Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Xiao-Ou Shu
Based on 30 articles published since 2009
(Why 30 articles?)
||||

Between 2009 and 2019, Xiao Ou Shu wrote the following 30 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Article Pancreatic cancer risk is modulated by inflammatory potential of diet and ABO genotype: a consortia-based evaluation and replication study. 2018

Antwi, Samuel O / Bamlet, William R / Pedersen, Katrina S / Chaffee, Kari G / Risch, Harvey A / Shivappa, Nitin / Steck, Susan E / Anderson, Kristin E / Bracci, Paige M / Polesel, Jerry / Serraino, Diego / La Vecchia, Carlo / Bosetti, Cristina / Li, Donghui / Oberg, Ann L / Arslan, Alan A / Albanes, Demetrius / Duell, Eric J / Huybrechts, Inge / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Hoover, Robert / Mannisto, Satu / Chanock, Stephen J / Zheng, Wei / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Stepien, Magdalena / Canzian, Federico / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Quirós, José Ramon / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Bruinsma, Fiona / Milne, Roger L / Giles, Graham G / Hébert, James R / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Petersen, Gloria M. ·Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Division of Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA. · Cancer Prevention and Control Program, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (PN), Italy. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, IRCCS-Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute-IDIBELL, Catalan Institute of Oncology-ICO. L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, France. · Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare Helsinki, Finland. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, UK. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Pantai Valley, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, and Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Global and Population Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #29800239.

ABSTRACT: Diets with high inflammatory potential are suspected to increase risk for pancreatic cancer (PC). Using pooled analyses, we examined whether this association applies to populations from different geographic regions and population subgroups with varying risks for PC, including variation in ABO blood type. Data from six case-control studies (cases, n = 2414; controls, n = 4528) in the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) were analyzed, followed by replication in five nested case-control studies (cases, n = 1268; controls, n = 4215) from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan). Two polymorphisms in the ABO locus (rs505922 and rs8176746) were used to infer participants' blood types. Dietary questionnaire-derived nutrient/food intake was used to compute energy-adjusted dietary inflammatory index (E-DII®) scores to assess inflammatory potential of diet. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. Higher E-DII scores, reflecting greater inflammatory potential of diet, were associated with increased PC risk in PanC4 [ORQ5 versus Q1=2.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.85-2.61, Ptrend < 0.0001; ORcontinuous = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.17-1.24], and PanScan (ORQ5 versus Q1 = 1.23, 95% CI = 0.92-1.66, Ptrend = 0.008; ORcontinuous = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.02-1.15). As expected, genotype-derived non-O blood type was associated with increased PC risk in both the PanC4 and PanScan studies. Stratified analyses of associations between E-DII quintiles and PC by genotype-derived ABO blood type did not show interaction by blood type (Pinteraction = 0.10 in PanC4 and Pinteraction=0.13 in PanScan). The results show that consuming a pro-inflammatory diet and carrying non-O blood type are each individually, but not interactively, associated with increased PC risk.

2 Article Prospective metabolomics study identifies potential novel blood metabolites associated with pancreatic cancer risk. 2018

Shu, Xiang / Zheng, Wei / Yu, Danxia / Li, Hong-Lan / Lan, Qing / Yang, Gong / Cai, Hui / Ma, Xiao / Rothman, Nathaniel / Gao, Yu-Tang / Jia, Wei / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Shu, Xiao-Ou. ·Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN. · State Key Laboratory of Oncogene and Related Genes & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI. · Center for Translational Medicine, and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Diabetes Mellitus, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai, 200233, China. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #29717485.

ABSTRACT: Using a metabolomics approach, we systematically searched for circulating metabolite biomarkers for pancreatic cancer risk in a case-control study nested within two prospective Shanghai cohorts. Included in our study were 226 incident pancreatic cancer cases and their individually-matched controls. Untargeted mass spectrometry platforms were used to measure metabolites in blood samples collected prior to cancer diagnosis. Conditional logistic regression was performed to assess the associations of metabolites with pancreatic cancer risk. We identified 10 metabolites associated with pancreatic cancer, after accounting for multiple comparisons (the Benjamini-Hochberg false discovery rate <0.05). The majority of the identified metabolites were glycerophospholipids (ORs per SD increase: 0.44-2.32; p values: 7.2 × 10

3 Article Physical Activity and Pancreatic Cancer Risk among Urban Chinese: Results from Two Prospective Cohort Studies. 2018

Wu, Lang / Zheng, Wei / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Gao, Yu-Tang / Li, Hong-Lan / Cai, Hui / Shu, Xiao-Ou. ·Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · State Key Laboratory of Oncogene and Related Genes & Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. xiao-ou.shu@vanderbilt.edu. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #29475964.

ABSTRACT:

4 Article Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2018

Klein, Alison P / Wolpin, Brian M / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Mocci, Evelina / Zhang, Mingfeng / Canzian, Federico / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason W / Jermusyk, Ashley / Zhong, Jun / Chen, Fei / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Arslan, Alan A / Babic, Ana / Bamlet, William R / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Berndt, Sonja I / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Borgida, Ayelet / Bracci, Paige M / Brais, Lauren / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Buring, Julie / Campa, Daniele / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Chaffee, Kari G / Chung, Charles C / Cleary, Sean / Cotterchio, Michelle / Dijk, Frederike / Duell, Eric J / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gallinger, Steven / M Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giles, Graham G / Giovannucci, Edward / Goggins, Michael / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Hackert, Thilo / Haiman, Christopher / Hartge, Patricia / Hasan, Manal / Hegyi, Peter / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Herman, Joseph / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert / Hung, Rayjean J / Jacobs, Eric J / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Janout, Vladimir / Kaaks, Rudolf / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Kooperberg, Charles / Kulke, Matthew H / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert J / Laheru, Daniel / Landi, Stefano / Lawlor, Rita T / Lee, I-Min / LeMarchand, Loic / Lu, Lingeng / Malats, Núria / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice / Neale, Rachel E / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Olson, Sara H / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Patel, Alpa V / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scelo, Ghislaine / Sesso, Howard D / Severi, Gianluca / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra / Smith, Jill P / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Tavano, Francesca / Thornquist, Mark D / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vashist, Yogesh / Visvanathan, Kala / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Zhaoming / Wentzensen, Nicolas / White, Emily / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Kraft, Peter / Li, Donghui / Chanock, Stephen / Obazee, Ofure / Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1×5, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 94158, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), 69372, Lyon, France. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), 3720 BA, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, 3584 CX, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, 00185, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, 21702, USA. · Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2L7, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 3M7, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, 08908, Spain. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, 65653, Brno, Czech Republic. · Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, 06510, USA. · Department of Translational Research and The New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Boston VA Healthcare System, Boston, MA, 02132, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 106 79, Athens, Greece. · Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · SWOG Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90032, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77230, USA. · First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, 6725, Szeged, Hungary. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Institute of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Charles University, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, 150 06, Prague 5, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, 30303, USA. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, 02-776, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, 701 03, Ostrava, Czech Republic. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Olomouc, 771 47, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 0SP, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA. · ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, 96813, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), 28029, Madrid, Spain. · CIBERONC, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Carrara, 54033, Italy. · Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare, 00271, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital, 775 20, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Population Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, 4029, Australia. · Department of General Surgery, University of Heidelburg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padua, 35124, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, 40138, Bologna, Italy. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre-CNIO, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Centre de Recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP, Inserm U1018), Facultés de Medicine, Université Paris-Saclay, UPS, UVSQ, Gustave Roussy, 94800, Villejuif, France. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA. · Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, 20057, USA. · Laboratory for Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, 323 00, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, 901 85, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, 90-647, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", 71013, San Giovanni Rotondo, FG, Italy. · Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, 94612, USA. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 142 20, Prague 4, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 14214, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, 38105, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Nat Commun · Pubmed #29422604.

ABSTRACT: In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). Here, we find significant evidence of a novel association at rs78417682 (7p12/TNS3, P = 4.35 × 10

5 Article None 2018

Varga, Matthew G / Wang, Tianyi / Cai, Hui / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Gao, Yu-Tang / Ji, Bu-Tian / Pawlita, Michael / Waterboer, Tim / Zheng, Wei / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Epplein, Meira. ·Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. matthew.varga@med.unc.edu. · Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Department of Medical Oncology and Pancreatic Cancer Center, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Division of Epidemiology & Genetics, NCI, Bethesda, Maryland. · Division of Molecular Diagnostics of Oncogenic Infections, Research Program in Infection, Inflammation, and Cancer, German Cancer Research Center (DFKZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Population Health Sciences, Duke University and Cancer Control and Population Sciences Program, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #29263184.

ABSTRACT:

6 Article Prospective study of urinary prostaglandin E2 metabolite and pancreatic cancer risk. 2017

Cui, Yong / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Li, Hong-Lan / Yang, Gong / Wen, Wanqing / Gao, Yu-Tang / Cai, Qiuyin / Rothman, Nathaniel / Yin, Hui-Yong / Lan, Qing / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Zheng, Wei. ·Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 2525 West End Avenue, 8th Floor, Nashville, TN. · Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Division of Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD. · Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28815606.

ABSTRACT: The cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) pathway is upregulated in many pancreatic cancer cells, and it is believed that carcinogenetic effects of COX-2 upregulation are largely through prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) overproduction. We tested this hypothesis by evaluating the association between urinary PGE2 metabolites (PGE-M), a biomarker of in vivo PGE2 overproduction, and pancreatic cancer risk. We conducted a case-control study with 722 subjects (239 cases and 483 controls) nested within two prospective cohort studies, the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS) and Shanghai Men's Health Study (SMHS). Pre-diagnosis urine samples were measured for PGE-M using a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric method. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), with adjustment for potential confounders. Compared to those with the lowest urine level of PGE-M (the first quartile), individuals with higher urine levels of PGE-M had an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer, with adjusted ORs (95%CI) of 1.63 (0.98-2.73), 1.55 (0.90-2.69) and 1.94 (1.07-3.51), for the second to the fourth quartile groups, respectively (p for trend = 0.054). This dose-response positive association was more evident among those who had BMI <25 kg/m

7 Article Three new pancreatic cancer susceptibility signals identified on chromosomes 1q32.1, 5p15.33 and 8q24.21. 2016

Zhang, Mingfeng / Wang, Zhaoming / Obazee, Ofure / Jia, Jinping / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason / Figlioli, Gisella / Mocci, Evelina / Collins, Irene / Chung, Charles C / Hautman, Christopher / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Kamineni, Aruna / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Brais, Lauren / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Brenner, Hermann / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Boggi, Ugo / Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Iskierka-Jazdzewska, Elzbieta / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Neale, Rachel E / Oberg, Ann L / Panico, Salvatore / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Purdue, Mark / Quiros, J Ramón / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Scelo, Ghislaine / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Strobel, Oliver / Sund, Malin / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Taylor, Philip R / Tavano, Francesca / Travis, Ruth C / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vashist, Yogesh / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Kooperberg, Charles / Risch, Harvey A / Jacobs, Eric J / Li, Donghui / Fuchs, Charles / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Chanock, Stephen J / Petersen, Gloria M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Wolpin, Brian M / Kraft, Peter / Klein, Alison P / Canzian, Federico / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Oncology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA,. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy,. · Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · IGR, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research, and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. · National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II Univeristy, Naples, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Public Health and Participation Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgical and Peroperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27579533.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants at 13 chromosomal loci in individuals of European descent. To identify new susceptibility variants, we performed imputation based on 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project data and association analysis using 5,107 case and 8,845 control subjects from 27 cohort and case-control studies that participated in the PanScan I-III GWAS. This analysis, in combination with a two-staged replication in an additional 6,076 case and 7,555 control subjects from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control (PanC4) Consortia uncovered 3 new pancreatic cancer risk signals marked by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2816938 at chromosome 1q32.1 (per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, P = 4.88x10 -15), rs10094872 at 8q24.21 (OR = 1.15, P = 3.22x10 -9) and rs35226131 at 5p15.33 (OR = 0.71, P = 1.70x10 -8). These SNPs represent independent risk variants at previously identified pancreatic cancer risk loci on chr1q32.1 ( NR5A2), chr8q24.21 ( MYC) and chr5p15.33 ( CLPTM1L- TERT) as per analyses conditioned on previously reported susceptibility variants. We assessed expression of candidate genes at the three risk loci in histologically normal ( n = 10) and tumor ( n = 8) derived pancreatic tissue samples and observed a marked reduction of NR5A2 expression (chr1q32.1) in the tumors (fold change -7.6, P = 5.7x10 -8). This finding was validated in a second set of paired ( n = 20) histologically normal and tumor derived pancreatic tissue samples (average fold change for three NR5A2 isoforms -31.3 to -95.7, P = 7.5x10 -4-2.0x10 -3). Our study has identified new susceptibility variants independently conferring pancreatic cancer risk that merit functional follow-up to identify target genes and explain the underlying biology.

8 Article A prospective study of autoantibodies to Ezrin and pancreatic cancer risk. 2016

Sun, Yaqiong / Wu, Jie / Cai, Hui / Wang, Shuyang / Liu, Qiaolan / Blot, William J / Shu, Xiao Ou / Cai, Qiuyin. ·Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1161 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA. · Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China. · West China School of Public Health, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China. · International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, MD, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1161 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA. qiuyin.cai@vanderbilt.edu. ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #27146838.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: No biomarker is available for pancreatic cancer early detection, but a small prospective European study involving 16 cases and 32 controls raised the possibility that anti-Ezrin autoantibodies may be associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. We aimed to validate this finding in a case-control study nested within a prospective study in the USA. METHODS: Levels of anti-Ezrin autoantibodies were examined using ELISA in pre-diagnostic plasma samples of 73 cases and 145 matched controls. Paired t test and paired signed rank tests were used to determine the difference between two groups, and conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between anti-Ezrin autoantibody levels and risk of developing pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: No association was found between levels of anti-Ezrin plasma autoantibodies and subsequent risk of developing pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSION: Anti-Ezrin autoantibodies did not appear to be useful as a plasma biomarker for early detection of pancreatic cancer.

9 Article Disparities by Race, Age, and Sex in the Improvement of Survival for Major Cancers: Results From the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program in the United States, 1990 to 2010. 2015

Zeng, Chenjie / Wen, Wanqing / Morgans, Alicia K / Pao, William / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Zheng, Wei. ·Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee. ·JAMA Oncol · Pubmed #26182310.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Substantial progress has been made in cancer diagnosis and treatment, resulting in a steady improvement in cancer survival. The degree of improvement by age, race, and sex remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To quantify the degree of survival improvement over time by age, race, and sex in the United States. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Longitudinal analyses of cancer follow-up data from 1990 to 2010, from 1.02 million patients who had been diagnosed as having cancer of the colon or rectum, breast, prostate, lung, liver, pancreas, or ovary from 1990 to 2009 and who were included in 1 of 9 population-based registries of the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for cancer-specific death were estimated for patients diagnosed as having any of these cancers during 1995 to 1999, 2000 to 2004, and 2005 to 2009, compared with those diagnosed in 1990 to 1994. RESULTS: Significant improvements in survival were found for cancers of the colon or rectum, breast, prostate, lung, and liver. Improvements were more pronounced for younger patients. For patients aged 50 to 64 years and diagnosed from 2005 to 2009, adjusted HRs (95% CIs) were 0.57 (95% CI, 0.55-0.60), 0.48 (95% CI, 0.45-0.51), 0.61 (95% CI, 0.57-0.69), and 0.32 (95% CI, 0.30-0.36), for cancer of the colon or rectum, breast, liver, and prostate, respectively, compared with the same age groups of patients diagnosed during 1990 to 1994. However, the corresponding HRs (95% CIs) for elderly patients (those 75-85 years old) were only 0.88 (95% CI, 0.84-0.92), 0.88 (95% CI, 0.82-0.95), 0.76 (95% CI, 0.69-0.84), and 0.65 (95% CI, 0.61-0.70), for the same 4 cancer sites, respectively. A similar, although weaker, age-related period effect was observed for lung and pancreatic cancers. The adjusted HRs (95% CIs) for lung cancer were 0.75 (95% CI, 0.73-0.77) and 0.84 (95% CI, 0.81-0.86), respectively, for patients aged 50 to 64 years and 75 to 85 years diagnosed between 2005 and 2009, compared with the same age groups of patients diagnosed between 1990 and 1994 (0.73 [95% CI, 0.69-0.77] and 0.90 [95% CI, 0.85-0.95], respectively. Compared with whites or Asians, African Americans experienced greater improvement in prostate cancer survival. From 1990 to 2009, ovarian cancer survival declined among African Americans but improved among whites. No apparent sex difference in the degree of improvement for any non-sex-specific cancer was noted. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Younger patients experienced greater benefit from recent oncology advances than elderly patients. African Americans experienced poorer survival than whites for all cancers, and the racial difference decreased for prostate cancer but increased for ovarian cancer. Identifying factors associated with varied improvement in cancer survival can inform future improvements in cancer care for all.

10 Article Vitamin D metabolic pathway genes and pancreatic cancer risk. 2015

Arem, Hannah / Yu, Kai / Xiong, Xiaoqin / Moy, Kristin / Freedman, Neal D / Mayne, Susan T / Albanes, Demetrius / Arslan, Alan A / Austin, Melissa / Bamlet, William R / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige / Canzian, Federico / Cotterchio, Michelle / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steve / Giles, Graham G / Goggins, Michael / Goodman, Phyllis J / Hartge, Patricia / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Henderson, Brian / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert / Jacobs, Eric J / Kamineni, Aruna / Klein, Alison / Klein, Eric / Kolonel, Laurence N / Li, Donghui / Malats, Núria / Männistö, Satu / McCullough, Marjorie L / Olson, Sara H / Orlow, Irene / Peters, Ulrike / Petersen, Gloria M / Porta, Miquel / Severi, Gianluca / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Yu, Herbert / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Maeder, Dennis / Brotzman, Michelle / Risch, Harvey / Sampson, Joshua N / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America. · Information Management Systems, Inc., Calverton, Maryland, United States of America. · Yale School of Public Health/Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America. · Departments of Population Health, Obstetrics and Gynecology (Obs/Gyn) and Environmental Medicine, New York University, New York, New York, United States of America. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America. · Department of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States of America. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto; Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria and Centre for MEGA Epidemiology, School of Population Health, the University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Departments of Oncology, Pathology and Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. · Cleveland Clinic, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, United States of America. · MD Mercy, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. · Department of Preventative Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, United States of America. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America. · GroupHealth Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, United States of America. · University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Manoa, Hawaii, United States of America. · Molecular Pathology Program, Spanish National Cancer Research Center, Madrid, Spain. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, United States of America. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), and School of Medicine, Barcelona Spain. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, United States of America. · Westat, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #25799011.

ABSTRACT: Evidence on the association between vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. This inconsistency may be partially attributable to variation in vitamin D regulating genes. We selected 11 vitamin D-related genes (GC, DHCR7, CYP2R1, VDR, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, CYP27A1, RXRA, CRP2, CASR and CUBN) totaling 213 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and examined associations with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study included 3,583 pancreatic cancer cases and 7,053 controls from the genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer PanScans-I-III. We used the Adaptive Joint Test and the Adaptive Rank Truncated Product statistic for pathway and gene analyses, and unconditional logistic regression for SNP analyses, adjusting for age, sex, study and population stratification. We examined effect modification by circulating vitamin D concentration (≤50, >50 nmol/L) for the most significant SNPs using a subset of cohort cases (n = 713) and controls (n = 878). The vitamin D metabolic pathway was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p = 0.830). Of the individual genes, none were associated with pancreatic cancer risk at a significance level of p<0.05. SNPs near the VDR (rs2239186), LRP2 (rs4668123), CYP24A1 (rs2762932), GC (rs2282679), and CUBN (rs1810205) genes were the top SNPs associated with pancreatic cancer (p-values 0.008-0.037), but none were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Associations between these SNPs and pancreatic cancer were not modified by circulating concentrations of vitamin D. These findings do not support an association between vitamin D-related genes and pancreatic cancer risk. Future research should explore other pathways through which vitamin D status might be associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

11 Article Fine-mapping of the HNF1B multicancer locus identifies candidate variants that mediate endometrial cancer risk. 2015

Painter, Jodie N / O'Mara, Tracy A / Batra, Jyotsna / Cheng, Timothy / Lose, Felicity A / Dennis, Joe / Michailidou, Kyriaki / Tyrer, Jonathan P / Ahmed, Shahana / Ferguson, Kaltin / Healey, Catherine S / Kaufmann, Susanne / Hillman, Kristine M / Walpole, Carina / Moya, Leire / Pollock, Pamela / Jones, Angela / Howarth, Kimberley / Martin, Lynn / Gorman, Maggie / Hodgson, Shirley / Anonymous2970811 / Anonymous2980811 / De Polanco, Ma Magdalena Echeverry / Sans, Monica / Carracedo, Angel / Castellvi-Bel, Sergi / Rojas-Martinez, Augusto / Santos, Erika / Teixeira, Manuel R / Carvajal-Carmona, Luis / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Long, Jirong / Zheng, Wei / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Anonymous2990811 / Montgomery, Grant W / Webb, Penelope M / Scott, Rodney J / McEvoy, Mark / Attia, John / Holliday, Elizabeth / Martin, Nicholas G / Nyholt, Dale R / Henders, Anjali K / Fasching, Peter A / Hein, Alexander / Beckmann, Matthias W / Renner, Stefan P / Dörk, Thilo / Hillemanns, Peter / Dürst, Matthias / Runnebaum, Ingo / Lambrechts, Diether / Coenegrachts, Lieve / Schrauwen, Stefanie / Amant, Frederic / Winterhoff, Boris / Dowdy, Sean C / Goode, Ellen L / Teoman, Attila / Salvesen, Helga B / Trovik, Jone / Njolstad, Tormund S / Werner, Henrica M J / Ashton, Katie / Proietto, Tony / Otton, Geoffrey / Tzortzatos, Gerasimos / Mints, Miriam / Tham, Emma / Anonymous3000811 / Hall, Per / Czene, Kamila / Liu, Jianjun / Li, Jingmei / Hopper, John L / Southey, Melissa C / Anonymous3010811 / Ekici, Arif B / Ruebner, Matthias / Johnson, Nicola / Peto, Julian / Burwinkel, Barbara / Marme, Frederik / Brenner, Hermann / Dieffenbach, Aida K / Meindl, Alfons / Brauch, Hiltrud / Anonymous3020811 / Lindblom, Annika / Depreeuw, Jeroen / Moisse, Matthieu / Chang-Claude, Jenny / Rudolph, Anja / Couch, Fergus J / Olson, Janet E / Giles, Graham G / Bruinsma, Fiona / Cunningham, Julie M / Fridley, Brooke L / Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise / Kristensen, Vessela N / Cox, Angela / Swerdlow, Anthony J / Orr, Nicholas / Bolla, Manjeet K / Wang, Qin / Weber, Rachel Palmieri / Chen, Zhihua / Shah, Mitul / French, Juliet D / Pharoah, Paul D P / Dunning, Alison M / Tomlinson, Ian / Easton, Douglas F / Edwards, Stacey L / Thompson, Deborah J / Spurdle, Amanda B. ·QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Australian Prostate Cancer Research Centre-Qld, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, and School of Biomedical Science and. · Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Primary Care and. · Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation and School of Biomedical Science, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Department of Clinical Genetics, St George's Hospital Medical School, London, UK. · Grupo de Investigación Citogenética, Filogenia y Evolución de Poblaciones, Universidad del Tolima, Ibagué, Tolima, Colombia. · Department of Biological Anthropology, College of Humanities and Educational Sciences, University of the Republic, Magallanes, Montevideo, Uruguay. · Grupo de Medicina Xenómica, Fundación Galega de Medicina Xenómica (SERGAS) and CIBERER, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain, Center of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, KSA. · Genetic Predisposition to Colorectal Cancer Group, Gastrointestinal & Pancreatic Oncology Team, IDIBAPS/CIBERehd/Hospital Clínic, Centre Esther Koplowitz (CEK), Barcelona, Spain. · Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Pedro de Alba s/n, San Nicolás de Los Garza, Nuevo León, Mexico. · Hospital A.C. Camargo, São Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Genetics, Portuguese Oncology Institute, Porto, Portugal, Biomedical Sciences Institute (ICBAS), University of Porto, Porto, Portugal. · Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK, Grupo de Investigación Citogenética, Filogenia y Evolución de Poblaciones, Universidad del Tolima, Ibagué, Tolima, Colombia, Genome Center and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA. · Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai, China. · Hunter Medical Research Institute and, Hunter Area Pathology Service, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW, Australia, Centre for Information Based Medicine and School of Biomedical Science and Pharmacy. · Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine and Public Health. · Hunter Medical Research Institute and, Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine and Public Health. · Hunter Medical Research Institute and, Centre for Information Based Medicine and School of Medicine and Public Health. · Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. · University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Gynaecology Research Unit and. · Clinics of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. · Dept. of Gynaecology, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena, Germany. · Vesalius Research Center, VIB, Leuven, Belgium, Department of Oncology, Laboratory for Translational Genetics. · Division of Gynaecological Oncology, Department of Oncology, University Hospital Leuven, KU Leuven, Belgium. · Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Science Research and. · Department of Clinical Science, Centre for Cancerbiomarkers, The University of Bergen, Norway, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. · Hunter Area Pathology Service, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW, Australia, Faculty of Health, Centre for Information Based Medicine and the Discipline of Medical Genetics, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy and. · Faculty of Health, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia. · Department of Women's and Children's Health. · Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery and. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Human Genetics, Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health and. · Department of Pathology, Genetic Epidemiology Laboratory, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Institute of Human Genetics, University Hospital, Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre. · London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK. · Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Molecular Epidemiology, C080. · Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, National Center for Tumor Diseases, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Tumor Genetics, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch Institute of Clinical Pharmacology Stuttgart, University of Tuebingen, Germany. · Vesalius Research Center, VIB, Leuven, Belgium. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology/Clinical Cancer Registry and Institute for Medical Biometrics and Epidemiology, University Clinic Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, and Health Science Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health and Cancer Epidemiology Centre, The Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, Australia, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, The Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Department of Biostatistics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA. · Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway, Faculty of Medicine, The K.G. Jebsen Center for Breast Cancer Research, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway, Faculty of Medicine, The K.G. Jebsen Center for Breast Cancer Research, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway, Division of Medicine, Department of Clinical Molecular Oncology, Akershus University Hospital, Ahus, Norway. · Department of Oncology, Sheffield Cancer Research Centre, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. · Division of Genetics and Epidemiology and, Division of Breast Cancer Research, Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK. · Division of Breast Cancer Research, Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK. · Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA. · Division of Population Sciences, Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. · Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Primary Care and Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, amanda.spurdle@qimrberghofer.edu.au. ·Hum Mol Genet · Pubmed #25378557.

ABSTRACT: Common variants in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1B) gene are associated with the risk of Type II diabetes and multiple cancers. Evidence to date indicates that cancer risk may be mediated via genetic or epigenetic effects on HNF1B gene expression. We previously found single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the HNF1B locus to be associated with endometrial cancer, and now report extensive fine-mapping and in silico and laboratory analyses of this locus. Analysis of 1184 genotyped and imputed SNPs in 6608 Caucasian cases and 37 925 controls, and 895 Asian cases and 1968 controls, revealed the best signal of association for SNP rs11263763 (P = 8.4 × 10(-14), odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.82-0.89), located within HNF1B intron 1. Haplotype analysis and conditional analyses provide no evidence of further independent endometrial cancer risk variants at this locus. SNP rs11263763 genotype was associated with HNF1B mRNA expression but not with HNF1B methylation in endometrial tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genetic analyses prioritized rs11263763 and four other SNPs in high-to-moderate linkage disequilibrium as the most likely causal SNPs. Three of these SNPs map to the extended HNF1B promoter based on chromatin marks extending from the minimal promoter region. Reporter assays demonstrated that this extended region reduces activity in combination with the minimal HNF1B promoter, and that the minor alleles of rs11263763 or rs8064454 are associated with decreased HNF1B promoter activity. Our findings provide evidence for a single signal associated with endometrial cancer risk at the HNF1B locus, and that risk is likely mediated via altered HNF1B gene expression.

12 Article Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2014

Wolpin, Brian M / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Kraft, Peter / Kooperberg, Charles / Petersen, Gloria M / Wang, Zhaoming / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Canzian, Federico / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Jacobs, Eric J / Kamineni, Aruna / Klein, Alison P / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Li, Donghui / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Risch, Harvey A / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Austin, Melissa A / Barfield, Richard / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Brotzman, Michelle / Büchler, Markus W / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Bugert, Peter / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Chung, Charles / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Funel, Niccola / Gaziano, J Michael / Giese, Nathalia A / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gorman, Megan J / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Henderson, Brian E / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Innocenti, Federico / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / LaCroix, Andrea / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Nakamura, Yusuke / Oberg, Ann L / Owzar, Kouros / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Piepoli, Ada / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Taylor, Philip R / Theodoropoulos, George E / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Wu, Chen / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles / Chanock, Stephen J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2]. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2]. · 1] Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. [2]. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2] Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · 1] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [2] Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [3] New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · 1] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · The Cancer Research Center of Hawaii (retired), Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2] Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 1] Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. [2] Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy. · 1] INSERM, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, Villejuif, France. [2] University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France. [3] Institut Gustave Roussy (IGR), Villejuif, France. · Westat, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg-Hessen, Mannheim, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · 1] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [3] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Prevention and Research Center, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Prevention, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · 1] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · The University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Center for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · 1] Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. [2] Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. [3] Department of Nutrition, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · 1] Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · 1] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Epidemiology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', Opera di Padre Pio da Pietrelcina, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · 1] Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. [2] Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. [3] CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · 1] Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. [2] Departament de Ciències i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Toxicogenomics Unit, Center for Toxicology and Safety, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · 1st Propaideutic Surgical Department, Hippocration University Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. [3] Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [2] New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2]. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2] Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. [3]. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #25086665.

ABSTRACT: We performed a multistage genome-wide association study including 7,683 individuals with pancreatic cancer and 14,397 controls of European descent. Four new loci reached genome-wide significance: rs6971499 at 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT, per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-0.84, P = 3.0 × 10(-12)), rs7190458 at 16q23.1 (BCAR1/CTRB1/CTRB2, OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.30-1.65, P = 1.1 × 10(-10)), rs9581943 at 13q12.2 (PDX1, OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.10-1.20, P = 2.4 × 10(-9)) and rs16986825 at 22q12.1 (ZNRF3, OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.12-1.25, P = 1.2 × 10(-8)). We identified an independent signal in exon 2 of TERT at the established region 5p15.33 (rs2736098, OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.76-0.85, P = 9.8 × 10(-14)). We also identified a locus at 8q24.21 (rs1561927, P = 1.3 × 10(-7)) that approached genome-wide significance located 455 kb telomeric of PVT1. Our study identified multiple new susceptibility alleles for pancreatic cancer that are worthy of follow-up studies.

13 Article Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33. 2014

Wang, Zhaoming / Zhu, Bin / Zhang, Mingfeng / Parikh, Hemang / Jia, Jinping / Chung, Charles C / Sampson, Joshua N / Hoskins, Jason W / Hutchinson, Amy / Burdette, Laurie / Ibrahim, Abdisamad / Hautman, Christopher / Raj, Preethi S / Abnet, Christian C / Adjei, Andrew A / Ahlbom, Anders / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Ambrosone, Christine B / Aldrich, Melinda / Amiano, Pilar / Amos, Christopher / Andersson, Ulrika / Andriole, Gerald / Andrulis, Irene L / Arici, Cecilia / Arslan, Alan A / Austin, Melissa A / Baris, Dalsu / Barkauskas, Donald A / Bassig, Bryan A / Beane Freeman, Laura E / Berg, Christine D / Berndt, Sonja I / Bertazzi, Pier Alberto / Biritwum, Richard B / Black, Amanda / Blot, William / Boeing, Heiner / Boffetta, Paolo / Bolton, Kelly / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bracci, Paige M / Brennan, Paul / Brinton, Louise A / Brotzman, Michelle / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Buring, Julie E / Butler, Mary Ann / Cai, Qiuyin / Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine / Canzian, Federico / Cao, Guangwen / Caporaso, Neil E / Carrato, Alfredo / Carreon, Tania / Carta, Angela / Chang, Gee-Chen / Chang, I-Shou / Chang-Claude, Jenny / Che, Xu / Chen, Chien-Jen / Chen, Chih-Yi / Chen, Chung-Hsing / Chen, Constance / Chen, Kuan-Yu / Chen, Yuh-Min / Chokkalingam, Anand P / Chu, Lisa W / Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise / Colditz, Graham A / Colt, Joanne S / Conti, David / Cook, Michael B / Cortessis, Victoria K / Crawford, E David / Cussenot, Olivier / Davis, Faith G / De Vivo, Immaculata / Deng, Xiang / Ding, Ti / Dinney, Colin P / Di Stefano, Anna Luisa / Diver, W Ryan / Duell, Eric J / Elena, Joanne W / Fan, Jin-Hu / Feigelson, Heather Spencer / Feychting, Maria / Figueroa, Jonine D / Flanagan, Adrienne M / Fraumeni, Joseph F / Freedman, Neal D / Fridley, Brooke L / Fuchs, Charles S / Gago-Dominguez, Manuela / Gallinger, Steven / Gao, Yu-Tang / Gapstur, Susan M / Garcia-Closas, Montserrat / Garcia-Closas, Reina / Gastier-Foster, Julie M / Gaziano, J Michael / Gerhard, Daniela S / Giffen, Carol A / Giles, Graham G / Gillanders, Elizabeth M / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gokgoz, Nalan / Goldstein, Alisa M / Gonzalez, Carlos / Gorlick, Richard / Greene, Mark H / Gross, Myron / Grossman, H Barton / Grubb, Robert / Gu, Jian / Guan, Peng / Haiman, Christopher A / Hallmans, Goran / Hankinson, Susan E / Harris, Curtis C / Hartge, Patricia / Hattinger, Claudia / Hayes, Richard B / He, Qincheng / Helman, Lee / Henderson, Brian E / Henriksson, Roger / Hoffman-Bolton, Judith / Hohensee, Chancellor / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hong, Yun-Chul / Hoover, Robert N / Hosgood, H Dean / Hsiao, Chin-Fu / Hsing, Ann W / Hsiung, Chao Agnes / Hu, Nan / Hu, Wei / Hu, Zhibin / Huang, Ming-Shyan / Hunter, David J / Inskip, Peter D / Ito, Hidemi / Jacobs, Eric J / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Ji, Bu-Tian / Johansen, Christoffer / Johansson, Mattias / Johnson, Alison / Kaaks, Rudolf / Kamat, Ashish M / Kamineni, Aruna / Karagas, Margaret / Khanna, Chand / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Kim, Christopher / Kim, In-Sam / Kim, Jin Hee / Kim, Yeul Hong / Kim, Young-Chul / Kim, Young Tae / Kang, Chang Hyun / Jung, Yoo Jin / Kitahara, Cari M / Klein, Alison P / Klein, Robert / Kogevinas, Manolis / Koh, Woon-Puay / Kohno, Takashi / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kooperberg, Charles / Kratz, Christian P / Krogh, Vittorio / Kunitoh, Hideo / Kurtz, Robert C / Kurucu, Nilgun / Lan, Qing / Lathrop, Mark / Lau, Ching C / Lecanda, Fernando / Lee, Kyoung-Mu / Lee, Maxwell P / Le Marchand, Loic / Lerner, Seth P / Li, Donghui / Liao, Linda M / Lim, Wei-Yen / Lin, Dongxin / Lin, Jie / Lindstrom, Sara / Linet, Martha S / Lissowska, Jolanta / Liu, Jianjun / Ljungberg, Börje / Lloreta, Josep / Lu, Daru / Ma, Jing / Malats, Nuria / Mannisto, Satu / Marina, Neyssa / Mastrangelo, Giuseppe / Matsuo, Keitaro / McGlynn, Katherine A / McKean-Cowdin, Roberta / McNeill, Lorna H / McWilliams, Robert R / Melin, Beatrice S / Meltzer, Paul S / Mensah, James E / Miao, Xiaoping / Michaud, Dominique S / Mondul, Alison M / Moore, Lee E / Muir, Kenneth / Niwa, Shelley / Olson, Sara H / Orr, Nick / Panico, Salvatore / Park, Jae Yong / Patel, Alpa V / Patino-Garcia, Ana / Pavanello, Sofia / Peeters, Petra H M / Peplonska, Beata / Peters, Ulrike / Petersen, Gloria M / Picci, Piero / Pike, Malcolm C / Porru, Stefano / Prescott, Jennifer / Pu, Xia / Purdue, Mark P / Qiao, You-Lin / Rajaraman, Preetha / Riboli, Elio / Risch, Harvey A / Rodabough, Rebecca J / Rothman, Nathaniel / Ruder, Avima M / Ryu, Jeong-Seon / Sanson, Marc / Schned, Alan / Schumacher, Fredrick R / Schwartz, Ann G / Schwartz, Kendra L / Schwenn, Molly / Scotlandi, Katia / Seow, Adeline / Serra, Consol / Serra, Massimo / Sesso, Howard D / Severi, Gianluca / Shen, Hongbing / Shen, Min / Shete, Sanjay / Shiraishi, Kouya / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Siddiq, Afshan / Sierrasesumaga, Luis / Sierri, Sabina / Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart / Silverman, Debra T / Simon, Matthias / Southey, Melissa C / Spector, Logan / Spitz, Margaret / Stampfer, Meir / Stattin, Par / Stern, Mariana C / Stevens, Victoria L / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Stram, Daniel O / Strom, Sara S / Su, Wu-Chou / Sund, Malin / Sung, Sook Whan / Swerdlow, Anthony / Tan, Wen / Tanaka, Hideo / Tang, Wei / Tang, Ze-Zhang / Tardon, Adonina / Tay, Evelyn / Taylor, Philip R / Tettey, Yao / Thomas, David M / Tirabosco, Roberto / Tjonneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Toro, Jorge R / Travis, Ruth C / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Troisi, Rebecca / Truelove, Ann / Tsai, Ying-Huang / Tucker, Margaret A / Tumino, Rosario / Van Den Berg, David / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vermeulen, Roel / Vineis, Paolo / Visvanathan, Kala / Vogel, Ulla / Wang, Chaoyu / Wang, Chengfeng / Wang, Junwen / Wang, Sophia S / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Wheeler, William / White, Emily / Wiencke, John K / Wolk, Alicja / Wolpin, Brian M / Wong, Maria Pik / Wrensch, Margaret / Wu, Chen / Wu, Tangchun / Wu, Xifeng / Wu, Yi-Long / Wunder, Jay S / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Xu, Jun / Yang, Hannah P / Yang, Pan-Chyr / Yatabe, Yasushi / Ye, Yuanqing / Yeboah, Edward D / Yin, Zhihua / Ying, Chen / Yu, Chong-Jen / Yu, Kai / Yuan, Jian-Min / Zanetti, Krista A / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Zhou, Baosen / Mirabello, Lisa / Savage, Sharon A / Kraft, Peter / Chanock, Stephen J / Yeager, Meredith / Landi, Maria Terese / Shi, Jianxin / Chatterjee, Nilanjan / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics. · Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, PO BOX 77, Accra, Ghana, University of Ghana Medical School, PO Box 4236, Accra, Ghana. · Unit of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine. · Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Cancer Prevention and Control, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain, CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica, Madrid, Spain. · Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA. · Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. · Division of Urologic Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA. · Litwin Centre for Cancer Genetics, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mt Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences and Public Health, University of Brescia, Italy. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA, New York University Cancer Institute, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics Division, Keck School of Medicine and. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Division of Cancer Prevention. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Department of Preventive Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Policlinico Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA, International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, MD, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Germany. · Institute for Translational Epidemiology, Hematology and Medical Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 2RE, UK. · Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM) and Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France. · Westat, Rockville, MD, USA. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · CeRePP, Paris, France, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC n°5, ONCOTYPE-URO, Paris, France. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China. · Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, Division of Chest Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · National Institute of Cancer Research. · Department of Abdominal Surgery and. · Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Graduate Institute of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Cancer Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology. · Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine and Chest Department, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan. · School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA. · Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, CA, USA. · Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), Villejuif, France. · Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA. · Urologic Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA. · CeRePP, Paris, France, AP-HP, Department of Urology, Tenon Hospital, GHU-Est, Paris, France, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC n°5, ONCOTYPE-URO, Paris, France. · Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2R3. · Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Channing Division of Network Medicine and Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Shanxi Cancer Hospital, Taiyuan, Shanxi, People's Republic of China. · Department of Urology. · Service de Neurologie Mazarin, GH Pitie-Salpetriere, APHP, and UMR 975 INSERM-UPMC, CRICM, Paris, France. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. · Institute for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente, Denver, CO, USA. · UCL Cancer Institute, Huntley Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex HA7 4LP, UK. · Department of Biostatistics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA, Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine. · Genomic Medicine Group, Galician Foundation of Genomic Medicine, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago, Servicio Galego de Saude (SERGAS), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Santiago (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute and. · Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotaong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Division of Genetics and Epidemiology, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, UK. · Unidad de Investigación, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Spain. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, and The Ohio State University Department of Pathology and Pediatrics, Columbus, OH, USA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine and Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA, Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA. · Office of Cancer Genomics, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Information Management Services Inc., Calverton, MD, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, The Cancer Council Victoria & Centre for Molecular, Environmental, Genetic, and Analytic Epidemiology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences and. · Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Nutrition and. · Department of Oncology, Department of Pathology and Department of Medicine, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, The Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, NY, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Urology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Epidemiology. · Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, China. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Nutritional Research. · Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine. · Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Orthopaedic Rizzoli Institute, Bologna, Italy. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Population Health, New York University Langone Medical Center and Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York University Cancer Institute, New York, NY, USA. · Center for Cancer Research and. · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA. · Institute of Environmental Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea, Department of Preventive Medicine and. · Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. · Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Institute of Population Health Sciences and Taiwan Lung Cancer Tissue/Specimen Information Resource Center, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Taiwan. · Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, CA, USA, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. · Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Institute of Population Health Sciences and. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Cancer Center, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. · Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Channing Division of Network Medicine and Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Division of Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA, Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA, Bioinformed, LLC, Gaithersburg, MD, USA. · Department of Oncology, Finsen Center, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark, Unit of Survivorship, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. · Vermont Cancer Registry, Burlington, VT, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, UK. · Department of Biochemistry and Department of Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea. · Institute of Environmental Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Genomic Research Center for Lung and Breast/Ovarian Cancers, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea, Department of Internal Medicine and Division of Brain and Division of Oncology/Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Lung and Esophageal Cancer Clinic, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun-eup, Republic of Korea. · Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Oncology, Department of Pathology and Department of Medicine, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Medicine and. · Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain, IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona, Spain, CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore, Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore. · Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, USA. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy. · Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Mitsui Memorial Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Pediatric Oncology, A.Y. Ankara Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Yenimahalle- Ankara, Turkey. · Centre National de Genotypage, IG/CEA, Evry Cedex, France, Centre d'Étude du Polymorphism Humain (CEPH), Paris, France. · Texas Children's Cancer and Hematology Centers. · Department of Pediatrics, University Clinic of Navarra, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Department of Preventive Medicine and Department of Environmental Health, Korea National Open University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Scott Department of Urology and. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology. · Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore. · State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. · Human Genetics Division, Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore, School of Life Sciences, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, China. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology and. · CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. · Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Contemporary Anthropology, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, China, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. · Department of Medicine, Channing Division of Network Medicine and Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas, Melchor Fernández Almagro, 3, Madrid E-28029, Spain. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA. · Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Sciences, University of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan, Department of Preventive Medicine, Kyushu University Faculty of Medical Scicence, Fukuoka, Japan. · Department of Health Disparities Research, Division of OVP, Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences, and Center for Community-Engaged Translational Research, Duncan Family Institute and. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Key Laboratory for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Sciences and Technology, Wuhan, China. · Department of Epidemiology, Division of Biology and Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA. · Health Sciences Research Institute, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Complex Traits Genetics Team and. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Department of Biochemistry and Department of Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea, Lung Cancer Center, Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Daegu, Republic of Korea. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Cancer Institute (Hospital), Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon, Korea. · Karmanos Cancer Institute and Department of Oncology and. · Karmanos Cancer Institute and Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA. · Maine Cancer Registry, Augusta, ME, USA. · Centre for Research in Occupational Health, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP). · Department of Biostatistics, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Genomics of Common Disease, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, China. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bonn Medical Center, Bonn, Germany. · Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Dan L. Duncan Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Division of Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital and College of Medicine, Tainan, Taiwan. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences/Surgery, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul St Mary's Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. · Division of Genetics and Epidemiology, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, UK, Division of Breast Cancer Research, Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK. · Instituto Universitario de Oncología, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain. · Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, St Andrew's Place, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex HA7 4LP, UK. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan. · Cancer Registry Associazione Iblea Ricerca Epidemiologica, Onlus and Asp Ragusa, Ragusa Italy. · Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA. · Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Imperial College, London, UK, Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Torino Italy. · National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Soborg, Denmark. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA, Department of Biochemistry and Centre for Genomic Sciences, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. · Division of Cancer Etiology, Department of Population Sciences, City of Hope and the Beckman Research Institute, Duarte, CA, USA. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway, Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, Finland. · University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Pathology and. · Guangdong Lung Cancer Institute, Medical Research Center and Cancer Center of Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, China. · School of Public Health, Li Ka Shing (LKS) Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · Department of Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital and. · University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA and. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA, New York University Cancer Institute, New York, NY, USA. · Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Hum Mol Genet · Pubmed #25027329.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci.

14 Article Genome-wide association study of survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2014

Wu, Chen / Kraft, Peter / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Steplowski, Emily / Brotzman, Michelle / Xu, Mousheng / Mudgal, Poorva / Amundadottir, Laufey / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / Kooperberg, Charles / Petersen, Gloria M / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Cao, Guangwen / Duell, Eric J / Elena, Joanne W / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hallmans, Goran / Hutchinson, Amy / Hunter, David J / Jenab, Mazda / Jiang, Guoliang / Khaw, Kay-Tee / LaCroix, Andrea / Li, Zhaoshen / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Panico, Salvatore / Patel, Alpa V / Qian, Zhi Rong / Riboli, Elio / Sesso, Howard / Shen, Hongbing / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Tjonneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Visvanathan, Kala / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Chengfeng / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Chanock, Stephen / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles S / Lin, Dongxin / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, , Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #23180869.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Survival of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma is limited and few prognostic factors are known. We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify germline variants associated with survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS: We analysed overall survival in relation to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among 1005 patients from two large GWAS datasets, PanScan I and ChinaPC. Cox proportional hazards regression was used in an additive genetic model with adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage and the top four principal components of population stratification. The first stage included 642 cases of European ancestry (PanScan), from which the top SNPs (p≤10(-5)) were advanced to a joint analysis with 363 additional patients from China (ChinaPC). RESULTS: In the first stage of cases of European descent, the top-ranked loci were at chromosomes 11p15.4, 18p11.21 and 1p36.13, tagged by rs12362504 (p=1.63×10(-7)), rs981621 (p=1.65×10(-7)) and rs16861827 (p=3.75×10(-7)), respectively. 131 SNPs with p≤10(-5) were advanced to a joint analysis with cases from the ChinaPC study. In the joint analysis, the top-ranked SNP was rs10500715 (minor allele frequency, 0.37; p=1.72×10(-7)) on chromosome 11p15.4, which is intronic to the SET binding factor 2 (SBF2) gene. The HR (95% CI) for death was 0.74 (0.66 to 0.84) in PanScan I, 0.79 (0.65 to 0.97) in ChinaPC and 0.76 (0.68 to 0.84) in the joint analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Germline genetic variation in the SBF2 locus was associated with overall survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma of European and Asian ancestry. This association should be investigated in additional large patient cohorts.

15 Article An absolute risk model to identify individuals at elevated risk for pancreatic cancer in the general population. 2013

Klein, Alison P / Lindström, Sara / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Steplowski, Emily / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Lacroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria M / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Zheng, Wei / Amundadottir, Laufey / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Bamlet, William R / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Bracci, Paige M / Canzian, Federico / Clipp, Sandra / Cotterchio, Michelle / Duell, Eric J / Elena, Joanne / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hassan, Manal / Hutchinson, Amy / Hunter, David J / Kooperberg, Charles / Kurtz, Robert C / Liu, Simin / Overvad, Kim / Palli, Domenico / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Slimani, Nadia / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vineis, Paolo / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Chanock, Stephen J / Hoover, Robert N / Hartge, Patricia / Kraft, Peter. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America ; Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America ; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #24058443.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: We developed an absolute risk model to identify individuals in the general population at elevated risk of pancreatic cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using data on 3,349 cases and 3,654 controls from the PanScan Consortium, we developed a relative risk model for men and women of European ancestry based on non-genetic and genetic risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We estimated absolute risks based on these relative risks and population incidence rates. RESULTS: Our risk model included current smoking (multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval: 2.20 [1.84-2.62]), heavy alcohol use (>3 drinks/day) (OR: 1.45 [1.19-1.76]), obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)) (OR: 1.26 [1.09-1.45]), diabetes >3 years (nested case-control OR: 1.57 [1.13-2.18], case-control OR: 1.80 [1.40-2.32]), family history of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.60 [1.20-2.12]), non-O ABO genotype (AO vs. OO genotype) (OR: 1.23 [1.10-1.37]) to (BB vs. OO genotype) (OR 1.58 [0.97-2.59]), rs3790844(chr1q32.1) (OR: 1.29 [1.19-1.40]), rs401681(5p15.33) (OR: 1.18 [1.10-1.26]) and rs9543325(13q22.1) (OR: 1.27 [1.18-1.36]). The areas under the ROC curve for risk models including only non-genetic factors, only genetic factors, and both non-genetic and genetic factors were 58%, 57% and 61%, respectively. We estimate that fewer than 3/1,000 U.S. non-Hispanic whites have more than a 5% predicted lifetime absolute risk. CONCLUSION: Although absolute risk modeling using established risk factors may help to identify a group of individuals at higher than average risk of pancreatic cancer, the immediate clinical utility of our model is limited. However, a risk model can increase awareness of the various risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including modifiable behaviors.

16 Article Polymorphisms in genes related to one-carbon metabolism are not related to pancreatic cancer in PanScan and PanC4. 2013

Leenders, Max / Bhattacharjee, Samsiddhi / Vineis, Paolo / Stevens, Victoria / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Amundadottir, Laufey / Gross, Myron / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Arslan, Alan A / Duell, Eric J / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Klein, Alison P / Kooperberg, Charles / LaCroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria / Risch, Harvey A / Yu, Kai / Wolpin, Brian M / Zheng, Wei / Agalliu, Ilir / Albanes, Demetrius / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chang, Kenneth / Chanock, Stephen J / Cotterchio, Michelle / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovanucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoffman-Bolton, Judith A / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Kraft, Peter / Krogh, Vittorio / Kurtz, Robert C / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Riboli, Elio / Tjønneland, Anne / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Visvanathan, Kala / Elena, Joanne W / Yu, Herbert / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, UK. M.Leenders-6@umcutrecht.nl ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #23334854.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The evidence of a relation between folate intake and one-carbon metabolism (OCM) with pancreatic cancer (PanCa) is inconsistent. In this study, the association between genes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to OCM and PanCa was assessed. METHODS: Using biochemical knowledge of the OCM pathway, we identified thirty-seven genes and 834 SNPs to examine in association with PanCa. Our study included 1,408 cases and 1,463 controls nested within twelve cohorts (PanScan). The ten SNPs and five genes with lowest p values (<0.02) were followed up in 2,323 cases and 2,340 controls from eight case-control studies (PanC4) that participated in PanScan2. The correlation of SNPs with metabolite levels was assessed for 649 controls from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. RESULTS: When both stages were combined, we observed suggestive associations with PanCa for rs10887710 (MAT1A) (OR 1.13, 95 %CI 1.04-1.23), rs1552462 (SYT9) (OR 1.27, 95 %CI 1.02-1.59), and rs7074891 (CUBN) (OR 1.91, 95 %CI 1.12-3.26). After correcting for multiple comparisons, no significant associations were observed in either the first or second stage. The three suggested SNPs showed no correlations with one-carbon biomarkers. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest genetic study to date to examine the relation between germline variations in OCM-related genes polymorphisms and the risk of PanCa. Suggestive evidence for an association between polymorphisms and PanCa was observed among the cohort-nested studies, but this did not replicate in the case-control studies. Our results do not strongly support the hypothesis that genes related to OCM play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

17 Article Diabetes and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium. 2013

Elena, Joanne W / Steplowski, Emily / Yu, Kai / Hartge, Patricia / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Brotzman, Michelle J / Chanock, Stephen J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / LaCroix, Andrea / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Amundadottir, Laufey / Bao, Ying / Boeing, Heiner / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Duell, Eric J / Hallmans, Göran / Howard, Barbara V / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Kooperberg, Charles / Kraft, Peter / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Michaud, Dominique S / Palli, Domenico / Phillips, Lawrence S / Overvad, Kim / Patel, Alpa V / Sansbury, Leah / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Simon, Michael S / Slimani, Nadia / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Visvanathan, Kala / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wolpin, Brian M / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Fuchs, Charles S / Hoover, Robert N / Gross, Myron. ·Division of Cancer Control and Population Science, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. elenajw@mail.nih.gov ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #23112111.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Diabetes is a suspected risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but questions remain about whether it is a risk factor or a result of the disease. This study prospectively examined the association between diabetes and the risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in pooled data from the NCI pancreatic cancer cohort consortium (PanScan). METHODS: The pooled data included 1,621 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases and 1,719 matched controls from twelve cohorts using a nested case-control study design. Subjects who were diagnosed with diabetes near the time (<2 years) of pancreatic cancer diagnosis were excluded from all analyses. All analyses were adjusted for age, race, gender, study, alcohol use, smoking, BMI, and family history of pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: Self-reported diabetes was associated with a forty percent increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI: 1.07, 1.84). The association differed by duration of diabetes; risk was highest for those with a duration of 2-8 years (OR = 1.79, 95 % CI: 1.25, 2.55); there was no association for those with 9+ years of diabetes (OR = 1.02, 95 % CI: 0.68, 1.52). CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide support for a relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk. The absence of association in those with the longest duration of diabetes may reflect hypoinsulinemia and warrants further investigation.

18 Article Association of body mass index and risk of death from pancreas cancer in Asians: findings from the Asia Cohort Consortium. 2013

Lin, Yingsong / Fu, Rong / Grant, Eric / Chen, Yu / Lee, Jung Eun / Gupta, Prakash C / Ramadas, Kunnambath / Inoue, Manami / Tsugane, Shoichiro / Gao, Yu-Tang / Tamakoshi, Akiko / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Ozasa, Kotaro / Tsuji, Ichiro / Kakizaki, Masako / Tanaka, Hideo / Chen, Chien-Jen / Yoo, Keun-Young / Ahn, Yoon-Ok / Ahsan, Habibul / Pednekar, Mangesh S / Sauvaget, Catherine / Sasazuki, Shizuka / Yang, Gong / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Ohishi, Waka / Watanabe, Takashi / Nishino, Yoshikazu / Matsuo, Keitaro / You, San-Lin / Park, Sue K / Kim, Dong-Hyun / Parvez, Faruque / Rolland, Betsy / McLerran, Dale / Sinha, Rashmi / Boffetta, Paolo / Zheng, Wei / Thornquist, Mark / Feng, Ziding / Kang, Daehee / Potter, John D. ·Department of Public Health, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan. linys@aichi-med-u.ac.jp ·Eur J Cancer Prev · Pubmed #23044748.

ABSTRACT: We aimed to examine the association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in a pooled analysis of data from the Asia Cohort Consortium. The data for this pooled analysis included 883 529 men and women from 16 cohort studies in Asian countries. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for pancreas cancer mortality in relation to BMI. Seven predefined BMI categories (<18.5, 18.5-19.9, 20.0-22.4, 22.5-24.9, 25.0-27.4, 27.5-29.9, ≥ 30) were used in the analysis, with BMI of 22.5-24.9 serving as the reference group. The multivariable analyses were adjusted for known risk factors, including age, smoking, and a history of diabetes. We found no statistically significant overall association between each BMI category and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in all Asians, and obesity was unrelated to the risk of mortality in both East Asians and South Asians. Age, smoking, and a history of diabetes did not modify the association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer. In planned subgroup analyses among East Asians, an increased risk of death from pancreas cancer among those with a BMI less than 18.5 was observed for individuals with a history of diabetes; hazard ratio=2.01 (95% confidence interval: 1.01-4.00) (P for interaction=0.07). The data do not support an association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in these Asian populations.

19 Article Pathway analysis of genome-wide association study data highlights pancreatic development genes as susceptibility factors for pancreatic cancer. 2012

Li, Donghui / Duell, Eric J / Yu, Kai / Risch, Harvey A / Olson, Sara H / Kooperberg, Charles / Wolpin, Brian M / Jiao, Li / Dong, Xiaoqun / Wheeler, Bill / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Gross, Myron / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Klein, Alison P / LaCroix, Andrea / Mandelson, Margaret T / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Agalliu, Ilir / Albanes, Demetrius / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chang, Kenneth / Chanock, Stephen J / Cotterchio, Michelle / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoffman Bolton, Judith A / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Kraft, Peter / Krogh, Vittorio / Kurtz, Robert C / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Riboli, Elio / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Visvanathan, Kala / Watters, Joanne / Yu, Herbert / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Amundadottir, Laufey / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #22523087.

ABSTRACT: Four loci have been associated with pancreatic cancer through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Pathway-based analysis of GWAS data is a complementary approach to identify groups of genes or biological pathways enriched with disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose individual effect sizes may be too small to be detected by standard single-locus methods. We used the adaptive rank truncated product method in a pathway-based analysis of GWAS data from 3851 pancreatic cancer cases and 3934 control participants pooled from 12 cohort studies and 8 case-control studies (PanScan). We compiled 23 biological pathways hypothesized to be relevant to pancreatic cancer and observed a nominal association between pancreatic cancer and five pathways (P < 0.05), i.e. pancreatic development, Helicobacter pylori lacto/neolacto, hedgehog, Th1/Th2 immune response and apoptosis (P = 2.0 × 10(-6), 1.6 × 10(-5), 0.0019, 0.019 and 0.023, respectively). After excluding previously identified genes from the original GWAS in three pathways (NR5A2, ABO and SHH), the pancreatic development pathway remained significant (P = 8.3 × 10(-5)), whereas the others did not. The most significant genes (P < 0.01) in the five pathways were NR5A2, HNF1A, HNF4G and PDX1 for pancreatic development; ABO for H.pylori lacto/neolacto; SHH for hedgehog; TGFBR2 and CCL18 for Th1/Th2 immune response and MAPK8 and BCL2L11 for apoptosis. Our results provide a link between inherited variation in genes important for pancreatic development and cancer and show that pathway-based approaches to analysis of GWAS data can yield important insights into the collective role of genetic risk variants in cancer.

20 Article Variant ABO blood group alleles, secretor status, and risk of pancreatic cancer: results from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium. 2010

Wolpin, Brian M / Kraft, Peter / Xu, Mousheng / Steplowski, Emily / Olsson, Martin L / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / LaCroix, Andrea / Petersen, Gloria / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Amundadottir, Laufey / Austin, Melissa A / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chanock, Stephen J / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoover, Robert N / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Kooperberg, Charles / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Michaud, Dominique S / Overvad, Kim / Patel, Alpa V / Sanchéz, Maria-José / Sansbury, Leah / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Slimani, Nadia / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vineis, Paolo / Visvanathan, Kala / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Watters, Joanne / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles S. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. bwolpin@partners.org ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #20971884.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Subjects with non-O ABO blood group alleles have increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Glycosyltransferase activity is greater for the A(1) versus A(2) variant, whereas O01 and O02 variants are nonfunctioning. We hypothesized: 1) A(1) allele would confer greater risk than A(2) allele, 2) protective effect of the O allele would be equivalent for O01 and O02 variants, 3) secretor phenotype would modify the association with risk. METHODS: We determined ABO variants and secretor phenotype from single nucleotide polymorphisms in ABO and FUT2 genes in 1,533 cases and 1,582 controls from 12 prospective cohort studies. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) for pancreatic cancer were calculated using logistic regression. RESULTS: An increased risk was observed in participants with A(1) but not A(2) alleles. Compared with subjects with genotype O/O, genotypes A(2)/O, A(2)/A(1), A(1)/O, and A(1)/A(1) had ORs of 0.96 (95% CI, 0.72-1.26), 1.46 (95% CI, 0.98-2.17), 1.48 (95% CI, 1.23-1.78), and 1.71 (95% CI, 1.18-2.47). Risk was similar for O01 and O02 variant O alleles. Compared with O01/O01, the ORs for each additional allele of O02, A(1), and A(2) were 1.00 (95% CI, 0.87-1.14), 1.38 (95% CI, 1.20-1.58), and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.77-1.20); P, O01 versus O02 = 0.94, A(1) versus A(2) = 0.004. Secretor phenotype was not an effect modifier (P-interaction = 0.63). CONCLUSIONS: Among participants in a large prospective cohort consortium, ABO allele subtypes corresponding to increased glycosyltransferase activity were associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk. IMPACT: These data support the hypothesis that ABO glycosyltransferase activity influences pancreatic cancer risk rather than actions of other nearby genes on chromosome 9q34.

21 Article Correlates of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D: Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers. 2010

McCullough, Marjorie L / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Freedman, D Michal / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Flanders, W Dana / Koenig, Karen / Kolonel, Laurence / Laden, Francine / Le Marchand, Loic / Purdue, Mark / Snyder, Kirk / Stevens, Victoria L / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Virtamo, Jarmo / Yang, Gong / Yu, Kai / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Ashby, Jason / Bertrand, Kimberly / Cai, Hui / Chen, Yu / Gallicchio, Lisa / Giovannucci, Edward / Jacobs, Eric J / Hankinson, Susan E / Hartge, Patricia / Hartmuller, Virginia / Harvey, Chinonye / Hayes, Richard B / Horst, Ronald L / Shu, Xiao-Ou. ·American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia 30303-1002, USA. marji.mccullough@cancer.org ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #20562191.

ABSTRACT: Low vitamin D status is common globally and is associated with multiple disease outcomes. Understanding the correlates of vitamin D status will help guide clinical practice, research, and interpretation of studies. Correlates of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations measured in a single laboratory were examined in 4,723 cancer-free men and women from 10 cohorts participating in the Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers, which covers a worldwide geographic area. Demographic and lifestyle characteristics were examined in relation to 25(OH)D using stepwise linear regression and polytomous logistic regression. The prevalence of 25(OH)D concentrations less than 25 nmol/L ranged from 3% to 36% across cohorts, and the prevalence of 25(OH)D concentrations less than 50 nmol/L ranged from 29% to 82%. Seasonal differences in circulating 25(OH)D were most marked among whites from northern latitudes. Statistically significant positive correlates of 25(OH)D included male sex, summer blood draw, vigorous physical activity, vitamin D intake, fish intake, multivitamin use, and calcium supplement use. Significant inverse correlates were body mass index, winter and spring blood draw, history of diabetes, sedentary behavior, smoking, and black race/ethnicity. Correlates varied somewhat within season, race/ethnicity, and sex. These findings help identify persons at risk for low vitamin D status for both clinical and research purposes.

22 Article Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the risk of rarer cancers: Design and methods of the Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers. 2010

Gallicchio, Lisa / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Chow, Wong-Ho / Freedman, D Michal / Hankinson, Susan E / Hartge, Patricia / Hartmuller, Virginia / Harvey, Chinonye / Hayes, Richard B / Horst, Ronald L / Koenig, Karen L / Kolonel, Laurence N / Laden, Francine / McCullough, Marjorie L / Parisi, Dominick / Purdue, Mark P / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Snyder, Kirk / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Tworoger, Shelley S / Varanasi, Arti / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wilkens, Lynne R / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Bertrand, Kimberly / Weinstein, Stephanie J. ·Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland 21202, USA. lgallic@mdmercy.com ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #20562188.

ABSTRACT: The Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers (VDPP), a consortium of 10 prospective cohort studies from the United States, Finland, and China, was formed to examine the associations between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations and the risk of rarer cancers. Cases (total n = 5,491) included incident primary endometrial (n = 830), kidney (n = 775), ovarian (n = 516), pancreatic (n = 952), and upper gastrointestinal tract (n = 1,065) cancers and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 1,353) diagnosed in the participating cohorts. At least 1 control was matched to each case on age, date of blood collection (1974-2006), sex, and race/ethnicity (n = 6,714). Covariate data were obtained from each cohort in a standardized manner. The majority of the serum or plasma samples were assayed in a central laboratory using a direct, competitive chemiluminescence immunoassay on the DiaSorin LIAISON platform (DiaSorin, Inc., Stillwater, Minnesota). Masked quality control samples included serum standards from the US National Institute of Standards and Technology. Conditional logistic regression analyses were conducted using clinically defined cutpoints, with 50-<75 nmol/L as the reference category. Meta-analyses were also conducted using inverse-variance weights in random-effects models. This consortium approach permits estimation of the association between 25(OH)D and several rarer cancers with high accuracy and precision across a wide range of 25(OH)D concentrations.

23 Article Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of pancreatic cancer: Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers. 2010

Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Jacobs, Eric J / Arslan, Alan A / Qi, Dai / Patel, Alpa V / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Weinstein, Stephanie J / McCullough, Marjorie L / Purdue, Mark P / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Snyder, Kirk / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wilkins, Lynn R / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Cai, Qiuyin / Harvey, Chinonye / Hayes, Richard / Clipp, Sandra / Horst, Ronald L / Irish, Lonn / Koenig, Karen / Le Marchand, Loic / Kolonel, Laurence N. ·National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20852, USA. ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #20562185.

ABSTRACT: Results from epidemiologic studies examining pancreatic cancer risk and vitamin D intake or 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations (the best indicator of vitamin D derived from diet and sun) have been inconsistent. Therefore, the authors conducted a pooled nested case-control study of participants from 8 cohorts within the Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers (VDPP) (1974-2006) to evaluate whether prediagnostic circulating 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with the development of pancreatic cancer. In total, 952 incident pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases occurred among participants (median follow-up, 6.5 years). Controls (n = 1,333) were matched to each case by cohort, age, sex, race/ethnicity, date of blood draw, and follow-up time. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to calculate smoking-, body mass index-, and diabetes-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for pancreatic cancer. Clinically relevant 25(OH)D cutpoints were compared with a referent category of 50-<75 nmol/L. No significant associations were observed for participants with lower 25(OH)D status. However, a high 25(OH)D concentration (> or =100 nmol/L) was associated with a statistically significant 2-fold increase in pancreatic cancer risk overall (odds ratio = 2.12, 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.64). Given this result, recommendations to increase vitamin D concentrations in healthy persons for the prevention of cancer should be carefully considered.

24 Article Anthropometric measures, body mass index, and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan). 2010

Arslan, Alan A / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Kooperberg, Charles / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Steplowski, Emily / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Fuchs, Charles S / Gross, Myron D / Jacobs, Eric J / Lacroix, Andrea Z / Petersen, Gloria M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Amundadottir, Laufey / Bamlet, William R / Barricarte, Aurelio / Bingham, Sheila A / Boeing, Heiner / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Chanock, Stephen J / Clipp, Sandra / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hankinson, Susan E / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Kraft, Peter / Lynch, Shannon M / Manjer, Jonas / Manson, Joann E / McTiernan, Anne / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Michaud, Dominique S / Palli, Domenico / Rohan, Thomas E / Slimani, Nadia / Thomas, Gilles / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Patel, Alpa V / Anonymous4971513. ·Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Ave, TH-528, New York, NY 10016, USA. alan.arslan@nyumc.org ·Arch Intern Med · Pubmed #20458087.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Obesity has been proposed as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Pooled data were analyzed from the National Cancer Institute Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) to study the association between prediagnostic anthropometric measures and risk of pancreatic cancer. PanScan applied a nested case-control study design and included 2170 cases and 2209 control subjects. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression for cohort-specific quartiles of body mass index (BMI [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared]), weight, height, waist circumference, and waist to hip ratio as well as conventional BMI categories (underweight, <18.5; normal weight, 18.5-24.9; overweight, 25.0-29.9; obese, 30.0-34.9; and severely obese, > or = 35.0). Models were adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: In all of the participants, a positive association between increasing BMI and risk of pancreatic cancer was observed (adjusted OR for the highest vs lowest BMI quartile, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.12-1.58; P(trend) < .001). In men, the adjusted OR for pancreatic cancer for the highest vs lowest quartile of BMI was 1.33 (95% CI, 1.04-1.69; P(trend) < .03), and in women it was 1.34 (95% CI, 1.05-1.70; P(trend) = .01). Increased waist to hip ratio was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer in women (adjusted OR for the highest vs lowest quartile, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.31-2.69; P(trend) = .003) but less so in men. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide strong support for a positive association between BMI and pancreatic cancer risk. In addition, centralized fat distribution may increase pancreatic cancer risk, especially in women.

25 Article Alcohol intake and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium (PanScan). 2010

Michaud, Dominique S / Vrieling, Alina / Jiao, Li / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Steplowski, Emily / Lynch, Shannon M / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Arslan, Alan A / Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H / Fuchs, Charles S / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / Lacroix, Andrea / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Allen, Naomi / Ammundadottir, Laufey / Bergmann, Manuela M / Boffetta, Paolo / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chanock, Stephen J / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Clipp, Sandra / Freiberg, Matthew S / Michael Gaziano, J / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hankinson, Susan / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Allan Hubbell, F / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin / Kooperberg, Charles / Kraft, Peter / Manjer, Jonas / Navarro, Carmen / Peeters, Petra H M / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Stevens, Victoria / Thomas, Gilles / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Tumino, Rosario / Vineis, Paolo / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wallace, Robert / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College London, London, UK. d.michaud@imperial.ac.uk ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #20373013.

ABSTRACT: The literature has consistently reported no association between low to moderate alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer; however, a few studies have shown that high levels of intake may increase risk. Most single studies have limited power to detect associations even in the highest alcohol intake categories or to examine associations by alcohol type. We analyzed these associations using 1,530 pancreatic cancer cases and 1,530 controls from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) nested case-control study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. We observed no significant overall association between total alcohol (ethanol) intake and pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 0.86-2.23, for 60 or more g/day vs. >0 to <5 g/day). A statistically significant increase in risk was observed among men consuming 45 or more grams of alcohol from liquor per day (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.02-4.87, compared to 0 g/day of alcohol from liquor, P-trend = 0.12), but not among women (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.63-2.87, for 30 or more g/day of alcohol from liquor, compared to none). No associations were noted for wine or beer intake. Overall, no significant increase in risk was observed, but a small effect among heavy drinkers cannot be ruled out.

Next