative proportion of tumour and normal cells in a sample, affects the sensitivity of mutation detection, copy number analysis, cancer gene expression and methylation profiling. Tumour cellularity is traditionally estimated by pathological review of sectioned specimens; however this method is both subjective and prone to error due to heterogeneity within lesions and cellularity differences between the sample viewed during pathological review and tissue used for research purposes. In this paper we describe a statistical model to estimate tumour cellularity from SNP array profiles of paired tumour and normal samples using shifts in SNP allele frequency at regions of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the tumour. We also provide qpure, a software implementation of the method. Our experiments showed that there is a medium correlation 0.42 ([Formula: see text]-value=0.0001) between tumor cellularity estimated by qpure and pathology review. Interestingly there is a high correlation 0.87 ([Formula: see text]-value [Formula: see text] 2.2e-16) between cellularity estimates by qpure and deep Ion Torrent sequencing of known somatic KRAS mutations; and a weaker correlation 0.32 ([Formula: see text]-value=0.004) between IonTorrent sequencing and pathology review. This suggests that qpure may be a more accurate predictor of tumour cellularity than pathology review. qpure can be downloaded from https://sourceforge.net/projects/qpure/.