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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Barbara Seidler
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Barbara Seidler wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Homoharringtonine could induce quick protein synthesis of PSMD11 through activating MEK1/ERK1/2 signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer cells. 2018

Wang, Lele / Zhao, Linlin / Wei, Guo / Saur, Dieter / Seidler, Barbara / Wang, Junyan / Wang, Chuanxin / Qi, Tonggang. ·Central Research Laboratory, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, China. · Department of Dermatology, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, China. · The II. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Universität München, München, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine, Dezhou People's Hospital, Dezhou, China. · The Third People's Hospital of Tibet, Central Laboratory, Lhasa, China. ·J Cell Biochem · Pubmed #29665121.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most devastating disease with the 5-year survival rate less than 6%. In this study, we investigated if inhibiting protein synthesis directly with homoharringtonine (HHT) could induce acute apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells through quick depletion of multiple short-lived critical members of the central proteome, example, PSMD11(26S proteasome non-ATPase regulatory subunit 11). It was shown that although HHT could inhibit proliferation and growth of MiaPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, only part of pancreatic cancer cells could be induced to die through acute apoptosis. Mechanistic studies showed that HHT could induce quick protein synthesis of PSMD11 through activating MEK1/ERK1/2 signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer cells. Inhibiting MEK1/ERK1/2 pathway with sorafenib could improve the cytotoxity of HHT in vitro and in a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic cancer. These results suggest that quick induction of PSMD11 or other acute apoptosis inhibitors through activation of the MEK1/ERK1/2 signaling pathway may be one of the important surviving mechanism which can help pancreatic cancer cells avoid acute apoptosis, it may have significant implications for the targeted therapy of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

2 Article Evolutionary routes and KRAS dosage define pancreatic cancer phenotypes. 2018

Mueller, Sebastian / Engleitner, Thomas / Maresch, Roman / Zukowska, Magdalena / Lange, Sebastian / Kaltenbacher, Thorsten / Konukiewitz, Björn / Öllinger, Rupert / Zwiebel, Maximilian / Strong, Alex / Yen, Hsi-Yu / Banerjee, Ruby / Louzada, Sandra / Fu, Beiyuan / Seidler, Barbara / Götzfried, Juliana / Schuck, Kathleen / Hassan, Zonera / Arbeiter, Andreas / Schönhuber, Nina / Klein, Sabine / Veltkamp, Christian / Friedrich, Mathias / Rad, Lena / Barenboim, Maxim / Ziegenhain, Christoph / Hess, Julia / Dovey, Oliver M / Eser, Stefan / Parekh, Swati / Constantino-Casas, Fernando / de la Rosa, Jorge / Sierra, Marta I / Fraga, Mario / Mayerle, Julia / Klöppel, Günter / Cadiñanos, Juan / Liu, Pentao / Vassiliou, George / Weichert, Wilko / Steiger, Katja / Enard, Wolfgang / Schmid, Roland M / Yang, Fengtang / Unger, Kristian / Schneider, Günter / Varela, Ignacio / Bradley, Allan / Saur, Dieter / Rad, Roland. ·Center for Translational Cancer Research (TranslaTUM), Technische Universität München, 81675 Munich, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 81675 Munich, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Technische Universität München, 81675 Munich, Germany. · The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK. · Comparative Experimental Pathology, Technische Universität München, 81675 Munich, Germany. · Anthropology & Human Genomics, Department of Biology II, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität, 82152 Martinsried, Germany. · Helmholtz Zentrum München, Research Unit Radiation Cytogenetics, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany. · Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0ES, UK. · Instituto de Medicina Oncológica y Molecular de Asturias (IMOMA), 33193 Oviedo, Spain. · Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Medicina, Instituto Universitario de Oncología (IUOPA), Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo, Spain. · Institute of Oncology of Asturias (IUOPA), HUCA, Universidad de Oviedo, 33011 Oviedo, Spain. · Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Research Center (CINN-CSIC), Universidad de Oviedo, 33940 El Entrego, Spain. · Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik II, Klinikum der LMU München-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich, Germany. · Instituto de Biomedicina y Biotecnología de Cantabria (UC-CSIC), 39012 Santander, Spain. ·Nature · Pubmed #29364867.

ABSTRACT: The poor correlation of mutational landscapes with phenotypes limits our understanding of the pathogenesis and metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here we show that oncogenic dosage-variation has a critical role in PDAC biology and phenotypic diversification. We find an increase in gene dosage of mutant KRAS in human PDAC precursors, which drives both early tumorigenesis and metastasis and thus rationalizes early PDAC dissemination. To overcome the limitations posed to gene dosage studies by the stromal richness of PDAC, we have developed large cell culture resources of metastatic mouse PDAC. Integration of cell culture genomes, transcriptomes and tumour phenotypes with functional studies and human data reveals additional widespread effects of oncogenic dosage variation on cell morphology and plasticity, histopathology and clinical outcome, with the highest Kras

3 Article A conditional piggyBac transposition system for genetic screening in mice identifies oncogenic networks in pancreatic cancer. 2015

Rad, Roland / Rad, Lena / Wang, Wei / Strong, Alexander / Ponstingl, Hannes / Bronner, Iraad F / Mayho, Matthew / Steiger, Katja / Weber, Julia / Hieber, Maren / Veltkamp, Christian / Eser, Stefan / Geumann, Ulf / Öllinger, Rupert / Zukowska, Magdalena / Barenboim, Maxim / Maresch, Roman / Cadiñanos, Juan / Friedrich, Mathias / Varela, Ignacio / Constantino-Casas, Fernando / Sarver, Aaron / Ten Hoeve, Jelle / Prosser, Haydn / Seidler, Barbara / Bauer, Judith / Heikenwälder, Mathias / Metzakopian, Emmanouil / Krug, Anne / Ehmer, Ursula / Schneider, Günter / Knösel, Thomas / Rümmele, Petra / Aust, Daniela / Grützmann, Robert / Pilarsky, Christian / Ning, Zemin / Wessels, Lodewyk / Schmid, Roland M / Quail, Michael A / Vassiliou, George / Esposito, Irene / Liu, Pentao / Saur, Dieter / Bradley, Allan. ·1] Department of Medicine II, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, München, Germany. [2] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [3] The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, UK. · The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, UK. · Department of Pathology, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, München, Germany. · 1] Department of Medicine II, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, München, Germany. [2] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, München, Germany. · Instituto de Medicina Oncológica y Molecular de Asturias (IMOMA), Oviedo, Spain. · Instituto de Biomedicina y Biotecnología de Cantabria (UC-CSIC-SODERCAN), Santander, Spain. · Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Bioinformatics and Statistics, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Institute of Virology, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Ludwig Maximilians Universität München, München, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Universität Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Medizinische Universität Insbruck, Insbruck, Austria. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #25485836.

ABSTRACT: Here we describe a conditional piggyBac transposition system in mice and report the discovery of large sets of new cancer genes through a pancreatic insertional mutagenesis screen. We identify Foxp1 as an oncogenic transcription factor that drives pancreatic cancer invasion and spread in a mouse model and correlates with lymph node metastasis in human patients with pancreatic cancer. The propensity of piggyBac for open chromatin also enabled genome-wide screening for cancer-relevant noncoding DNA, which pinpointed a Cdkn2a cis-regulatory region. Histologically, we observed different tumor subentities and discovered associated genetic events, including Fign insertions in hepatoid pancreatic cancer. Our studies demonstrate the power of genetic screening to discover cancer drivers that are difficult to identify by other approaches to cancer genome analysis, such as downstream targets of commonly mutated human cancer genes. These piggyBac resources are universally applicable in any tissue context and provide unique experimental access to the genetic complexity of cancer.

4 Article A next-generation dual-recombinase system for time- and host-specific targeting of pancreatic cancer. 2014

Schönhuber, Nina / Seidler, Barbara / Schuck, Kathleen / Veltkamp, Christian / Schachtler, Christina / Zukowska, Magdalena / Eser, Stefan / Feyerabend, Thorsten B / Paul, Mariel C / Eser, Philipp / Klein, Sabine / Lowy, Andrew M / Banerjee, Ruby / Yang, Fangtang / Lee, Chang-Lung / Moding, Everett J / Kirsch, David G / Scheideler, Angelika / Alessi, Dario R / Varela, Ignacio / Bradley, Allan / Kind, Alexander / Schnieke, Angelika E / Rodewald, Hans-Reimer / Rad, Roland / Schmid, Roland M / Schneider, Günter / Saur, Dieter. ·Department of Internal Medicine II, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, München, Germany. · German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division for Cellular Immunology, Heidelberg, Germany. · Gene Center and Department of Biochemistry, Center for Integrated Protein Science CIPSM, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, München, Germany. · Moores Cancer Center, Division of Surgical Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. · Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · Helmholtz Zentrum München, Research Unit Comparative Medicine, Neuherberg, Germany. · MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK. · Instituto de Biomedicina y Biotecnología de Cantabria (CSIC-UC-Sodercan), Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander, Spain. · Livestock Biotechnology, Technische Universität München, Freising, Germany. · German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. ·Nat Med · Pubmed #25326799.

ABSTRACT: Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) have dramatically improved our understanding of tumor evolution and therapeutic resistance. However, sequential genetic manipulation of gene expression and targeting of the host is almost impossible using conventional Cre-loxP-based models. We have developed an inducible dual-recombinase system by combining flippase-FRT (Flp-FRT) and Cre-loxP recombination technologies to improve GEMMs of pancreatic cancer. This enables investigation of multistep carcinogenesis, genetic manipulation of tumor subpopulations (such as cancer stem cells), selective targeting of the tumor microenvironment and genetic validation of therapeutic targets in autochthonous tumors on a genome-wide scale. As a proof of concept, we performed tumor cell-autonomous and nonautonomous targeting, recapitulated hallmarks of human multistep carcinogenesis, validated genetic therapy by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase inactivation as well as cancer cell depletion and show that mast cells in the tumor microenvironment, which had been thought to be key oncogenic players, are dispensable for tumor formation.

5 Article Efemp1 and p27(Kip1) modulate responsiveness of pancreatic cancer cells towards a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor in preclinical models. 2013

Diersch, Sandra / Wenzel, Patrick / Szameitat, Melanie / Eser, Philipp / Paul, Mariel C / Seidler, Barbara / Eser, Stefan / Messer, Marlena / Reichert, Maximilian / Pagel, Philipp / Esposito, Irene / Schmid, Roland M / Saur, Dieter / Schneider, Günter. ·II. Medizinische Klinik, Technische Universität München, München, Germany. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #23470560.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a dismal disease with a poor prognosis and targeted therapies have failed in the clinic so far. Several evidences point to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-mTOR pathway as a promising signaling node for targeted therapeutic intervention. Markers, which predict responsiveness of PDAC cells towards PI3K inhibitors are unknown. However, such markers are needed and critical to better stratify patients in clinical trials. We used a large murine Kras(G12D)- and PI3K (p110α(H1047R))-driven PDAC cell line platform to unbiased define modulators of responsiveness towards the dual PI3K-mTOR inhibitor Bez235. In contrast to other tumor models, we show that Kras(G12D)- and PI3K (p110α(H1047R))-driven PDAC cell lines are equally sensitive towards Bez235. In an unbiased approach we found that the extracellular matrix protein Efemp1 controls sensitivity of murine PDAC cells towards Bez235. We show that Efemp1 expression is connected to the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(Kip1). In a murine Kras(G12D)-driven PDAC model, p27(Kip1) haploinsufficiency accelerates cancer development in vivo. Furthermore, p27(Kip1) controls Bez235 sensitivity in a gene dose-dependent fashion in murine PDAC cells and lowering of p27(Kip1) decreases Bez235 responsiveness in murine PDAC models. Together, we define the Efemp1-p27(Kip1) axis as a potential marker module of PDAC cell sensitivity towards dual PI3K-mTOR inhibitors, which might help to better stratify patients in clinical trials.

6 Article Selective requirement of PI3K/PDK1 signaling for Kras oncogene-driven pancreatic cell plasticity and cancer. 2013

Eser, Stefan / Reiff, Nina / Messer, Marlena / Seidler, Barbara / Gottschalk, Kathleen / Dobler, Melanie / Hieber, Maren / Arbeiter, Andreas / Klein, Sabine / Kong, Bo / Michalski, Christoph W / Schlitter, Anna Melissa / Esposito, Irene / Kind, Alexander J / Rad, Lena / Schnieke, Angelika E / Baccarini, Manuela / Alessi, Dario R / Rad, Roland / Schmid, Roland M / Schneider, Günter / Saur, Dieter. ·Department of Internal Medicine 2, Technische Universität München, Ismaningerstr. 22, 81675 München, Germany. ·Cancer Cell · Pubmed #23453624.

ABSTRACT: Oncogenic Kras activates a plethora of signaling pathways, but our understanding of critical Ras effectors is still very limited. We show that cell-autonomous phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1), but not Craf, are key effectors of oncogenic Kras in the pancreas, mediating cell plasticity, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) formation. This contrasts with Kras-driven non-small cell lung cancer, where signaling via Craf, but not PDK1, is an essential tumor-initiating event. These in vivo genetic studies together with pharmacologic treatment studies in models of human ADM and PDAC demonstrate tissue-specific differences of oncogenic Kras signaling and define PI3K/PDK1 as a suitable target for therapeutic intervention specifically in PDAC.

7 Article In vivo diagnosis of murine pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and early-stage pancreatic cancer by molecular imaging. 2011

Eser, Stefan / Messer, Marlena / Eser, Philipp / von Werder, Alexander / Seidler, Barbara / Bajbouj, Monther / Vogelmann, Roger / Meining, Alexander / von Burstin, Johannes / Algül, Hana / Pagel, Philipp / Schnieke, Angelika E / Esposito, Irene / Schmid, Roland M / Schneider, Günter / Saur, Dieter. ·II Medizinische Klinik, Technische Universität München, 81675 Munich, Germany. ·Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A · Pubmed #21628592.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a fatal disease with poor patient outcome often resulting from late diagnosis in advanced stages. To date methods to diagnose early-stage PDAC are limited and in vivo detection of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), a preinvasive precursor of PDAC, is impossible. Using a cathepsin-activatable near-infrared probe in combination with flexible confocal fluorescence lasermicroscopy (CFL) in a genetically defined mouse model of PDAC we were able to detect and grade murine PanIN lesions in real time in vivo. Our diagnostic approach is highly sensitive and specific and proved superior to clinically established fluorescein-enhanced imaging. Translation of this endoscopic technique into the clinic should tremendously improve detection of pancreatic neoplasia, thus reforming management of patients at risk for PDAC.