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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Katrin M. Sjoquist
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Katrin Sjoquist wrote the following 5 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Chemotherapy and radiotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. 2018

Chin, Venessa / Nagrial, Adnan / Sjoquist, Katrin / O'Connor, Chelsie A / Chantrill, Lorraine / Biankin, Andrew V / Scholten, Rob Jpm / Yip, Desmond. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 2010. ·Cochrane Database Syst Rev · Pubmed #29557103.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease with few effective treatment options. Over the past few decades, many anti-cancer therapies have been tested in the locally advanced and metastatic setting, with mixed results. This review attempts to synthesise all the randomised data available to help better inform patient and clinician decision-making when dealing with this difficult disease. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or both for first-line treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Our primary outcome was overall survival, while secondary outcomes include progression-free survival, grade 3/4 adverse events, therapy response and quality of life. SEARCH METHODS: We searched for published and unpublished studies in CENTRAL (searched 14 June 2017), Embase (1980 to 14 June 2017), MEDLINE (1946 to 14 June 2017) and CANCERLIT (1999 to 2002) databases. We also handsearched all relevant conference abstracts published up until 14 June 2017. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised studies assessing overall survival outcomes in patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy, alone or in combination, were the eligible treatments. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently analysed studies, and a third settled any disputes. We extracted data on overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), response rates, adverse events (AEs) and quality of life (QoL), and we assessed risk of bias for each study. MAIN RESULTS: We included 42 studies addressing chemotherapy in 9463 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. We did not identify any eligible studies on radiotherapy.We did not find any benefit for chemotherapy over best supportive care. However, two identified studies did not have sufficient data to be included in the analysis, and many of the chemotherapy regimens studied were outdated.Compared to gemcitabine alone, participants receiving 5FU had worse OS (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.26 to 2.27, moderate-quality evidence), PFS (HR 1.47, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.92) and QoL. On the other hand, two studies showed FOLFIRINOX was better than gemcitabine for OS (HR 0.51 95% CI 0.43 to 0.60, moderate-quality evidence), PFS (HR 0.46, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.57) and response rates (RR 3.38, 95% CI 2.01 to 5.65), but it increased the rate of side effects. The studies evaluating CO-101, ZD9331 and exatecan did not show benefit or harm when compared with gemcitabine alone.Giving gemcitabine at a fixed dose rate improved OS (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.94, high-quality evidence) but increased the rate of side effects when compared with bolus dosing.When comparing gemcitabine combinations to gemcitabine alone, gemcitabine plus platinum improved PFS (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.95) and response rates (RR 1.48, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.98) but not OS (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.08, low-quality evidence). The rate of side effects increased. Gemcitabine plus fluoropyrimidine improved OS (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.81 to 0.95), PFS (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.72 to 0.87) and response rates (RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.47, high-quality evidence), but it also increased side effects. Gemcitabine plus topoisomerase inhibitor did not improve survival outcomes but did increase toxicity. One study demonstrated that gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel improved OS (HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.84, high-quality evidence), PFS (HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.82) and response rates (RR 3.29, 95% CI 2.24 to 4.84) but increased side effects. Gemcitabine-containing multi-drug combinations (GEMOXEL or cisplatin/epirubicin/5FU/gemcitabine) improved OS (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.79, low-quality evidence), PFS (HR 0.43, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.62) and QOL.We did not find any survival advantages when comparing 5FU combinations to 5FU alone. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Combination chemotherapy has recently overtaken the long-standing gemcitabine as the standard of care. FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel are highly efficacious, but our analysis shows that other combination regimens also offer a benefit. Selection of the most appropriate chemotherapy for individual patients still remains difficult, with clinicopathological stratification remaining elusive. Biomarker development is essential to help rationalise treatment selection for patients.

2 Review Advances in Molecular Pathology and Treatment of Periampullary Cancers. 2016

Chandrasegaram, Manju D / Chen, John W / Price, Timothy J / Zalcberg, John / Sjoquist, Katrin / Merrett, Neil D. ·From the *NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre; †Department of Surgery, The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane; ‡Department of Surgery, Flinders Medical Centre; §Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide; ∥University of Adelaide, South Australia; ¶School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne; #Cancer Care Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, St George Hospital; **Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital; and ††Division of Surgery, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #26348463.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Periampullary cancers (PACs) include the following 4 traditional anatomic subtypes: pancreatic, ampullary, biliary, or duodenal cancers. This review was performed to highlight recent advances in the genomic and molecular understanding of each PAC subtype and the advances in chemotherapeutic and molecular trials in these cancer subtypes. RESULTS: Recent advances have highlighted differences in the genomic and molecular features within each PAC subtype. Ampullary cancers can now be further defined accurately into their intestinal and pancreatobiliary subtypes using histomolecular profiling. K-ras mutation, which occurs in most pancreatic cancers, is found to occur less frequently in ampullary (42%-52%), biliary (22%-23%), and duodenal cancers (32%-35%), suggesting crucial differences in targetable mutations in these cancer subtypes.Ampullary cancers of intestinal subtype and duodenal cancers seem to share similarities with colorectal cancer, given that they respond to similar chemotherapeutic regimens. This has potential implications for clinical trials and treatment selection, where PACs are often considered together. CONCLUSIONS: Future trials should be designed in view of our increased understanding of the different anatomic and histomolecularly profiled subtypes of PAC cancers, which respects their individual molecular characteristics, phenotype, and response to treatment.

3 Review Second-line treatment in inoperable pancreatic adenocarcinoma: A systematic review and synthesis of all clinical trials. 2015

Nagrial, Adnan M / Chin, Venessa T / Sjoquist, Katrin M / Pajic, Marina / Horvath, Lisa G / Biankin, Andrew V / Yip, Desmond. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; The Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. Electronic address: a.nagrial@garvan.org.au. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; The Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. · NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia; Cancer Care Centre, St. George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; The Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; St. Vincents's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; The Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; Department of Medical Oncology, Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; The Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, NSW 2200, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Liverpool, NSW 2170, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G61 1BD, Scotland, UK; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, Scotland G4 0SF, UK. · Department of Medical Oncology, The Canberra Hospital, Garran, ACT, Australia; ANU Medical School, Australian National University, Acton, ACT, Australia. ·Crit Rev Oncol Hematol · Pubmed #26481952.

ABSTRACT: There remains uncertainty regarding the optimal second-line chemotherapy in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The current recommendation of 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin may not be relevant in current practice, as FOLFIRINOX (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan and oxaliplatin) has become a more popular first line therapy in fit patients. The majority of studies in this setting are single-arm Phase II trials with significant heterogeneity of patient populations, treatments and outcomes. In this review, we sought to systematically review and synthesise all prospective data available for the second-line treatment of advanced PDAC.

4 Review Personalising pancreas cancer treatment: When tissue is the issue. 2014

Sjoquist, Katrin M / Chin, Venessa T / Chantrill, Lorraine A / O'Connor, Chelsie / Hemmings, Chris / Chang, David K / Chou, Angela / Pajic, Marina / Johns, Amber L / Nagrial, Adnan M / Biankin, Andrew V / Yip, Desmond. ·Katrin M Sjoquist, NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 1450, Australia. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #24976722.

ABSTRACT: The treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer has not moved much beyond single agent gemcitabine until recently when protocols such as FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan and oxaliplatin) and nab-paclitaxel-gemcitabine have demonstrated some improved outcomes. Advances in technology especially in massively parallel genome sequencing has progressed our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer especially the candidate signalling pathways that are involved in tumourogenesis and disease course. This has allowed identification of potentially actionable mutations that may be targeted by new biological agents. The heterogeneity of pancreatic cancer makes tumour tissue collection important with the aim of being able to personalise therapies for the individual as opposed to a one size fits all approach to treatment of the condition. This paper reviews the developments in this area of translational research and the ongoing clinical studies that will attempt to move this into the everyday oncology practice.

5 Clinical Trial Precision Medicine for Advanced Pancreas Cancer: The Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy (IMPaCT) Trial. 2015

Chantrill, Lorraine A / Nagrial, Adnan M / Watson, Clare / Johns, Amber L / Martyn-Smith, Mona / Simpson, Skye / Mead, Scott / Jones, Marc D / Samra, Jaswinder S / Gill, Anthony J / Watson, Nicole / Chin, Venessa T / Humphris, Jeremy L / Chou, Angela / Brown, Belinda / Morey, Adrienne / Pajic, Marina / Grimmond, Sean M / Chang, David K / Thomas, David / Sebastian, Lucille / Sjoquist, Katrin / Yip, Sonia / Pavlakis, Nick / Asghari, Ray / Harvey, Sandra / Grimison, Peter / Simes, John / Biankin, Andrew V / Anonymous5550827 / Anonymous5560827. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia. Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk l.chantrill@garvan.org.au. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland. · University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Macquarie University Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland. Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia. West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · Bankstown Cancer Centre, Bankstown, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland. Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia. West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk l.chantrill@garvan.org.au. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #25896973.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Personalized medicine strategies using genomic profiling are particularly pertinent for pancreas cancer. The Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy (IMPaCT) trial was initially designed to exploit results from genome sequencing of pancreatic cancer under the auspices of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) in Australia. Sequencing revealed small subsets of patients with aberrations in their tumor genome that could be targeted with currently available therapies. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The pilot stage of the IMPaCT trial assessed the feasibility of acquiring suitable tumor specimens for molecular analysis and returning high-quality actionable genomic data within a clinically acceptable timeframe. We screened for three molecular targets: HER2 amplification; KRAS wild-type; and mutations in DNA damage repair pathways (BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM). RESULTS: Tumor biopsy and archived tumor samples were collected from 93 patients and 76 were screened. To date 22 candidate cases have been identified: 14 KRAS wild-type, 5 cases of HER2 amplification, 2 mutations in BRCA2, and 1 ATM mutation. Median time from consent to the return of validated results was 21.5 days. An inability to obtain a biopsy or insufficient tumor content in the available specimen were common reasons for patient exclusion from molecular analysis while deteriorating performance status prohibited a number of patients from proceeding in the study. CONCLUSIONS: Documenting the feasibility of acquiring and screening biospecimens for actionable molecular targets in real time will aid other groups embarking on similar trials. Key elements include the need to better prescreen patients, screen more patients, and offer more attractive clinical trial options.