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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Marc Shapiro
Based on 3 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Marc Shapiro wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Potentially Curable Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update. 2017

Khorana, Alok A / Mangu, Pamela B / Berlin, Jordan / Engebretson, Anitra / Hong, Theodore S / Maitra, Anirban / Mohile, Supriya G / Mumber, Matthew / Schulick, Richard / Shapiro, Marc / Urba, Susan / Zeh, Herbert J / Katz, Matthew H G. ·Alok A. Khorana and Marc Shapiro, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH · Pamela B. Mangu, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA · Jordan Berlin, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN · Anitra Engebretson, Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, Manhattan Beach, CA · Theodore S. Hong, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA · Anirban Maitra and Matthew H.G. Katz, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX · Supriya G. Mohile, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY · Matthew Mumber, Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA · Richard Schulick, University of Colorado at Denver, Denver, CO · Susan Urba, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI · and Herbert J. Zeh, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #28398845.

ABSTRACT: Purpose To update the Potentially Curable Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published on May 31, 2016. The October 2016 update focuses solely on new evidence that pertains to clinical question 4 of the guideline: What is the appropriate adjuvant regimen for patients with pancreatic cancer who have undergone an R0 or R1 resection of their primary tumor? Methods The recently published results of a randomized phase III study prompted an update of this guideline. The high quality of the reported evidence and the potential for its clinical impact prompted the Expert Panel to revise one of the guideline recommendations. Results The ESPAC-4 study, a multicenter, international, open-label randomized controlled phase III trial of adjuvant combination chemotherapy compared gemcitabine and capecitabine with gemcitabine monotherapy in 730 evaluable patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Median overall survival was improved in the doublet arm to 28.0 months (95% CI, 23.5 to 31.5 months) versus 25.5 months (95% CI, 22.7 to 27.9 months) for gemcitabine alone (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.98; P = .032). Grade 3 and 4 adverse events were similar in both arms, although higher rates of hand-foot syndrome and diarrhea occurred in patients randomly assigned to the doublet arm. Recommendations All patients with resected pancreatic cancer who did not receive preoperative therapy should be offered 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy in the absence of medical or surgical contraindications. The doublet regimen of gemcitabine and capecitabine is preferred in the absence of concerns for toxicity or tolerance; alternatively, monotherapy with gemcitabine or fluorouracil plus folinic acid can be offered. Adjuvant treatment should be initiated within 8 weeks of surgical resection, assuming complete recovery. The remaining recommendations from the original 2016 ASCO guideline are unchanged.

2 Article Potentially Curable Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline. 2016

Khorana, Alok A / Mangu, Pamela B / Berlin, Jordan / Engebretson, Anitra / Hong, Theodore S / Maitra, Anirban / Mohile, Supriya G / Mumber, Matthew / Schulick, Richard / Shapiro, Marc / Urba, Susan / Zeh, Herbert J / Katz, Matthew H G. ·Alok A. Khorana and Marc Shapiro, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH · Pamela B. Mangu, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA · Jordan Berlin, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN · Anitra Engebretson, Patient Representative, Portland, OR · Theodore S. Hong, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA · Anirban Maitra and Matthew H.G. Katz, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX · Supriya G. Mohile, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY · Matthew Mumber, Harbin Clinic, Rome, GA · Richard Schulick, University of Colorado at Denver, Denver, CO · Susan Urba, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI · and Herbert J. Zeh, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #27247221.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To provide evidence-based recommendations to oncologists and others on potentially curative therapy for patients with localized pancreatic cancer. METHODS: ASCO convened a panel of medical oncology, radiation oncology, surgical oncology, palliative care, and advocacy experts and conducted a systematic review of literature from January 2002 to June 2015. Outcomes included overall survival, disease-free survival, progression-free survival, and adverse events. RESULTS: Nine randomized controlled trials met the systematic review criteria. RECOMMENDATIONS: A multiphase computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis or magnetic resonance imaging should be performed for all patients to assess the anatomic relationships of the primary tumor and for the presence of intra-abdominal metastases. Baseline performance status, comorbidity profile, and goals of care should be evaluated and established. Primary surgical resection is recommended for all patients who have no metastases, appropriate performance and comorbidity profiles, and no radiographic interface between primary tumor and mesenteric vasculature. Preoperative therapy is recommended for patients who meet specific characteristics. All patients with resected pancreatic cancer who did not receive preoperative therapy should be offered 6 months of adjuvant chemotherapy in the absence of contraindications. Adjuvant chemoradiation may be offered to patients who did not receive preoperative therapy with microscopically positive margins (R1) after resection and/or who had node-positive disease after completion of 4 to 6 months of systemic adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients should have a full assessment of symptoms, psychological status, and social supports and should receive palliative care early. Patients who have completed treatment and have no evidence of disease should be monitored. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/guidelines/PCPC and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki.

3 Article Predicting early mortality in resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma: A cohort study. 2015

Sohal, Davendra P S / Shrotriya, Shiva / Glass, Kate Tullio / Pelley, Robert J / McNamara, Michael J / Estfan, Bassam / Shapiro, Marc / Wey, Jane / Chalikonda, Sricharan / Morris-Stiff, Gareth / Walsh, R Matthew / Khorana, Alok A. ·Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Department of General Surgery, Digestive Disease Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. ·Cancer · Pubmed #25676016.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Survival after surgical resection for pancreatic cancer remains poor. A subgroup of patients die early (<6 months), and understanding factors associated with early mortality may help to identify high-risk patients. The Khorana score has been shown to be associated with early mortality for patients with solid tumors. In the current study, the authors evaluated the role of this score and other prognostic variables in this setting. METHODS: The current study was a cohort study of patients who underwent surgical resection for pancreatic cancer from January 2006 through June 2013. Baseline (diagnosis ±30 days) parameters were used to define patients as high risk (Khorana score ≥3). Statistically significant univariable associations and a priori prognostic variables were tested in multivariable models; adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were calculated. RESULTS: The study population comprised 334 patients. The median age was 67 years, 50% of the study population was female, and 86% of the patients were white. The pancreatic head was the primary tumor site for 73% of patients; 67% of tumors were T3 and 63% were N1. The median Khorana score was 2; 152 patients (47%) were determined to be high risk. Adjunctive treatment included chemotherapy (70%) and radiotherapy (40%). The postoperative (30-day) mortality rate was 0.9%. The 6-month mortality rate for the entire cohort was 9.4%, with significantly higher rates observed for high-risk patients (13.4% vs 5.6%; P = .02). On multivariable analyses (examining a total of 326 patients), the Khorana score (HR for high risk, 2.31; P = .039) and elevated blood urea nitrogen (HR, 4.34; P<.001) were associated with early mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Patients at high risk of early mortality after surgical resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma can be identified using simple baseline clinical and laboratory parameters. Future studies should address preoperative interventions in these patients at high risk of early mortality.