Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by John Simes
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, J. Simes wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Meta-analysis of radical resection rates and margin assessment in pancreatic cancer. 2015

Chandrasegaram, M D / Goldstein, D / Simes, J / Gebski, V / Kench, J G / Gill, A J / Samra, J S / Merrett, N D / Richardson, A J / Barbour, A P. ·National Health and Medical Research Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Discipline of Surgery, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Prince Charles Hospital, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Prince of Wales Clinical School University of New South Wales, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology Research Group, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia. · University of Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·Br J Surg · Pubmed #26350029.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: R0 resection rates (complete tumour removal with negative resection margins) in pancreatic cancer are 70-80 per cent when a 0-mm margin is used, declining to 15-24 per cent with a 1-mm margin. This review evaluated the R0 resection rates according to different margin definitions and techniques. METHODS: Three databases (MEDLINE from 1946, PubMed from 1946 and Embase from 1949) were searched to mid-October 2014. The search terms included 'pancreatectomy OR pancreaticoduodenectomy' and 'margin'. A meta-analysis was performed with studies in three groups: group 1, axial slicing technique (minimum 1-mm margin); group 2, other slicing techniques (minimum 1-mm margin); and group 3, studies with minimum 0-mm margin. RESULTS: The R0 rates were 29 (95 per cent c.i. 26 to 32) per cent in group 1 (8 studies; 882 patients) and 49 (47 to 52) per cent in group 2 (6 studies; 1568 patients). The combined R0 rate (groups 1 and 2) was 41 (40 to 43) per cent. The R0 rate in group 3 (7 studies; 1926 patients) with a 0-mm margin was 72 (70 to 74) per cent The survival hazard ratios (R1 resection/R0 resection) revealed a reduction in the risk of death of at least 22 per cent in group 1, 12 per cent in group 2 and 23 per cent in group 3 with an R0 compared with an R1 resection. Local recurrence occurred more frequently with an R1 resection in most studies. CONCLUSION: Margin clearance definitions affect R0 resection rates in pancreatic cancer surgery. This review collates individual studies providing an estimate of achievable R0 rates, creating a benchmark for future trials.

2 Clinical Trial Precision Medicine for Advanced Pancreas Cancer: The Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy (IMPaCT) Trial. 2015

Chantrill, Lorraine A / Nagrial, Adnan M / Watson, Clare / Johns, Amber L / Martyn-Smith, Mona / Simpson, Skye / Mead, Scott / Jones, Marc D / Samra, Jaswinder S / Gill, Anthony J / Watson, Nicole / Chin, Venessa T / Humphris, Jeremy L / Chou, Angela / Brown, Belinda / Morey, Adrienne / Pajic, Marina / Grimmond, Sean M / Chang, David K / Thomas, David / Sebastian, Lucille / Sjoquist, Katrin / Yip, Sonia / Pavlakis, Nick / Asghari, Ray / Harvey, Sandra / Grimison, Peter / Simes, John / Biankin, Andrew V / Anonymous5550827 / Anonymous5560827. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia. Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk l.chantrill@garvan.org.au. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland. · University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Macquarie University Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland. Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia. West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · Bankstown Cancer Centre, Bankstown, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland. Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia. West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk l.chantrill@garvan.org.au. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #25896973.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Personalized medicine strategies using genomic profiling are particularly pertinent for pancreas cancer. The Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy (IMPaCT) trial was initially designed to exploit results from genome sequencing of pancreatic cancer under the auspices of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) in Australia. Sequencing revealed small subsets of patients with aberrations in their tumor genome that could be targeted with currently available therapies. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The pilot stage of the IMPaCT trial assessed the feasibility of acquiring suitable tumor specimens for molecular analysis and returning high-quality actionable genomic data within a clinically acceptable timeframe. We screened for three molecular targets: HER2 amplification; KRAS wild-type; and mutations in DNA damage repair pathways (BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM). RESULTS: Tumor biopsy and archived tumor samples were collected from 93 patients and 76 were screened. To date 22 candidate cases have been identified: 14 KRAS wild-type, 5 cases of HER2 amplification, 2 mutations in BRCA2, and 1 ATM mutation. Median time from consent to the return of validated results was 21.5 days. An inability to obtain a biopsy or insufficient tumor content in the available specimen were common reasons for patient exclusion from molecular analysis while deteriorating performance status prohibited a number of patients from proceeding in the study. CONCLUSIONS: Documenting the feasibility of acquiring and screening biospecimens for actionable molecular targets in real time will aid other groups embarking on similar trials. Key elements include the need to better prescreen patients, screen more patients, and offer more attractive clinical trial options.