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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Richard D. Schulick
Based on 85 articles published since 2009
(Why 85 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Richard D. Schulick wrote the following 85 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4
1 Review Screening of Patients at Risk for Familial Pancreatic Cancer: What Is Beneficial? 2018

Torphy, Robert J / Schulick, Richard D. ·Department of Surgery, University of Colorado, 12631 East 17th Avenue, C-302, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Colorado, 12631 East 17th Avenue, C-302, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address: richard.schulick@ucdenver.edu. ·Surg Clin North Am · Pubmed #29191275.

ABSTRACT: Family history is a significant risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer and this hereditary risk can be secondary to familial cancer predisposition syndromes, hereditary pancreatitis, or familial pancreatic cancer. Certain high-risk individuals are recommended to undergo screening for pancreatic cancer with endoscopic ultrasound or MRI/magnetic resonance retrograde cholangiopancreatography because of the potential to identify and curatively resect precursor lesions. The management of suspicious lesions identified on screening high-risk individuals is also discussed.

2 Review Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is associated with significantly less overall morbidity compared to the open technique: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2012

Venkat, Raghunandan / Edil, Barish H / Schulick, Richard D / Lidor, Anne O / Makary, Martin A / Wolfgang, Christopher L. ·Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #22511003.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To compare laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) versus open distal pancreatectomy (ODP) by using meta-analytical techniques. BACKGROUND: LDP is increasingly performed as an alternative approach for distal pancreatectomy in selected patients. Multiple studies have tried to assess the safety and efficacy of LDP compared with ODP. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed to identify studies comparing LDP and ODP. Intraoperative outcomes, postoperative recovery, oncologic safety, and postoperative complications were evaluated. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model. RESULTS: Eighteen studies matched the selection criteria, including 1814 patients (43% laparoscopic, 57% open). LDP had lower blood loss by 355 mL (P < 0.001) and hospital length of stay by 4.0 days (P < 0.001). Overall complications were significantly lower in the laparoscopic group (33.9% vs 44.2%; odds ratio [OR] = 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57-0.95), as was surgical site infection (2.9% vs 8.1%; OR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.24-0.82). There was no difference in operative time, margin positivity, incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula, and mortality. CONCLUSIONS: LDP has lower blood loss and reduced length of hospital stay. There was a lower risk of overall postoperative complications and wound infection, without a substantial increase in the operative time. Although a thorough evaluation of oncological outcomes was not possible, the rate of margin positivity was comparable to the open technique. The improved complication profile of LDP, taken together with the lack of compromise of margin status, suggests that this technique is a reasonable approach in selected cancer patients.

3 Review Pancreatic surgery for the radiologist, 2011: an illustrated review of classic and newer surgical techniques for pancreatic tumor resection. 2011

Wolfgang, Christopher L / Corl, Frank / Johnson, Pamela T / Edil, Barish H / Horton, Karen M / Schulick, Richard D / Fishman, Elliot K. ·Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. ·AJR Am J Roentgenol · Pubmed #22109288.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Pancreatic surgery has evolved considerably since the earliest described pancreatectomies were performed in the late 1800s. Emerging surgical techniques for pancreatic cancer have modified what was traditionally deemed unresectable disease. This review summarizes the main type of pancreatic resections used for tumor removal on the basis of location and biologic behavior. CONCLUSION: CT interpretation should incorporate an understanding of current surgical techniques to provide surgeons with the information necessary for patient selection and preoperative planning.

4 Review Cystic precursors to invasive pancreatic cancer. 2011

Matthaei, Hanno / Schulick, Richard D / Hruban, Ralph H / Maitra, Anirban. ·The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1550 Orleans Street, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA. ·Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #21383670.

ABSTRACT: Improvements in the sensitivity and quality of cross-sectional imaging have led to increasing numbers of patients being diagnosed with cystic lesions of the pancreas. In parallel, clinical, radiological, pathological and molecular studies have improved the systems for classifying these cysts. Patients with asymptomatic serous cystic neoplasms can be managed conservatively with regular monitoring; however, the clinical management of patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms is far more challenging, as it is difficult to determine whether these lesions will progress to malignancy. Fortunately, prospective studies have helped to establish that proposed clinical and radiological criteria (the Sendai guidelines) can be used to guide the care of patients with cystic lesions of the pancreas. Despite this progress in imaging and clinical guidelines, sensitive and specific tests have not yet been developed that can reliably predict the histology and biological properties of a cystic lesion. Such biomarkers are urgently needed, as noninvasive precursors of pancreatic cancer are curable, while the vast majority of invasive pancreatic adenocarcinomas are not.

5 Review Immuno- and gene-therapeutic strategies targeted against cancer (mainly focusing on pancreatic cancer). 2010

Yoshimura, Kiyoshi / Olino, Kelly / Edil, Barish H / Schulick, Richard D / Oka, Masaaki. ·Department of Surgery II, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi, Japan. ·Surg Today · Pubmed #20425541.

ABSTRACT: Current treatment modalities of surgical resection and chemotherapy against cancers have improved survival. However, mortality from tumor recurrence remains high. Immunotherapy and gene therapy are potential additions to the treatment arsenal in the care of cancer patients. These novel therapeutic approaches need further investigation in in vitro and in vivo models as they are developed for potential use in humans. Here we reviewed immunotherapies and gene therapies that included clinical trials against cancers (mainly focusing on pancreatic cancer) suggesting the strong possibility of using these novel approaches.

6 Review Stents, glue, etc.: is anything proven to help prevent pancreatic leaks/fistulae? 2009

Schulick, Richard D / Yoshimura, Kiyoshi. ·Johns Hopkins University, 600 N Wolfe St., Blalock 685, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. rschulick@jhmi.edu ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #19399562.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Clinical Trial Phase 2 study of erlotinib combined with adjuvant chemoradiation and chemotherapy in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer. 2013

Herman, Joseph M / Fan, Katherine Y / Wild, Aaron T / Hacker-Prietz, Amy / Wood, Laura D / Blackford, Amanda L / Ellsworth, Susannah / Zheng, Lei / Le, Dung T / De Jesus-Acosta, Ana / Hidalgo, Manuel / Donehower, Ross C / Schulick, Richard D / Edil, Barish H / Choti, Michael A / Hruban, Ralph H / Pawlik, Timothy M / Cameron, John L / Laheru, Daniel A / Wolfgang, Christopher L. ·Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. jherma15@jhmi.edu ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #23773391.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Long-term survival rates for patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have stagnated at 20% for more than a decade, demonstrating the need to develop novel adjuvant therapies. Gemcitabine-erlotinib therapy has demonstrated a survival benefit for patients with metastatic PDAC. Here we report the first phase 2 study of erlotinib in combination with adjuvant chemoradiation and chemotherapy for resected PDAC. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Forty-eight patients with resected PDAC received adjuvant erlotinib (100 mg daily) and capecitabine (800 mg/m(2) twice daily Monday-Friday) concurrently with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), 50.4 Gy over 28 fractions followed by 4 cycles of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days) and erlotinib (100 mg daily). The primary endpoint was recurrence-free survival (RFS). RESULTS: The median follow-up time was 18.2 months (interquartile range, 13.8-27.1). Lymph nodes were positive in 85% of patients, and margins were positive in 17%. The median RFS was 15.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.4-17.9), and the median overall survival (OS) was 24.4 months (95% CI, 18.9-29.7). Multivariate analysis with adjustment for known prognostic factors showed that tumor diameter >3 cm was predictive for inferior RFS (hazard ratio, 4.01; P=.001) and OS (HR, 4.98; P=.02), and the development of dermatitis was associated with improved RFS (HR, 0.27; P=.009). During CRT and post-CRT chemotherapy, the rates of grade 3/4 toxicity were 31%/2% and 35%/8%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Erlotinib can be safely administered with adjuvant IMRT-based CRT and chemotherapy. The efficacy of this regimen appears comparable to that of existing adjuvant regimens. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0848 will ultimately determine whether erlotinib produces a survival benefit in patients with resected pancreatic cancer.

8 Article Surgical Outcomes After Pancreatic Resection of Screening-Detected Lesions in Individuals at High Risk for Developing Pancreatic Cancer. 2019

Canto, Marcia Irene / Kerdsirichairat, Tossapol / Yeo, Charles J / Hruban, Ralph H / Shin, Eun Ji / Almario, Jose Alejandro / Blackford, Amanda / Ford, Madeline / Klein, Alison P / Javed, Ammar A / Lennon, Anne Marie / Zaheer, Atif / Kamel, Ihab R / Fishman, Elliot K / Burkhart, Richard / He, Jin / Makary, Martin / Weiss, Matthew J / Schulick, Richard D / Goggins, Michael G / Wolfgang, Christopher L. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Blalock 407, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. mcanto1@jhmi.edu. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Blalock 407, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. · Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Radiology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO, USA. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #31197699.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Screening high-risk individuals (HRI) can detect potentially curable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and its precursors. We describe the outcomes of high-risk individuals (HRI) after pancreatic resection of screen-detected neoplasms. METHODS: Asymptomatic HRI enrolled in the prospective Cancer of the Pancreas Screening (CAPS) studies from 1998 to 2014 based on family history or germline mutations undergoing surveillance for at least 6 months were included. Pathologic diagnoses, hospital length of stay, incidence of diabetes mellitus, operative morbidity, need for repeat operation, and disease-specific mortality were determined. RESULTS: Among 354 HRI, 48 (13.6%) had 57 operations (distal pancreatectomy (31), Whipple (20), and total pancreatectomy (6)) for suspected pancreatic neoplasms presenting as a solid mass (22), cystic lesion(s) (25), or duct stricture (1). The median length of stay was 7 days (IQR 5-11). Nine of the 42 HRI underwent completion pancreatectomy for a new lesion after a median of 3.8 years (IQR 2.5-7.6). Postoperative complications developed in 17 HRI (35%); there were no perioperative deaths. New-onset diabetes mellitus after partial resection developed in 20% of HRI. Fourteen PDACs were diagnosed, 11 were screen-detected, 10 were resectable, and 9 had an R0 resection. Metachronous PDAC developed in remnant pancreata of 2 HRI. PDAC-related mortality was 4/10 (40%), with 90% 1-year survival and 60% 5-year survival, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Screening HRI can detect PDAC with a high resectability rate. Surgical treatment is associated with a relatively short length of stay and low readmission rate, acceptable morbidity, zero 90-day mortality, and significant long-term survival. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT2000089.

9 Article Microfluidics contrasted to thrombelastography: perplexities in defining hypercoagulability. 2018

Lawson, Peter J / Moore, Hunter B / Moore, Ernest E / Gerich, Mark E / Stettler, Gregory R / Banerjee, Anirban / Schulick, Richard D / Nydam, Trevor L. ·Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado. · Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado. Electronic address: hunter.moore@ucdenver.edu. · Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado; Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, Colorado. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado. ·J Surg Res · Pubmed #30278969.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Elevated clot strength (maximum amplitude [MA]) measured by thrombelastography (TEG) is associated with thrombotic complications. However, it remains unclear how MA translates to thrombotic risks, as this measurement is independent of time, blood flow, and clot degradation. We hypothesize that under flow conditions, increased clot strength correlates to time-dependent measurements of coagulation and resistance to fibrinolysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Surgical patients at high risk of thrombotic complications were analyzed with TEG and total thrombus-formation analysis system (T-TAS). TEG hypercoagulability was defined as an r <10.2 min, angle >59, MA >66 or LY30 <0.2% (based off of healthy control data, n = 141). The T-TAS AR and PL chips were used to measure clotting at arterial shear rates. T-TAS measurements include occlusion start time, occlusion time (OT), occlusion speed (OSp), and total clot generation (area under the curve). These measurements were correlated to TEG indices (R time, angle, MA, and LY30). Both T-TAS and TEG assays were challenged with tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) to assess clot resistance to fibrinolysis. RESULTS: Thirty subjects were analyzed, including five controls. TEG-defined hypercoagulability by MA was detected in 52% of the inflammatory bowel disease/cancer patients; 0% was detected in the controls. There were no TEG measurements that significantly correlated with T-TAS AR and PL chip. However, in the presence of t-PA, T-TAS AR determined OSp to have an inverse relationship with TEG angle (-0.477, P = 0.012) and LY30 (-0.449, P = 0.019), and a positive correlation with R time (0.441 P = 0.021). In hypercoagulability determined by TEG MA, T-TAS PL had a significantly reduced OT (4:07 versus 6:27 min, P = 0.043). In hypercoagulability defined by TEG LY30, T-TAS PL had discordant findings, with a significantly prolonged OT (6:36 versus 4:30 min, P = 0.044) and a slower OSp (10.5 versus 19.0 kPa/min, P = 0.030). CONCLUSIONS: Microfluidic coagulation assessment with T-TAS has an overall poor correlation with most TEG measurements in a predominantly hypercoagulable patient population, except in the presence of t-PA. The one anticipated finding was an elevated MA having a shorter time to platelet-mediated microfluidic occlusion, supporting the role of platelets and hypercoagulability. However, hypercoagulability defined by LY30 had opposing results in which a low LY30 was associated with a longer PL time to occlusion and slower OSp. These discordant findings warrant ongoing investigation into the relationship between clot strength and fibrinolysis under different flow conditions.

10 Article Risk of Neoplastic Progression in Individuals at High Risk for Pancreatic Cancer Undergoing Long-term Surveillance. 2018

Canto, Marcia Irene / Almario, Jose Alejandro / Schulick, Richard D / Yeo, Charles J / Klein, Alison / Blackford, Amanda / Shin, Eun Ji / Sanyal, Abanti / Yenokyan, Gayane / Lennon, Anne Marie / Kamel, Ihab R / Fishman, Elliot K / Wolfgang, Christopher / Weiss, Matthew / Hruban, Ralph H / Goggins, Michael. ·Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology), The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: mcanto@jhmi.edu. · Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology), The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado. · Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Medicine (Gastroenterology), The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · The Johns Hopkins Biostatistics Center, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Radiology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #29803839.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Screening of individuals who have a high risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), because of genetic factors, frequently leads to identification of pancreatic lesions. We investigated the incidence of PDAC and risk factors for neoplastic progression in individuals at high risk for PDAC enrolled in a long-term screening study. METHODS: We analyzed data from 354 individuals at high risk for PDAC (based on genetic factors of family history), enrolled in Cancer of the Pancreas Screening cohort studies at tertiary care academic centers from 1998 through 2014 (median follow-up time, 5.6 years). All subjects were evaluated at study entry (baseline) by endoscopic ultrasonography and underwent surveillance with endoscopic ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or computed tomography. The primary endpoint was the cumulative incidence of PDAC, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3, or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with high-grade dysplasia (HGD) after baseline. We performed multivariate Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses. RESULTS: During the follow-up period, pancreatic lesions with worrisome features (solid mass, multiple cysts, cyst size > 3 cm, thickened/enhancing walls, mural nodule, dilated main pancreatic duct > 5 mm, or abrupt change in duct caliber) or rapid cyst growth (>4 mm/year) were detected in 68 patients (19%). Overall, 24 of 354 patients (7%) had neoplastic progression (14 PDACs and 10 HGDs) over a 16-year period; the rate of progression was 1.6%/year, and 93% had detectable lesions with worrisome features before diagnosis of the PDAC or HGD. Nine of the 10 PDACs detected during routine surveillance were resectable; a significantly higher proportion of patients with resectable PDACs survived 3 years (85%) compared with the 4 subjects with symptomatic, unresectable PDACs (25%), which developed outside surveillance (log rank P < .0001). Neoplastic progression occurred at a median age of 67 years; the median time from baseline screening until PDAC diagnosis was 4.8 years (interquartile range, 1.6-6.9 years). CONCLUSIONS: In a long-term (16-year) follow-up study of individuals at high-risk for PDAC, we found most PDACs detected during surveillance (9/10) to be resectable, and 85% of these patients survived for 3 years. We identified radiologic features associated with neoplastic progression.

11 Article Utility of Viscoelastic Assays Beyond Coagulation: Can Preoperative Thrombelastography Indices Predict Tumor Histology, Nodal Disease, and Resectability in Patients Undergoing Pancreatectomy? 2018

Moore, Hunter B / Paniccia, Alessandro / Lawson, Peter J / Torphy, Robert J / Nydam, Trevor L / Moore, Ernest E / McCarter, Martin D / Schulick, Richard D / Edil, Barish H. ·Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO. Electronic address: hunter.moore@ucdenver.edu. · Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO. ·J Am Coll Surg · Pubmed #29605725.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hypercoagulability and malignancy have been linked since the 1860s. However, the impact of different neoplasms on multiple components of the coagulation system remains poorly understood. Thrombelastography (TEG) enables measurement of coagulation incorporating clotting through fibrinolysis. We hypothesize that specific TEG indices that are associated with hypercoagulability can be appreciated in patients with adenocarcinoma undergoing pancreatic resection. STUDY DESIGN: Blood samples were obtained from patients undergoing pancreatic resection before surgical incision and assayed with TEG. The 4 indices of coagulation measured by TEG included in the analysis were R time, angle, maximum amplitude, and lysis at 30 minutes. Patient tumor type, nodal disease, and mass resectability were contrasted with TEG indices. RESULTS: One hundred patients were enrolled over 18 months. The majority (63%) of patients had adenocarcinoma. Patients with adenocarcinoma had increased angle compared with other lesions (49 degrees [interquartile range {IQR} 37 to 59 degrees] vs 43 degrees [IQR 32 to 49 degrees]; p = 0.011). When excluding patients that underwent neoadjuvant therapy, patients with adenocarcinoma had shorter R times (13 minutes [IQR 9 to 16 minutes] vs 14 minutes [IQR 12 to 18 minutes]; p = 0.051), steeper angles (49 degrees [IQR 40 to 59 degrees] vs 43 degrees [IQR 32 to 49 degrees]; p = 0.010), and higher maximum amplitude (67 mm [IQR 61 to 69 mm] vs 62 mm [IQR 57 to 67 mm]; p = 0.017). Nodal disease was associated with a significantly increased angle (49 degrees [IQR 42 to 59 degrees] vs 40 degrees [IQR 32 to 50 degrees]; p = 0.002) and maximum amplitude (64 mm [IQR 61 to 69 mm] vs 62 mm [IQR 56 to 67 mm]; p = 0.017). Patients who underwent successful mass resection had longer R times (14 minutes [IQR 11 to 17 minutes] vs 10 minutes [IQR 9 to 15]; p = 0.033) and shorter angles (44 degrees [IQR 35 to 55 degrees] vs 58 degrees [IQR 45 to 66 degrees]; p = 0.025). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with adenocarcinoma undergoing pancreatic resection have multiple TEG abnormalities consistent with hypercoagulability. These TEG outputs are associated with tumor type, nodal disease, and probability of a successful resection. The use of preoperative TEG has the potential to aid surgeon and patient discussions on anticipated disease burden and prognosis before resection.

12 Article Perioperative outcomes and survival following neoadjuvant stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2018

Chapman, Brandon C / Gleisner, Ana / Rigg, Devin / Meguid, Cheryl / Goodman, Karyn / Brauer, Brian / Gajdos, Csaba / Schulick, Richard D / Edil, Barish H / McCarter, Martin D. ·Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO. · University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO. · Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO. · Division of Gasteroenterology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29448308.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To compare outcomes in patients receiving neoadjuvant stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with those receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS: We analyzed patients receiving neoadjuvant SBRT for borderline resectable (BRPC) and locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) (2012-2016). Differences in baseline characteristics, perioperative outcomes, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were compared. RESULTS: Seventy-five (82.4%) patients received SBRT and 16 (17.6%) received IMRT. There were no differences in surgical resection rates in the SBRT (n = 38, 50.7%) and IMRT (n = 11, 68.8%) groups (P = 0.188). Among resected patients, there was no difference in postoperative outcomes or pathologic outcomes including lymph node status, margin status, lymphovascular and perineural invasion, or pathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment (P > 0.05). Among all patients, median PFS and OS were 9.9 and 23.5 months in the SBRT group, respectively, and 15.3 and 21.8 months in the IMRT group, respectively (P > 0.05). Similarly, there was no difference in PFS or OS between groups when stratified by BRPC, LAPC, and surgically resected patients (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In the neoadjuvant setting, SBRT and IMRT appear to have similar rates of resection, perioperative outcomes, and survival outcomes, but additional studies with increased sample size and longer follow up are needed.

13 Article Comparison of laparoscopic to open pancreaticoduodenectomy in elderly patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2018

Chapman, Brandon C / Gajdos, Csaba / Hosokawa, Patrick / Henderson, William / Paniccia, Alessandro / Overbey, Douglas M / Gleisner, Ana / Schulick, Richard D / McCarter, Martin D / Edil, Barish H. ·Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · Adult and Child Center for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science (ACCORDS), Aurora, CO, USA. · Division of Surgical Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, 1665 Aurora Court Room 3337, MS-F-703, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. barish.edil@ucdenver.edu. ·Surg Endosc · Pubmed #29067580.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the study is to compare perioperative and survival outcomes in elderly patients undergoing laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy (LPD) to those undergoing open pancreaticoduodenectomy (OPD). METHODS: Patients aged ≥ 75 years with pancreatic adenocarcinoma undergoing LPD or OPD were identified from the NCDB (2010-2013). Baseline characteristics and perioperative outcomes were compared using a χ RESULTS: We identified 1768 patients aged ≥ 75 years who underwent LPD (n = 248, 14.0%) or OPD (n = 1520, 86.0%). The majority of patients in the LPD group had their surgery at facilities performing less than 5 LPDs per year (n = 165, 66.5%). 90-day mortality was significantly lower in the LPD compared to the OPD (7.2 vs. 12.2%, p = 0.049). The laparoscopic conversion rate was 30% (n = 74) and was associated with higher readmission rates (13.5 vs. 8.1%), 30-day mortality (8.0 vs. 3.8%), and 90-day mortality (10.4 vs. 6.0%), but these did not reach statistical significance. Median OS was significantly longer in the LPD group (19.8 vs. 15.6 months, p = 0.022). After adjusting for patient and tumor-related characteristics, there was a trend towards improved survival in the LPD group (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.69-1.03). CONCLUSION: The vast majority of the NCDB participating facilities perform less than 5 LPD cases per year, which was associated with an increased risk of perioperative mortality. Overall 90-day mortality was significantly lower in the LPD group and there was a trend towards improved OS in the LPD group compared to the OPD group after adjusting for patient and tumor-related characteristics. Studies with increased sample size and longer follow-up are needed before definitive conclusions can be made.

14 Article What We Learned From John Cameron. 2018

Schulick, Richard D. ·University of Colorado, Aurora, CO. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #29064886.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Article Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy: changing the management of ampullary neoplasms. 2018

Chapman, Brandon C / Gleisner, Ana / Ibrahim-Zada, Irada / Overbey, Douglas M / Paniccia, Alessandro / Meguid, Cheryl / Brauer, Brian / Gajdos, Csaba / McCarter, Martin D / Schulick, Richard D / Edil, Barish H. ·Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. barish.edil@ucdenver.edu. · University of Colorado School of Medicine, 1665 Aurora Court Room 3337, MS-F-703, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. barish.edil@ucdenver.edu. ·Surg Endosc · Pubmed #28779245.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to present the largest reported series comparing open pancreaticoduodenectomy (OPD) to total laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy (TLPD) in patients with ampullary neoplasms. METHODS: Patients undergoing OPD or TLPD for ampullary neoplasms from June 2012 to August 2016 were retrospectively identified. Perioperative outcomes were compared using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test, Student's t test, and Chi square analysis where appropriate. Kaplan-Meier estimates for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared between the groups using the log-rank test. RESULTS: We identified 47 patients with ampullary neoplasms (adenocarcinoma n = 36, neuroendocrine tumor n = 7, undifferentiated n = 1, adenoma n = 3) undergoing OPD (n = 25) and TLPD (n = 22). The proportion of patients being offered TLPD has progressively increased every year over 5 years: 0% (2012) to 50% (2015). There were no differences in baseline variables between the two groups. TLPD was associated with less blood loss (300 vs. 500 mL, p < 0.001) and shorter operative times (314 vs. 359 min, p = 0.024). No patient required conversion to an open procedure and there were no perioperative deaths in either group. TLPD was associated with lower rates of intra-abdominal abscess (0 vs. 16.0%, p = 0.049), but there were no differences in rates of pancreatic fistula, bile leak, delayed gastric emptying, wound infection, length of stay, and readmission (all p > 0.05). Among patients with adenocarcinoma, there was no difference in pathological features between the two groups (p > 0.05) and all patients had negative margins. At a median follow up of 25 months, there was no difference in PFS or OS between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: TLPD in patients with ampullary neoplasms results in improved perioperative outcomes while having equivalent short and long-term oncologic outcomes compared to the traditional open approach.

16 Article Blockade of CD112R and TIGIT signaling sensitizes human natural killer cell functions. 2017

Xu, Feng / Sunderland, Alexander / Zhou, Yue / Schulick, Richard D / Edil, Barish H / Zhu, Yuwen. ·Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, RC1-North Building, P18-8116, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. · Department of Hepatobiliary and Splenic Surgery, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, 110004, Liaoning, China. · Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China. · Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, RC1-North Building, P18-8116, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. yuwen.zhu@ucdenver.edu. ·Cancer Immunol Immunother · Pubmed #28623459.

ABSTRACT: Trastuzumab is the first-line drug to treat breast cancer with high Her2 expression. However, many cancers failed to respond, largely due to their resistance to NK cell-triggered antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Poliovirus receptor (PVR)-like molecules are known to be important for lymphocyte functions. We found that all PVR-like receptors are expressed on human NK cells, and only TIGIT is preferentially expressed on the CD16+ NK cell subset. Disrupting the interactions of PVR-like receptors with their ligands on cancer cells regulates NK cell activity. More importantly, TIGIT is upregulated upon NK cell activation via ADCC. Blockade of TIGIT or CD112R, separately or together, enhances trastuzumab-triggered antitumor response by human NK cells. Thus, our findings suggest that PVR-like receptors regulate NK cell functions and can be targeted for improving trastuzumab therapy for breast cancer.

17 Article Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Humphris, Jeremy L / Patch, Ann-Marie / Nones, Katia / Bailey, Peter J / Johns, Amber L / McKay, Skye / Chang, David K / Miller, David K / Pajic, Marina / Kassahn, Karin S / Quinn, Michael C J / Bruxner, Timothy J C / Christ, Angelika N / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Manning, Suzanne / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Stone, Andrew / Wilson, Peter J / Anderson, Matthew / Fink, J Lynn / Holmes, Oliver / Kazakoff, Stephen / Leonard, Conrad / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Wood, Scott / Mead, Ronald S / Xu, Qinying / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark J / Jones, Marc D / Nagrial, Adnan M / Chin, Venessa T / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Chou, Angela / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia V / Rooman, Ilse / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher W / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Jamieson, Nigel B / McKay, Colin J / Carter, C Ross / Dickson, Euan J / Graham, Janet S / Duthie, Fraser / Oien, Karin / Hair, Jane / Morton, Jennifer P / Sansom, Owen J / Grützmann, Robert / Hruban, Ralph H / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Schulick, Richard D / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Rusev, Borislav / Corbo, Vincenzo / Salvia, Roberto / Cataldo, Ivana / Tortora, Giampaolo / Tempero, Margaret A / Anonymous5740887 / Hofmann, Oliver / Eshleman, James R / Pilarsky, Christian / Scarpa, Aldo / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Gill, Anthony J / Pearson, John V / Grimmond, Sean M / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Genetic and Molecular Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Eastern Area Laboratory Services Pathology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia; Sonic Genetics, Douglass Hanly Moir Pathology, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, SydPath, St Vincent's Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Murdoch, Washington. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woollongabba, Queensland, Australia. · School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Australia and St John of God Pathology, Subiaco, Washington. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow & Clyde National Health Service, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Greater Glasgow and Clyde Bio-repository, Pathology Department, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Institute for Cancer Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · ARC-NET Center for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy; Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Medicine, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California. · Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Department of Surgery, University of Erlangen-Nueremberg, Germany. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; University of Melbourne Centre for Cancer Research, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: nic.waddell@qimrberghofer.edu.au. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. Electronic address: andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #27856273.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

18 Article Laparoscopic Spleen-Preserving Total Pancreatectomy for a Main-Duct Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm. 2017

Chapman, Brandon C / Paniccia, Alessandro / Ryan, Carrie / Schulick, Richard D / Edil, Barish H. ·Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. barish.edil@ucdenver.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #27590330.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas (M-IPMN) are potentially malignant cystic neoplasms that can degenerate into invasive malignancy in 43 % of cases.1 Although laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy and distal pancreatectomy have been previously described for the management of pancreatic neoplasms, laparoscopic total pancreatectomy is rarely described. We present a video demonstrating a laparoscopic spleen-preserving total pancreatectomy in a patient with M-IPMN. CASE PRESENTATION: A healthy 66-year-old male was diagnosed with recurrent pancreatitis. A computed tomography of the abdomen demonstrated a diffusely dilated pancreatic duct (10 mm) and a 5 mm mural nodule in the neck of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography demonstrated a 'fish mouth' appearance at the major papilla, with a villous mass (15 mm) in the pancreatic head. Biopsy was consistent with M-IPMN, and tumor markers were normal. RESULTS: A spleen-preserving laparoscopic total pancreatectomy was performed over a period of 270 min, with 150 cc of blood loss without complications. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for continuous insulin infusion. On postoperative day (POD) 1, his nasogastric tube was discontinued, transitioned to subcutaneous insulin injections, and transferred to the floor. He tolerated a diabetic diet on POD 4. His surgical drain had minimal output with no evidence of a bile leak, and was discontinued on POD 5. The patient's hospital course was uncomplicated and he was discharged home on POD 7. Pathology demonstrated IPMN with moderate dysplasia. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic total pancreatectomy can be safely performed in patients with M-IPMN. This video presentation describes the technique we used for this procedure.

19 Article A matched-cohort analysis of 192 pancreatic anaplastic carcinomas and 960 pancreatic adenocarcinomas: A 13-year North American experience using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). 2016

Paniccia, Alessandro / Hosokawa, Patrick W / Schulick, Richard D / Henderson, William / Kaplan, Jeffrey / Gajdos, Csaba. ·Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO. · University of Colorado Health Outcomes Program, Aurora, CO. · Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO. · Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO. Electronic address: csaba.gajdos@ucdenver.edu. ·Surgery · Pubmed #27085687.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma (APC) is a rare and poorly characterized disease. We sought to compare the clinical characteristics and outcomes of APC to pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS: The American National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected APC and PDAC using histologic and operative codes. APC cases were matched 1:5 with PDACs based on age, sex, pathologic tumor stage, operative margin status, lymph node positivity ratio, and use of adjuvant chemotherapy. RESULTS: After 1:5 matching, 192 APCs and 960 PDACs were analyzed. When comparing APC vs PDAC the median tumor size was 45 mm (interquartile range, 33-60) vs 30 mm (interquartile range, 23-40; P < .001), and metastatic nodal disease was present in 40.6% and 38.0% of the cases (P = .25), respectively. APC cases were distributed equally between the head and the body/tail region of the pancreas (50%), while PDAC cases were located mainly in the head of the pancreas (75%; P < .001). Although the resected APC group had a lesser survival during the first year after the diagnosis (51% vs 69%; P = .029), the overall survival was similar in the 2 groups, with 21.6% vs 17.4% alive at 5 years, respectively for APC and PDAC (P = .32). Subgroup analysis of patients with APC with (n = 18) versus those without (n = 80) osteoclastlike giant cells showed a greater 5-year survival (50% versus 15%, P < .001). CONCLUSION: Patients with resected APC tend to present with large tumors equally distributed between the head and body/tail of the pancreas. While APC is thought to have a more aggressive biology, our matched analysis showed similar overall survival compared with PDAC. The presence of osteoclastlike giant cells portends a significantly better prognosis compared with other histologic features of APCs.

20 Article Outcomes of arterial resection during pancreatectomy for tumor. 2016

Glebova, Natalia O / Hicks, Caitlin W / Tosoian, Jeffrey J / Piazza, Kristen M / Abularrage, Christopher J / Schulick, Richard D / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Black, James H. ·Section of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo; Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. · Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. · Department of Urology, The James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. · Division of GI, Tumor, and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. · Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. Electronic address: jhblack@jhmi.edu. ·J Vasc Surg · Pubmed #26610641.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Arterial resection (AR) during pancreatic tumor resection is controversial. We examined the safety and efficacy of AR during pancreatectomy. METHODS: We used a prospective institutional database that includes 6522 patients who underwent pancreatectomy from 1970 to 2014; 35 had AR. We performed a 2:1 propensity match for patients without and with AR on the basis of preoperative patient and tumor variables. We then compared operative and postoperative outcomes between matched groups. RESULTS: AR included 18 hepatic, 8 celiac, 3 splenic, 3 middle colic, 2 superior mesenteric, and 1 left renal artery. There were 20 primary, 4 vein, and 2 graft reconstructions; 11 were emergent and 24 elective. Before matching, patients with AR were younger (58 ± 2 vs 63 ± 0.2 years old; P = .05), more likely to be of black race (26% vs 9%; P = .003), to have received preoperative chemotherapy (17% vs 2%; P < .001), have a later stage and larger tumor (4 ± 0.8 vs 3 ± 0.04 cm; P = .05), more resections that included removal of all macroscopic disease, but microscopic residual tumor remained (31% vs 14%; P = .02), greater blood loss (1285 ± 276 vs 822 ± 16 mL; P = .02), and more frequent cardiac complications (11% vs 4%; P = .03) compared with patients without AR. After propensity matching, baseline patient characteristics were similar between groups. For perioperative outcomes, the groups did not differ in surgical time, blood loss, length of stay, or complications including anastomotic leaks, bleeding, cardiac, infectious complications, or liver infarct or failure (all; P = not significant). Patency was 97% at a mean follow-up of 510 ± 184 days with 1 hepatic artery AR thrombosis. Long-term outcomes were significantly different: patients with AR had a lower rate of local tumor recurrence (20% vs 47%; P = .007) but also lower 1-year (50% vs 87%; P = .002) and median survival (22 ± 18 vs 49 ± 7 months; P = .002). CONCLUSIONS: AR during pancreatectomy is safe and not associated with increased complications. Although it significantly reduces the risk of local tumor recurrence, AR is associated with worse survival compared with patients who do not undergo AR.

21 Article Predictors for Surgical Referral in Patients With Pancreatic Cystic Lesions Undergoing Endoscopic Ultrasound: Results From a Large Multicenter Cohort Study. 2016

Ge, Phillip S / Gaddam, Srinivas / Keach, Joseph W / Mullady, Daniel / Fukami, Norio / Edmundowicz, Steven A / Azar, Riad R / Shah, Raj J / Murad, Faris M / Kushnir, Vladimir M / Ghassemi, Kourosh F / Sedarat, Alireza / Watson, Rabindra R / Amateau, Stuart K / Brauer, Brian C / Yen, Roy D / Hosford, Lindsay / Hollander, Thomas / Donahue, Timothy R / Schulick, Richard D / Edil, Barish H / McCarter, Martin D / Gajdos, Csaba / Attwell, Augustin R / Muthusamy, V Raman / Early, Dayna S / Wani, Sachin. ·From the *Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, †Division of Gastroenterology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; ‡Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO; §Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA; ∥Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora; and ¶Division of Gastroenterology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, CO. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #26262589.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) plays an integral role in the evaluation of pancreatic cysts lesions (PCLs). The aim of the study was to determine predictors of surgical referral in patients with PCLs undergoing EUS. METHODS: We performed a multicenter retrospective study of patients undergoing EUS for evaluation of PCLs. Demographics, EUS characteristics, and fine-needle aspiration results were recorded. Patients were categorized into surgery or surveillance groups on the basis of post-EUS recommendations. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of surgical referral. RESULTS: 1804 patients were included. 1301 patients were recommended to undergo surveillance and 503 patients were referred for surgical evaluation, of which 360 patients underwent surgery. Multivariate analysis revealed the following 5 independent predictors of surgical referral: symptoms of weight loss on presentation (odds ratio [OR], 2.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-5.03), EUS findings of associated solid mass (OR, 7.34; 95% CI, 3.81-14.16), main duct communication (OR, 4.13; 95% CI, 1.71-9.98), multilocular macrocystic morphology (OR, 2.79; 95% CI, 1.78-4.38), and fine-needle aspiration findings of mucin on cytology (OR, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.94-4.82). CONCLUSIONS: This study identifies factors associated with surgical referral in patients with PCLs undergoing EUS. Future studies should focus on creation of risk stratification models to determine the need for surgery or enrollment in surveillance programs.

22 Article Suboptimal accuracy of carcinoembryonic antigen in differentiation of mucinous and nonmucinous pancreatic cysts: results of a large multicenter study. 2015

Gaddam, Srinivas / Ge, Phillip S / Keach, Joseph W / Mullady, Daniel / Fukami, Norio / Edmundowicz, Steven A / Azar, Riad R / Shah, Raj J / Murad, Faris M / Kushnir, Vladimir M / Watson, Rabindra R / Ghassemi, Kourosh F / Sedarat, Alireza / Komanduri, Srinadh / Jaiyeola, Diana-Marie / Brauer, Brian C / Yen, Roy D / Amateau, Stuart K / Hosford, Lindsay / Hollander, Thomas / Donahue, Timothy R / Schulick, Richard D / Edil, Barish H / McCarter, Martin / Gajdos, Csaba / Attwell, Augustin / Muthusamy, V Raman / Early, Dayna S / Wani, Sachin. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Centennial, Colorado, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Feinberg School of Medicine Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Centennial, Colorado, USA; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, Colorado, USA. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #26077458.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The exact cutoff value at which pancreatic cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level distinguishes pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) from pancreatic nonmucinous cystic neoplasms (NMCNs) is unclear. The aim of this multicenter retrospective study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of cyst fluid CEA levels in differentiating between MCNs and NMCNs. METHODS: Consecutive patients who underwent EUS with FNA at 3 tertiary care centers were identified. Patients with histologic confirmation of cyst type based on surgical specimens served as the criterion standard for this analysis. Demographic characteristics, EUS morphology, FNA fluid, and cytology results were recorded. Multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify predictors of MCNs was performed. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated for CEA levels. RESULTS: A total of 226 patients underwent surgery (mean age, 61 years, 96% white patients, 39% female patients) of whom 88% underwent Whipple's procedure or distal pancreatectomy. Based on surgical histopathology, there were 150 MCNs and 76 NMCNs cases. The median CEA level was 165 ng/mL. The area under the ROC curve for CEA levels in differentiating between MCNs and NMCNs was 0.77 (95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.84, P < .01) with a cutoff of 105 ng/mL, demonstrating a sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 63%, respectively. The cutoff value of 192 ng/mL yielded a sensitivity of 61% and a specificity of 77% and would misdiagnose 39% of MCN cases. CONCLUSIONS: Cyst fluid CEA levels have a clinically suboptimal accuracy level in differentiating MCNs from NMCNs. Future studies should focus on novel cyst fluid markers to improve risk stratification of pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

23 Article Characteristics of 10-Year Survivors of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma. 2015

Paniccia, Alessandro / Hosokawa, Patrick / Henderson, William / Schulick, Richard D / Edil, Barish H / McCarter, Martin D / Gajdos, Csaba. ·Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora. · Health Outcomes Program, University of Colorado, Aurora. ·JAMA Surg · Pubmed #26062046.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: To our knowledge, this study reports on the largest cohort of long-term survivors (LTSs) (≥10 years) following a diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PADC) and identifies the characteristics associated with LTS. OBJECTIVE: To determine patient, tumor, surgical, and sociodemographic characteristics associated with LTS. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A nationwide retrospective cohort study of patients with invasive PADC (International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition codes 8140/3, 8500/3, 8021/3, and 8035/3) was conducted using data collected in the National Cancer Database (NCDB). A multivariable logistic regression model of factors significantly associated with LTS was developed and used to generate a nomogram predicting the likelihood of surviving at least 10 years from initial diagnosis. Data collected from more than 1500 academic centers and community hospitals in the United States and Puerto Rico were assessed. Patients included were those with histologically proven PADC who underwent pancreatic surgical resection aimed at removal of the primary tumor between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2002 (n = 11,917). The initial cohort (n = 70,915) excluded noninvasive tumors or tumors with unknown histology (n = 11,696) and was limited to patients who underwent surgical resection (n = 47,302 excluded). Analysis was conducted from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2011. EXPOSURES: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Long-term survival, defined as surviving at least 10 years from initial diagnosis. RESULTS: Of the 11,081 patients with complete survival information, 431 individuals (3.9%) were LTSs. Significant predictors of LTS included (determined using odds ratio [OR]; 95% CI), in order of importance, lymph node positivity ratio (0%: 4.6; 3.4-6.4), adjuvant chemotherapy (2.4; 2.0-3.0), pathologic T stage (T1: 3.1; 1.8-5.6), patient age (50-60 years: 3.4; 1.8-6.7), tumor grade (well differentiated: 2.2; 1.5-3.0), surgical margin (negative: 1.9; 1.4-2.6), pathologic M stage (M = X: 5.6; 2.1-22.8), tumor size (<2 cm: 1.7; 1.2-2.5), educational level (>86% high school graduates: 1.7; 1.2-2.4), and insurance status according to the patient's zip code (private: 2.0; 95% CI, 0.9-5.1). The model C index was 0.768. Based on our nomogram, patients with the most favorable characteristics had an 18.1% chance of LTS. Furthermore, survival curves demonstrated that the probability of dying following initial diagnosis of PADC reached a plateau of approximately 10% per year after 7 years of survival. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Although PADC remains a deadly disease, long-term survival is possible, even beyond the 10-year mark. Our adjusted analysis identified lymph node ratio, administration of adjuvant chemotherapy, and pathologic T stage as being the top 3 variables associated with LTS of PADC. In addition, our easy-to-use nomogram may be able to identify potential LTS among patients with resected PADC.

24 Article Technical risk factors for portal vein reconstruction thrombosis in pancreatic resection. 2015

Glebova, Natalia O / Hicks, Caitlin W / Piazza, Kristen M / Abularrage, Christopher J / Cameron, Andrew M / Schulick, Richard D / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Black, James H. ·Section of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo. · Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. · Division of Transplant Surgery, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. · Division of GI, Tumor, and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. · Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. Electronic address: jhblack@jhmi.edu. ·J Vasc Surg · Pubmed #25953018.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Vascular reconstruction can facilitate pancreas tumor resection, but optimal methods of reconstruction are not well studied. We report our results for portal vein reconstruction (PVR) for pancreatic resection and determinants of postoperative patency. METHODS: We identified 173 patients with PVR in a prospective database of 6522 patients who underwent pancreatic resection at our hospital from 1970 to 2014. There were 128 patients who had >1 year of follow-up with computed tomography imaging. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors were recorded. Patients with and without postoperative PVR thrombosis were compared by univariable, multivariable, and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. RESULTS: The survival of patients was 100% at 1 month, 88% at 6 months, 66% at 1 year, and 39% on overall median follow-up of 310 days (interquartile range, 417 days). Median survival was 15.5 months (interquartile range, 25 months); 86% of resections were for cancer. Four types of PVR techniques were used: 83% of PVRs were performed by primary repair, 8.7% with interposition vein graft, 4.7% with interposition prosthetic graft, and 4.7% with patch. PVR patency was 100% at 1 day, 98% at 1 month, 91% at 6 months, and 83% at 1 year. Patients with PVR thrombosis were not significantly different from patients with patent PVR in age, survival, preoperative comorbidities, tumor characteristics, perioperative blood loss or transfusion, or postoperative complications. They were more likely to have had preoperative chemotherapy (53% vs 9%; P < .0001), radiation therapy (35% vs 2%; P < .0001), and prolonged operative time (618 ± 57 vs 424 ± 20 minutes; P = .002) and to develop postoperative ascites (76% vs 22%; P < .001). Among patients who developed ascites, 38% of those with PVR thrombosis did so in the setting of tumor recurrence at the porta detected on imaging, whereas among patients with patent PVR, 50% did so (P = .73). Patients with PVR thrombosis were more likely to have had prosthetic graft placement compared with patients with patent PVRs (18% vs 2.7%; P = .03; odds ratio [OR], 7.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-42). PVR patency overall was significantly worse for patients who had an interposition prosthetic graft reconstruction (log-rank, P = .04). On multivariable analysis, operative time (OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.01-1.02) and prosthetic graft placement (OR, 8.12; 95% CI, 1.1-74) were independent predictors of PVR thrombosis (C statistic = 0.88). CONCLUSIONS: Long operative times and use of prosthetic grafts for reconstruction are risk factors for postoperative portal vein thrombosis. Primary repair, patch, or vein interposition should be preferentially used for PVR in the setting of pancreatic resection.

25 Article Total Laparoscopic Pancreaticoduodenectomy: A Single-Institutional Experience. 2015

Paniccia, Alessandro / Schulick, Richard D / Edil, Barish H. ·Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. · Pancreas and Biliary Surgery, University of Colorado Anschutz Cancer Pavilion, Aurora, CO, USA. barish.edil@ucdenver.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #25893407.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy represents one of the most advanced abdominal surgical procedures; however, a standard approach is still lacking. We present our initial experience with total laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy (TLPD) with a video of the technique that we have developed and the clinical as well as oncologic outcomes obtained with this technique. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of all cases consecutively performed by two operators between January 2013 and December 2014 at The University of Colorado (Fig. 1). Fig. 1 Pathology of resected lesions via total laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy (N = 30) RESULTS: Thirty patients underwent TLPD; conversion to open procedure was required in two cases (6 %). Median age at diagnosis was 63.1 years [interquartile range (IQR) 53.8-70.8]. Operative characteristics and postoperative complications are summarized in Table 1. The operative time decreased from 366 minutes (IQR 320-421) in the first 15 cases to 312 min (IQR 282-372) in the second 15 cases (r = -2.7; p = 0.047). The estimated blood loss decreased from 300 mL (IQR 300-500) in the first 15 cases to 200 mL (IQR 150-375) in the second 15 cases (r = -6.3; p = 0.314). Table 1 Operative characteristics and postoperative complications Variable N = 30 Surgical margin Negative R0 30 (100 %) Number of nodes harvested Median (range) 18 (15-22) Operative time (min) Median (range) 340 (308-377) EBL (mL) Median (range) 300 (200-400) Pancreatic fistula 15 (50 %) Pancreatic fistula grade A 8 (27 %) B 5 (17 %) C 2 (7 %) Delayed gastric emptying (DGE) 10 (33 %) DGE grade A 4 (14 %) B 5 (17 %) C 1 (3 %) Bile leak 3 (10 %) Pseudoaneurysm Hepatic artery 2 (7 %) GDA 1 (3 %) Chyle leak 1 (3 %) Surgical site infection (SSI) 6 (20 %) SSI type Superficial 2 (7 %) Deep 0 Organ space 6 (20 %) LOS (days) Median (range) 11 (8-15) Readmission (30 days) 6 (20 %) Death (90 days) 0 CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy is a challenging operation, which is not performed in high volume at most centers. As a new laparoscopic pancreas program, our experience shows that oncologic outcomes are acceptable in terms of margin and lymph node harvest. There is undoubtedly a steep learning curve that complicates the initial application of TLPD; however, with the techniques displayed in this video many of the early complications can be overcome. Further study to evaluate for long-term safety is needed.

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