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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Sabina Sieri
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Sabina Sieri wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Plasma antibodies to oral bacteria and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large European prospective cohort study. 2013

Michaud, Dominique S / Izard, Jacques / Wilhelm-Benartzi, Charlotte S / You, Doo-Ho / Grote, Verena A / Tjønneland, Anne / Dahm, Christina C / Overvad, Kim / Jenab, Mazda / Fedirko, Veronika / Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Racine, Antoine / Kaaks, Rudolf / Boeing, Heiner / Foerster, Jana / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Lagiou, Pagona / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Sieri, Sabina / Palli, Domenico / Tumino, Rosario / Panico, Salvatore / Siersema, Peter D / Peeters, Petra H M / Lund, Eiliv / Barricarte, Aurelio / Huerta, José-María / Molina-Montes, Esther / Dorronsoro, Miren / Quirós, J Ramón / Duell, Eric J / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Lindkvist, Björn / Johansen, Dorthe / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Travis, Ruth C / Vineis, Paolo / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Riboli, Elio. ·Department of Epidemiology, Division of Biology and Medicine, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #22990306.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Examine the relationship between antibodies to 25 oral bacteria and pancreatic cancer risk in a prospective cohort study. DESIGN: We measured antibodies to oral bacteria in prediagnosis blood samples from 405 pancreatic cancer cases and 416 matched controls, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Analyses were conducted using conditional logistic regression and additionally adjusted for smoking status and body mass index. RESULTS: Individuals with high levels of antibodies against Porphyromonas gingivalis ATTC 53978, a pathogenic periodontal bacteria, had a twofold higher risk of pancreatic cancer than individuals with lower levels of these antibodies (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.05 to 4.36; >200 ng/ml vs ≤200 ng/ml). To explore the association with commensal (non-pathogenic) oral bacteria, we performed a cluster analysis and identified two groups of individuals, based on their antibody profiles. A cluster with overall higher levels of antibodies had a 45% lower risk of pancreatic cancer than a cluster with overall lower levels of antibodies (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.36 to 0.83). CONCLUSIONS: Periodontal disease might increase the risk for pancreatic cancer. Moreover, increased levels of antibodies against specific commensal oral bacteria, which can inhibit growth of pathogenic bacteria, might reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Studies are needed to determine whether oral bacteria have direct effects on pancreatic cancer pathogenesis or serve as markers of the immune response.

2 Article The associations of advanced glycation end products and its soluble receptor with pancreatic cancer risk: a case-control study within the prospective EPIC Cohort. 2012

Grote, Verena A / Nieters, Alexandra / Kaaks, Rudolf / Tjønneland, Anne / Roswall, Nina / Overvad, Kim / Nielsen, Michael R Skjelbo / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine / Racine, Antoine / Teucher, Birgit / Lukanova, Annekatrin / Boeing, Heiner / Drogan, Dagmar / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Lagiou, Pagona / Palli, Domenico / Sieri, Sabina / Tumino, Rosario / Vineis, Paolo / Mattiello, Amalia / Argüelles Suárez, Marcial Vicente / Duell, Eric J / Sánchez, María-José / Dorronsoro, Miren / Huerta Castaño, José María / Barricarte, Aurelio / Jeurnink, Suzanne M / Peeters, Petra H M / Sund, Malin / Ye, Weimin / Regner, Sara / Lindkvist, Björn / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Allen, Naomi E / Crowe, Francesca L / Fedirko, Veronika / Jenab, Mazda / Romaguera, Dora / Siddiq, Afshan / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Rohrmann, Sabine. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology c020, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #22301828.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptors (RAGE) have been implicated in cancer development through their proinflammatory capabilities. However, prospective data on their association with cancer of specific sites, including pancreatic cancer, are limited. METHODS: Prediagnostic blood levels of the AGE product Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and the endogenous secreted receptor for AGE (esRAGE) were measured using ELISA in 454 patients with exocrine pancreatic cancer and individually matched controls within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Pancreatic cancer risk was estimated by calculating ORs with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Elevated CML levels tended to be associated with a reduction in pancreatic cancer risk [OR = 0.57 (95% CI, 0.32-1.01) comparing highest with lowest quintile), whereas no association was observed for esRAGE (OR = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.62-1.54). Adjustments for body mass index and smoking attenuated the inverse associations of CML with pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.41-1.49). There was an inverse association between esRAGE and risk of pancreatic cancer for cases that were diagnosed within the first 2 years of follow-up [OR = 0.46 (95% CI, 0.22-0.96) for a doubling in concentration], whereas there was no association among those with a longer follow-up (OR = 1.11; 95% CI, 0.88-1.39; P(interaction) = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPACT: Our results do not provide evidence for an association of higher CML or lower esRAGE levels with risk of pancreatic cancer. The role of AGE/RAGE in pancreatic cancer would benefit from further investigations.

3 Article The association of circulating adiponectin levels with pancreatic cancer risk: a study within the prospective EPIC cohort. 2012

Grote, Verena A / Rohrmann, Sabine / Dossus, Laure / Nieters, Alexandra / Halkjaer, Jytte / Tjønneland, Anne / Overvad, Kim / Stegger, Jakob / Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Teucher, Birgit / Becker, Susen / Montonen, Jukka / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Lagiou, Pagona / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Palli, Domenico / Sieri, Sabina / Tumino, Rosario / Vineis, Paolo / Mattiello, Amalia / Argüelles, Marcial / Duell, Eric J / Molina-Montes, Esther / Larrañaga, Nerea / Chirlaque, María-Dolores / Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte / Jeurnink, Suzanne M / Peeters, Petra Hm / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Lindkvist, Björn / Johansen, Dorthe / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Crowe, Francesca L / Romieu, Isabelle / Rinaldi, Sabina / Jenab, Mazda / Romaguera, Dora / Michaud, Dominique S / Riboli, Elio / Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H / Kaaks, Rudolf. ·German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #21681743.

ABSTRACT: Excess body weight and type 2 diabetes mellitus, risk factors of pancreatic cancer, are characterized by decreased levels of adiponectin. In addition to anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative actions, adiponectin has an important role in regulating glucose metabolism, i.e., decreasing circulating blood glucose levels. Prospectively, hyperglycemia has been associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of pre-diagnostic adiponectin levels with pancreatic cancer risk. We conducted a case-control study nested within European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Blood samples of 452 pancreatic cancer cases and 452 individually matched controls were analyzed by immunoassays. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Overall, adiponectin showed no association with pancreas cancer risk; however, among never smokers, higher circulating levels of adiponectin were associated with a reduction in pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 0.44 [95% CI 0.23-0.82] for highest vs. lowest quartile), whereas among current smokers there was no significant association (OR = 1.59 [95% CI 0.67-3.76] for highest vs. lowest quartile; p-trend = 0.530; p-interaction = 0.309). In our study, lower adiponectin concentrations may be associated with the development of pancreatic cancer among never smokers, whereas the only other prospective study being conducted so far showed a decrease in risk among male smokers. Therefore, further studies are needed to clarify the role of adiponectin in pancreatic cancer development.

4 Article A U-shaped relationship between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2011

Chuang, Shu-Chun / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Ueland, Per Magne / Vollset, Stein Emil / Midttun, Øivind / Olsen, Anja / Tjønneland, Anne / Overvad, Kim / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Morois, Sophie / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Teucher, Birgit / Kaaks, Rudolf / Weikert, Cornelia / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Benetou, Vassiliki / Naska, Androniki / Jenab, Mazda / Slimani, Nadia / Romieu, Isabelle / Michaud, Dominique S / Palli, Domenico / Sieri, Sabina / Panico, Salvatore / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Tumino, Rosario / Skeie, Guri / Duell, Eric J / Rodriguez, Laudina / Molina-Montes, Esther / Huerta, José Marı A / Larrañaga, Nerea / Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte / Johansen, Dorthe / Manjer, Jonas / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Peeters, Petra H M / Jeurnink, Suzanne / Wareham, Nicholas / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Crowe, Francesca / Riboli, Elio / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Vineis, Paolo. ·School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #21411310.

ABSTRACT: Folate intake has shown an inverse association with pancreatic cancer; nevertheless, results from plasma measurements were inconsistent. The aim of this study is to examine the association between plasma total homocysteine, methionine, folate, cobalamin, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We conducted a nested case-control study in the EPIC cohort, which has an average of 9.6 years of follow-up (1992-2006), using 463 incident pancreatic cancer cases. Controls were matched to each case by center, sex, age (± 1 year), date (± 1 year) and time (± 3 h) at blood collection and fasting status. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for education, smoking status, plasma cotinine concentration, alcohol drinking, body mass index and diabetes status. We observed a U-shaped association between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk. The ORs for plasma folate ≤ 5, 5-10, 10-15 (reference), 15-20, and > 20 nmol/L were 1.58 (95% CI=0.72-3.46), 1.39 (0.93-2.08), 1.0 (reference), 0.79 (0.52-1.21), and 1.34 (0.89-2.02), respectively. Methionine was associated with an increased risk in men (per quintile increment: OR=1.17, 95% CI=1.00-1.38) but not in women (OR=0.91, 95% CI=0.78-1.07; p for heterogeneity <0.01). Our results suggest a U-shaped association between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk in both men and women. The positive association that we observed between methionine and pancreatic cancer may be sex dependent and may differ by time of follow-up. However, the mechanisms behind the observed associations warrant further investigation.