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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Mario Scartozzi
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Mario Scartozzi wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review New therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer. 2019

Lai, Eleonora / Puzzoni, Marco / Ziranu, Pina / Pretta, Andrea / Impera, Valentino / Mariani, Stefano / Liscia, Nicole / Soro, Paolo / Musio, Francesca / Persano, Mara / Donisi, Clelia / Tolu, Simona / Balconi, Francesca / Pireddu, Annagrazia / Demurtas, Laura / Pusceddu, Valeria / Camera, Silvia / Sclafani, Francesco / Scartozzi, Mario. ·Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: ele.lai87@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: marcopuzzoni@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: pziranu@libero.it. · Medical Oncology Unit, Sapienza University of Rome - University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: an.pretta@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, Sapienza University of Rome - University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: vola_90@live.it. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: mariani.step@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, Sapienza University of Rome - University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: nikina310788@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: paol.soro.9@outlook.it. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: francesca.musio@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: marapersano@alice.it. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: cleliadonisi@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, Sapienza University of Rome - University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: simo.tolu@tiscali.it. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: frabalconi@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, Sapienza University of Rome - University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: pireddu.annagrazia@tiscali.it. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: lau.demi81@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: valeria.pusce@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, Sapienza University of Rome - University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: silvia.camera@hotmail.it. · Gastrointestinal Unit, Jules Bordet Institute, Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: francesco.sclafani@bordet.be. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital and University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: marioscartozzi@gmail.com. ·Cancer Treat Rev · Pubmed #31739115.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is associated with poor survival. Of all newly diagnosed patients, only about 20% can benefit from a potentially curative surgical resection, the remaining 80% presenting with unresectable locally advanced (LAPC) or metastatic (MPC) disease. Currently, there are limited therapeutic options for LAPC and MPC patients. Furthermore, despite intensive research efforts to better understand the molecular bases of PDAC and the biological relevance of its tumor microenvironment, treatments still largely consist of classical cytotoxic chemotherapy agents. Several studies of genetic and epigenetic sequencing have demonstrated the existence of 4 molecular PDAC subtypes, with heterogeneous genetic characteristics and different biological behaviour: squamous, pancreatic progenitor, immunogenic and aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX). These distinct subtypes derive from alterations at multiple levels. Apart from the DNA repair pathway, however, none of these has so far been validated as a clinically relevant therapeutic target. Also, PDAC is unique from an immunological perspective and many studies have recently tried to elucidate the role of intratumoral effector T-cells, RAS oncogene, immunosuppressive leukocytes and desmoplastic reaction in maintaining the immunological homeostasis of this disease. However, there still remains much to be learned about the mechanisms whereby the pancreatic immune microenvironment promotes immune escape of cancer cells. Furthermore, while therapies targeting the stroma as well as immunotherapies hold promise for the future, these are not yet standard of care. This review aims to outline the state-of-the-art of LAPC and MPC treatment, highlighting data on the target therapies failure and current ongoing clinical trials on new promising therapeutic strategies.

2 Review Second-line chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer: Which is the best option? 2017

Aprile, Giuseppe / Negri, Francesca V / Giuliani, Francesco / De Carlo, Elisa / Melisi, Davide / Simionato, Francesca / Silvestris, Nicola / Brunetti, Oronzo / Leone, Francesco / Marino, Donatella / Santini, Daniele / Dell'Aquila, Emanuela / Zeppola, Tea / Puzzoni, Marco / Scartozzi, Mario. ·Department of Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine, Italy; Department of Oncology, San Bortolo General Hospital, ULSS8 Berica, East District, Vicenza, Italy. Electronic address: giuseppe.aprile@aulss8.veneto.it. · Medical Oncology, University Hospital, Parma, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, National Cancer Institute IRCCS "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari, Italy. · Department of Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine, Italy. · Medical Oncology, University of Verona, Italy. · Medical Oncology, Candiolo Cancer Institute, FPO, IRCCS, University of Torino (TO), Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, University Campus Bio-Medico, Roma, Italy. · Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Cagliari, Italy. ·Crit Rev Oncol Hematol · Pubmed #28602164.

ABSTRACT: Despite recent biological insight and therapeutic advances, the prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer still remains poor. For more than 15 years, gemcitabine monotherapy has been the cornerstone of first-line treatment. Recently, prospective randomized trials have shown that novel upfront combination regimens tested in prospective randomized trials have resulted in improved patients' outcome increasing the proportion of putative candidate to second-line therapy. There is no definite standard of care after disease progression. A novel formulation in which irinotecan is encapsulated into liposomal-based nanoparticles may increase the efficacy of the drug without incrementing its toxicity. NAPOLI-1 was the first randomized trial to compare nanoliposomal irinotecan and fluorouracil-leucovorin (5-FU/LV) to 5-FU/LV alone after a gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. This review focuses on the current data for the management of second-line treatment for metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma, presents the most interesting ongoing clinical trials and illustrates the biologically-driven future options beyond disease progression.

3 Review Multimodal treatment of resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2017

Silvestris, Nicola / Brunetti, Oronzo / Vasile, Enrico / Cellini, Francesco / Cataldo, Ivana / Pusceddu, Valeria / Cattaneo, Monica / Partelli, Stefano / Scartozzi, Mario / Aprile, Giuseppe / Casadei Gardini, Andrea / Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe / Valentini, Vincenzo / Scarpa, Aldo / Falconi, Massimo / Calabrese, Angela / Lorusso, Vito / Reni, Michele / Cascinu, Stefano. ·Medical Oncology Unit, Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari, Italy. Electronic address: n.silvestris@oncologico.bari.it. · Medical Oncology Unit, Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari, Italy. Electronic address: dr.oronzo.brunetti@tiscali.it. · Department of Oncology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy. Electronic address: e.vasile@ao.pisa.toscana.it. · Radiation Oncology Department, Gemelli ART, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy. Electronic address: francesco.cellini@uniroma3.it. · ARC-NET Research Centre, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: cataldo.ivana@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: oncologiamedica2reparto@gmail.com. · Department of Medical Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine, Italy. Electronic address: aprile83@gmail.com. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Centre, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 'Vita-Salute' University, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: partelli.stefano@hsr.it. · Medical Oncology Unit, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: marioscartozzi@gmail.com. · Department of Medical Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine, Italy; Department of Medical Oncology, General Hospital of Vicenza, Vicenza, Italy. Electronic address: aprile.giuseppe@aoud.sanita.fvg.it. · Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. Electronic address: casadeigardini@gmail.com. · Radiation Oncology Center, Dept. of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine - DIMES, University of Bologna, Italy. Electronic address: alessio.morganti2@unibo.it. · Radiation Oncology Department, Gemelli ART, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy. Electronic address: vincenzo.valentini@unicatt.it. · ARC-NET Research Centre, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: aldo.scarpa@univr.it. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Centre, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 'Vita-Salute' University, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: falconi.massimo@hsr.it. · Radiology Unit, Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari, Italy. Electronic address: acalabrese22@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari, Italy. Electronic address: vito.lorusso@oncologico.bari.it. · Medical Oncology Department, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: reni.michele@hsr.it. · Modena Cancer Center, Policlinico di Modena Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Italy. Electronic address: cascinu@yahoo.com. ·Crit Rev Oncol Hematol · Pubmed #28259290.

ABSTRACT: After a timing preoperative staging, treatment of resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) includes surgery and adjuvant therapies, the former representing the initial therapeutic option and the latter aiming to reduce the incidence of both distant metastases (chemotherapy) and locoregional failures (chemoradiotherapy). Herein, we provide a critical overview on the role of multimodal treatment in PDAC and on new opportunities related to current more active poli-chemotherapy regimens, targeted therapies, and the more recent immunotherapy approaches. Moreover, an analysis of pathological markers and clinical features able to help clinicians in the selection of the best therapeutic strategy will be discussed. Lastly, the role of neoadjuvant treatment of initially resectable disease will be considered mostly in patients whose malignancy shows morphological but not clinical or biological criteria of resectability. Depending on the results of these investigational studies, today a multidisciplinary approach can offer the best address therapy for these patients.

4 Clinical Trial The value of lactate dehydrogenase serum levels as a prognostic and predictive factor for advanced pancreatic cancer patients receiving sorafenib. 2015

Faloppi, Luca / Bianconi, Maristella / Giampieri, Riccardo / Sobrero, Alberto / Labianca, Roberto / Ferrari, Daris / Barni, Sandro / Aitini, Enrico / Zaniboni, Alberto / Boni, Corrado / Caprioni, Francesco / Mosconi, Stefania / Fanello, Silvia / Berardi, Rossana / Bittoni, Alessandro / Andrikou, Kalliopi / Cinquini, Michela / Torri, Valter / Scartozzi, Mario / Cascinu, Stefano / Anonymous3600843. ·Medical Oncology Unit, Università Politecnica delle Marche, AOU "Ospedali Riuniti", Ancona, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale S. Martino, Genova, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale S. Paolo, Milano, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, Treviglio Hospital, Treviglio, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, C. Poma Hospital, Mantova, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · New Drug Development Strategies Laboratory, Mario Negri Institute, Milano, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria, Cagliari, Italy. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #26397228.

ABSTRACT: Although lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) serum levels, indirect markers of angiogenesis, are associated with a worse outcome in several tumours, their prognostic value is not defined in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, high levels are associated even with a lack of efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, contributing to explain negative results in clinical trials. We assessed the role of LDH in advanced pancreatic cancer receiving sorafenib. Seventy-one of 114 patients included in the randomised phase II trial MAPS (chemotherapy plus or not sorafenib) and with available serum LDH levels, were included in this analysis. Patients were categorized according to serum LDH levels (LDH ≤ vs.> upper normal rate). A significant difference was found in progression free survival (PFS) and in overall survival (OS) between patients with LDH values under or above the cut-off (PFS: 5.2 vs. 2.7 months, p = 0.0287; OS: 10.7 vs. 5.9 months, p = 0.0021). After stratification according to LDH serum levels and sorafenib treatment, patients with low LDH serum levels treated with sorafenib showed an advantage in PFS (p = 0.05) and OS (p = 0.0012). LDH appears to be a reliable parameter to assess the prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer patients, and it may be a predictive parameter to select patients candidate to receive sorafenib.

5 Article The Italian Rare Pancreatic Exocrine Cancer Initiative. 2019

Brunetti, Oronzo / Luchini, Claudio / Argentiero, Antonella / Tommasi, Stefania / Mangia, Anita / Aprile, Giuseppe / Marchetti, Paolo / Vasile, Enrico / Casadei Gardini, Andrea / Scartozzi, Mario / Barni, Sandro / Delfanti, Sara / De Vita, Fernando / Di Costanzo, Francesco / Milella, Michele / Cella, Chiara Alessandra / Berardi, Rossana / Cataldo, Ivana / Santini, Daniele / Doglioni, Claudio / Maiello, Evaristo / Lawlor, Rita T / Mazzaferro, Vincenzo / Lonardi, Sara / Giuliante, Felice / Brandi, Giovanni / Scarpa, Aldo / Cascinu, Stefano / Silvestris, Nicola. ·1 Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II" of Bari, Bari, Italy. · 2 Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · 3 Molecular Diagnostics and Pharmacogenetics Unit, IRCCS Istituto Tumori "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari, Italy. · 4 Functional Biomorphology Laboratory, IRCCS-Istituto Tumori, Bari, Italy. · 5 Medical Oncology Unit, Hospital of Vicenza, Vicenza, Italy. · 6 Medical Oncology Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome La Sapienza, Rome, Italy. · 7 Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · 8 Medical Oncology Unit, Scientific Institute of Romagna for the Study and Treatment of Cancer (IRST), Meldola, Italy. · 9 Medical Oncology Unit, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. · 10 Medical Oncology Unit, ASST Bergamo Ovest, Treviglio, Italy. · 11 Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS Foundation Polyclinic San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. · 12 Medical Oncology Unit, II University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · 13 Medical Oncology Unit, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. · 14 Medical Oncology Unit, "Regina Elena" National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy. · 15 Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy. · 16 Medical Oncology Unit, Polytechnic University of the Marche, "Ospedali Riuniti Ancona," Ancona, Italy. · 17 Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Policlinico GB Rossi, Verona, Italy. · 18 Medical Oncology Unit, University Campus Biomedico, Rome, Italy. · 19 Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · 20 Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza" Foundation, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · 21 Arc-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · 22 Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, University of Milan, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Fondazione IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · 23 Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV), Padua, Italy. · 24 Hepatobiliary Surgery Unit, IRCCS A. Gemelli Polyclinic Foundation, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · 25 Oncology Unit, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · 26 Medical Oncology Unit, Modena Cancer Center, University Hospital of Modena, Modena, Italy. · 27 Scientific Direction, IRCCS Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II" of Bari, Bari, Italy. ·Tumori · Pubmed #30967031.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Exocrine pancreatic cancers include common type pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and cystic neoplasms, which account for 85% and 10% of cases, respectively. The remaining 5% are rare histotypes, comprising adenosquamous carcinoma, acinar cell carcinoma, signet ring cell carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, pancreatoblastoma, hepatoid carcinoma, undifferentiated carcinoma and its variant with osteoclast-like giant cells, solid pseudopapillary carcinoma, and carcinosarcoma. Due to their low incidence, little knowledge is available on their clinical and molecular features as well as on treatment choices. The national initiative presented here aims at the molecular characterization of series of rare histotypes for which therapeutic and follow-up data are available. METHODS: A nationwide Italian Rare Pancreatic Cancer (IRaPaCa) task force whose first initiative is a multicentric retrospective study involving 21 Italian cancer centers to retrieve histologic material and clinical and treatment data of at least 100 patients with rare exocrine pancreatic cancers has been created. After histologic revision by a panel of expert pathologists, DNA and RNA from paraffin tissues will be investigated by next-generation sequencing using molecular pathway-oriented and immune-oriented mutational and expression profiling panels constructed availing of the information from the International Cancer Genome Consortium. Bioinformatic analysis of data will drive validation studies by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, as well as nanostring assays. CONCLUSIONS: We expect to gather novel data on rare pancreatic cancer types that will be useful to inform the design of therapeutic choices.

6 Article Systemic Chemotherapy for Advanced Rare Pancreatic Histotype Tumors: A Retrospective Multicenter Analysis. 2018

Brunetti, Oronzo / Aprile, Giuseppe / Marchetti, Paolo / Vasile, Enrico / Casadei Gardini, Andrea / Scartozzi, Mario / Barni, Sandro / Delfanti, Sara / De Vita, Fernando / Di Costanzo, Francesco / Milella, Michele / Cella, Chiara Alessandra / Berardi, Rossana / Cataldo, Ivana / Scarpa, Aldo / Basile, Debora / Mazzuca, Federica / Graziano, Giusi / Argentiero, Antonella / Santini, Daniele / Reni, Michele / Cascinu, Stefano / Silvestris, Nicola. ·Medical Oncology Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome La Sapienza, Rome. · Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa. · Department of MedicalOncology, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola. · Medical Oncology Unit, University of Cagliari, Cagliari. · Medical Oncology Unit, ASST Bergamo Ovest, Treviglio. · Medical Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia. · Medical Oncology Unit, II University of Naples, Naples. · Medical OncologyUnit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Florence. · Medical Oncology 1, IRCCS Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome. · Division of Gastrointestinal and Neuroendocrine Tumors, IEO, Milan. · Medical Oncology Unit, Università Politecnica Marche - Ospedali Riuniti Ancona, Ancona. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, ARCNET, Verona. · Department of Medical Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine. · Scientific Direction, Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II," Bari. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Campus Biomedico, Rome. · Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan. · Modena Cancer Center, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria di Modena, Modena, Italy. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #29771769.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Two issues were put forth by clinicians in the management of the advanced stages of rare variants of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and other exocrine histotypes with peculiar clinical and pathological features: Do chemotherapy regimens recommended in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients have a clinical activity in rare pancreatic tumors? Or should other chemotherapy combinations be considered in this subset of patients? METHODS: We conducted a multicenter retrospective study that collected data from 2005 to 2016 at 14 Italian cancer centers with the aim to evaluate tumor response and time to progression for first- and second-line and overall survival. RESULTS: Of approximately 4300 exocrine pancreatic cancer patients, 79 advanced cases affected by rare histological types were identified, with pancreatic acinar cell cancer (n = 23), pancreatic adenosquamous cancer (n = 16), and mucinous cystic neoplasm with an associated invasive mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (n = 15) most represented. Survival analyses for each subgroup in relation with the different chemotherapy regimens showed the lack of statistical significance correlations. CONCLUSIONS: Because of the lack of clinical trials in patients affected by these rare pancreatic histotypes, only their molecular classification would help clinicians in future therapeutic choice.

7 Unspecified Translational challenges from the 2014 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium: toward a true tailored therapy through effective research. 2014

Aprile, Giuseppe / Giuliani, Francesco / Cordio, Stefano / Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea / Bencardino, Katia / Ongaro, Elena / Martines, Concetta / Giampieri, Riccardo / Bordonaro, Roberto / Siena, Salvatore / Cascinu, Stefano / Scartozzi, Mario. ·Medical Oncology, University & General Hospital, Udine, Italy. ·Future Oncol · Pubmed #24947252.

ABSTRACT: Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium 2014, San Francisco, CA, USA, 16-18 January 2014. The Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium represents an indisputable occasion for sharing results and research opportunities for investigators around the globe. Across the years along with clinical trials presentations the meeting increasingly acquired a distinct role as a scientific arena for translational research. Also, this year the need for predictive markers for first-generation targeted agents and research about novel biologically driven therapeutic options characterized most of the studies presented. We focus here on reports from the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium indicating an opportunity for biological selection of either the pharmacological target or the patient population in order to enhance clinical outcome.