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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Roberto Salvia
Based on 112 articles published since 2010
(Why 112 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, R. Salvia wrote the following 112 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5
1 Guideline Pathologic Evaluation and Reporting of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms of the Pancreas and Other Tumoral Intraepithelial Neoplasms of Pancreatobiliary Tract: Recommendations of Verona Consensus Meeting. 2016

Adsay, Volkan / Mino-Kenudson, Mari / Furukawa, Toru / Basturk, Olca / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Bassi, Claudio / Salvia, Roberto / Malleo, Giuseppe / Paiella, Salvatore / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Matthaei, Hanno / Offerhaus, G Johan / Adham, Mustapha / Bruno, Marco J / Reid, Michelle D / Krasinskas, Alyssa / Klöppel, Günter / Ohike, Nobuyuki / Tajiri, Takuma / Jang, Kee-Taek / Roa, Juan Carlos / Allen, Peter / Fernández-del Castillo, Carlos / Jang, Jin-Young / Klimstra, David S / Hruban, Ralph H / Anonymous6190823. ·*Department of Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine and Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, GA †Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA ‡Department of Pathology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan §Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY ¶Department of Pathology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy ||Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA **Department of Surgery, University of Verona, Verona, Italy ††Department of Surgery, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD ‡‡Departments of Surgery, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany §§Departments of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands ¶¶Department of Surgery, Edouard Herriot Hospital, HCL, Lyon, France ||||Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands ***Departments of Pathology, Technical University, Munich, Germany †††Department of Pathology, Showa University Fujigaoka Hospital, Yokohama, Japan ‡‡‡Department of Pathology, Tokai University Hachioji Hospital, Tokyo, Japan §§§Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea ¶¶¶Department of Pathology, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile ||||||Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY ****Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA ††††Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea ‡‡‡‡Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #25775066.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There are no established guidelines for pathologic diagnosis/reporting of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). DESIGN: An international multidisciplinary group, brought together by the Verona Pancreas Group in Italy-2013, was tasked to devise recommendations. RESULTS: (1) Crucial to rule out invasive carcinoma with extensive (if not complete) sampling. (2) Invasive component is to be documented in a full synoptic report including its size, type, grade, and stage. (3) The term "minimally invasive" should be avoided; instead, invasion size with stage and substaging of T1 (1a, b, c; ≤ 0.5, > 0.5-≤ 1, > 1 cm) is to be documented. (4) Largest diameter of the invasion, not the distance from the nearest duct, is to be used. (5) A category of "indeterminate/(suspicious) for invasion" is acceptable for rare cases. (6) The term "malignant" IPMN should be avoided. (7) The highest grade of dysplasia in the non-invasive component is to be documented separately. (8) Lesion size is to be correlated with imaging findings in cysts with rupture. (9) The main duct diameter and, if possible, its involvement are to be documented; however, it is not required to provide main versus branch duct classification in the resected tumor. (10) Subtyping as gastric/intestinal/pancreatobiliary/oncocytic/mixed is of value. (11) Frozen section is to be performed highly selectively, with appreciation of its shortcomings. (12) These principles also apply to other similar tumoral intraepithelial neoplasms (mucinous cystic neoplasms, intra-ampullary, and intra-biliary/cholecystic). CONCLUSIONS: These recommendations will ensure proper communication of salient tumor characteristics to the management teams, accurate comparison of data between analyses, and development of more effective management algorithms.

2 Guideline European experts consensus statement on cystic tumours of the pancreas. 2013

Del Chiaro, Marco / Verbeke, Caroline / Salvia, Roberto / Klöppel, Gunter / Werner, Jens / McKay, Colin / Friess, Helmut / Manfredi, Riccardo / Van Cutsem, Eric / Löhr, Matthias / Segersvärd, Ralf / Anonymous3160750. ·Division of Surgery, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: marco.del-chiaro@karolinska.se. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #23415799.

ABSTRACT: Cystic lesions of the pancreas are increasingly recognized. While some lesions show benign behaviour (serous cystic neoplasm), others have an unequivocal malignant potential (mucinous cystic neoplasm, branch- and main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and solid pseudo-papillary neoplasm). European expert pancreatologists provide updated recommendations: diagnostic computerized tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging are indicated in all patients with cystic lesion of the pancreas. Endoscopic ultrasound with cyst fluid analysis may be used but there is no evidence to suggest this as a routine diagnostic method. The role of pancreatoscopy remains to be established. Resection should be considered in all symptomatic lesions, in mucinous cystic neoplasm, main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and solid pseudo-papillary neoplasm as well as in branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with mural nodules, dilated main pancreatic duct >6mm and possibly if rapidly increasing in size. An oncological partial resection should be performed in main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and in lesions with a suspicion of malignancy, otherwise organ preserving procedures may be considered. Frozen section of the transection margin in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm is suggested. Follow up after resection is recommended for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, solid pseudo-papillary neoplasm and invasive cancer.

3 Editorial Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer. 2016

D'Onofrio, Mirko / Ciaravino, Valentina / De Robertis, Riccardo / Barbi, Emilio / Salvia, Roberto / Girelli, Roberto / Paiella, Salvatore / Gasparini, Camilla / Cardobi, Nicolò / Bassi, Claudio. ·Mirko D'Onofrio, Valentina Ciaravino, Riccardo De Robertis, Camilla Gasparini, Nicolò Cardobi, Department of Radiology, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #27956791.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review.

4 Editorial Radiofrequency ablation of locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma: an overview. 2010

D'Onofrio, Mirko / Barbi, Emilio / Girelli, Roberto / Martone, Enrico / Gallotti, Anna / Salvia, Roberto / Martini, Paolo-Tinazzi / Bassi, Claudio / Pederzoli, Paolo / Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto. ·Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, University of Verona, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, Verona 37134, Italy. mirko.donofrio@univr.it ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #20653055.

ABSTRACT: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of pancreatic neoplasms is restricted to locally advanced, non-resectable but non-metastatic tumors. RFA of pancreatic tumors is nowadays an ultrasound-guided procedure performed during laparotomy in open surgery. Intraoperative ultrasound covers the mandatory role of staging, evaluation of feasibility, guidance and monitoring of the procedure. Different types of needle can be used. The first aim in the evaluation of RFA as a treatment for locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, in order of evaluation but not of importance, is to determine the feasibility of the procedure. The second aim is to establish the effect of RFA on tumoral mass in terms of necrosis and cytoreduction. The most important aim, third in order of evaluation, is the potential improvement of quality of life and survival rate. Nowadays, only a few studies assess the feasibility of the procedure. The present paper is an overview of RFA for pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

5 Review Liquid Biopsy as Surrogate for Tissue for Molecular Profiling in Pancreatic Cancer: A Meta-Analysis Towards Precision Medicine. 2019

Luchini, Claudio / Veronese, Nicola / Nottegar, Alessia / Cappelletti, Vera / Daidone, Maria G / Smith, Lee / Parris, Christopher / Brosens, Lodewijk A A / Caruso, Maria G / Cheng, Liang / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Wood, Laura D / Milella, Michele / Salvia, Roberto / Scarpa, Aldo. ·Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. · National Institute of Gastroenterology-Research Hospital, IRCCS "S. de Bellis", Castellana Grotte, 70013 Bari, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Section of Pathology, San Bortolo Hospital, 36100 Vicenza, Italy. · Applied Research and Technological Development Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, 20133 Milano, Italy. · Faculty of Science and Engineering, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK. · Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, 3584CX Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, 6526GA Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. · Department of Surgery, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21211, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21211, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21211, USA. · Department of Medicine, Section of Medical Oncology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. · Department of General and Visceral Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. · Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. aldo.scarpa@univr.it. · ARC-Net Research Center, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. aldo.scarpa@univr.it. ·Cancers (Basel) · Pubmed #31405192.

ABSTRACT: Liquid biopsy (LB) is a non-invasive approach representing a promising tool for new precision medicine strategies for cancer treatment. However, a comprehensive analysis of its reliability for pancreatic cancer (PC) is lacking. To this aim, we performed the first meta-analysis on this topic. We calculated the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive (LR+) and negative (LR-) likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR). A summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) and area under curve (AUC) were used to evaluate the overall accuracy. We finally assessed the concordance rate of all mutations detected by multi-genes panels. Fourteen eligible studies involving 369 patients were included. The overall pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.70 and 0.86, respectively. The LR+ was 3.85, the LR- was 0.34 and DOR was 15.84. The SROC curve with an AUC of 0.88 indicated a relatively high accuracy of LB for molecular characterization of PC. The concordance rate of all mutations detected by multi-genes panels was 31.9%. LB can serve as surrogate for tissue in the molecular profiling of PC, because of its relatively high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. It represents a unique opportunity to be further explored towards its introduction in clinical practice and for developing new precision medicine approaches against PC.

6 Review Molecular and clinical patterns of local progression in the pancreatic remnant following resection of pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). 2019

Sereni, Elisabetta / Luchini, Claudio / Salvia, Roberto / Pea, Antonio. ·Unit of General and Pancreatic Surgery, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Unit of General and Pancreatic Surgery, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. antonio.pea@univr.it. ·Chin Clin Oncol · Pubmed #31070041.

ABSTRACT: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) are pancreatic cystic lesions that can progress to invasive carcinoma. Consensus guidelines indicate surgery for IPMN at high risk of malignant progression, as assessed by specific radiological and clinical criteria, whereas an active radiological surveillance is recommended for IPMN at low risk of malignancy. The management of IPMN is further complicated by the risk of developing a distinct new cyst or a ductal adenocarcinoma in the remnant pancreas, either synchronously or metachronously. Several studies therefore investigated local progression in the remnant pancreas following partial pancreatic resection for IPMN and whether an unstable epithelium at risk for malignant degeneration may exist. Understanding the biological mechanisms behind progression of IPMN will help in identifying patients that would benefit from the resection of the entire pancreas.

7 Review None 2019

Salvia, Roberto / Casciani, Fabio / Sereni, Elisabetta / Bassi, Claudio. ·University of Verona Hospital Trust, The Pancreas Institute, Unit of General and Pancreatic Surgery, Verona, Italy. · University of Verona Hospital Trust, The Pancreas Institute, Unit of General and Pancreatic Surgery, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: fabio.casciani01@gmail.com. ·Presse Med · Pubmed #30878338.

ABSTRACT: This chapter focuses on the most recent advantages in the medical treatment of localized pancreatic cancer.

8 Review Prognostic Role of High-Grade Tumor Budding in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis with a Focus on Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition. 2019

Lawlor, Rita T / Veronese, Nicola / Nottegar, Alessia / Malleo, Giuseppe / Smith, Lee / Demurtas, Jacopo / Cheng, Liang / Wood, Laura D / Silvestris, Nicola / Salvia, Roberto / Scarpa, Aldo / Luchini, Claudio. ·ARC-Net Research Center, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. ritateresa.lawlor@univr.it. · National Institute of Gastroenterology-Research Hospital, IRCCS "S. de Bellis", 70013 Castellana Grotte, Italy. ilmannato@gmail.com. · Department of Surgery, Section of Pathology, San Bortolo Hospital, 36100 Vicenza, Italy. alessia.nottegar@gmail.com. · Department of General and Pancreatic Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37142 Verona, Italy. giuseppe.malleo@univr.it. · Cambridge Centre for Sport and Excercise Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK. Lee.Smith@anglia.ac.uk. · Primary Care Department, Azienda USL Toscana Sud Est, 58100 Grosseto, Italy. eritrox7@gmail.com. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. liang_cheng@yahoo.com. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA. ldelong1@jhmi.edu. · Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II" of Bari, 70124 Bari, Italy. silvestrisnicola@gmail.com. · Department of General and Pancreatic Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37142 Verona, Italy. roberto.salvia@univr.it. · ARC-Net Research Center, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. aldo.scarpa@univr.it. · Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. aldo.scarpa@univr.it. · Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy. claudio.luchini@univr.it. ·Cancers (Basel) · Pubmed #30669452.

ABSTRACT: This study aims at clarifying the prognostic role of high-grade tumor budding (TB) in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with the first systematic review and meta-analysis on this topic. Furthermore, we analyzed with a systematic review the relationship between TB and a recently suggested TB-associated mechanism: the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Analyzing a total of 613 patients, 251 of them (40.9%) with high grade-TB, we found an increased risk of all-cause mortality (RR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.13⁻1.88,

9 Review Ablation treatments in unresectable pancreatic cancer. 2019

Paiella, Salvatore / De Pastena, Matteo / Romeo, Francesco / D'onofrio, Mirko / Fontana, Martina / Pea, Antonio / De Marchi, Giulia / Crinò, Stefano F / Bassi, Claudio / Salvia, Roberto. ·Unit of General and Pancreatic Surgery, Pancreas Institute, Policlinico GB Rossi, University of Verona, Verona, Italy - Salvatore.paiella@univr.it. · Unit of General and Pancreatic Surgery, Pancreas Institute, Policlinico GB Rossi, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Unit of Radiology, Pancreas Institute, Policlinico GB Rossi, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Unit of Gastroenterology B, Pancreas Institute, Policliclino GB Rossi, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, Pancreas Institute, Policliclino GB Rossi, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Minerva Chir · Pubmed #30600963.

ABSTRACT: Ablation treatments have been increasingly applied as an alternative treatment for unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). The goal of LAPC therapy is surgical resection with negative margins (R0); however, that can be achieved only in a minority of patients and only following neoadjuvant treatment. Ablation might be useful for those patients with unresectable LAPC that do not progress towards metastatic stage and do not experience a true downstaging. Indeed, some LAPC that tend to grow locally, might be the subgroup of tumors that could benefit from ablation. Experience is necessary to select patients and the technique to adopt, since serious or fatal complications can occur. This review aims to discuss the role of ablation treatments in LAPC, with a unique focus on radiofrequency ablation and irreversible electroporation.

10 Review The Clinical Management of Main Duct Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas. 2019

Dal Borgo, Chiara / Perri, Giampaolo / Borin, Alex / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Salvia, Roberto / Bassi, Claudio. ·Department of General and Pancreatic Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of General and Pancreatic Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italygiamperri@hotmail.it. ·Dig Surg · Pubmed #29421807.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas comprise a heterogeneous group of intraductal mucin-producing neoplasms representing a typical adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence. The involvement of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) is a feature of paramount importance, directly related to a more aggressive biology and a higher malignancy rate. METHOD: We review and discuss the clinical management of IPMNs with a MPD involvement, recalling the different consensus guidelines and addressing recent controversies in literature, presenting the current clinical practice in Verona Pancreas Institute. RESULTS: All the aspects of surgical management were discussed, from the indication for surgery to the intraoperative management and the follow-up strategies. CONCLUSION: The management of presumed IPMNs involving the MPD at our Institution is in line with the International Association of Pancreatology 2012 guidelines, revised in 2016. Surgical resection proposed should achieve the complete removal of the tumor with negative margins. Despite a good prognosis in terms of survival of overall resected main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, follow-up should not be discontinued.

11 Review Palliative therapy in pancreatic cancer-interventional treatment with radiofrequency ablation/irreversible electroporation. 2018

Paiella, Salvatore / De Pastena, Matteo / D'Onofrio, Mirko / Crinò, Stefano Francesco / Pan, Teresa Lucia / De Robertis, Riccardo / Elio, Giovanni / Martone, Enrico / Bassi, Claudio / Salvia, Roberto. ·General and Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Policlinico GB Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro, Verona, Italy. · Radiology Unit, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Policlinico GB Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro, Verona, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Policlinico GB Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro, Verona, Italy. · Radiology Unit, Ospedale Pederzoli, Peschiera del Garda, Verona, Italy. ·Transl Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #30505967.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a solid tumor with still a dismal prognosis. Diagnosis is usually late, when the disease is metastatic or locally advanced (LAPC). Only 20% of PC are amenable to surgery at the time of diagnosis and the vast majority of them, despite radically resected will unavoidably recur. The treatment of LAPC is a challenge. Current guidelines suggest to adopt systemic therapies upfront, based on multi-drugs chemotherapy regimens. However, the vast majority of patients will never experience conversion to surgical exploration and radical resection. Thus, there a large subgroup of LAPC patients where the only therapeutic chance is to offer palliative treatments, such as interventional ablative treatments, in order to obtain a cytoreduction of the tumor, trying to delay its growth and spread. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and irreversible electroporation (IRE) demonstrated to be safe and effective in obtaining a local control of the disease with some promising oncological results in terms of overall survival (OS). However, they should be adopted as a treatment strategy to adopt in parallel with other systemic therapies, within multidisciplinary choices. They are not free from complications, even serious, thus they should applied only in specialized centers of pancreatology. This review depicts the state of the art of the two techniques.

12 Review Surveillance of Cystic Lesions of the Pancreas: Whom and How to Survey? 2018

Andrianello, Stefano / Falconi, Massimo / Salvia, Roberto / Crippa, Stefano / Marchegiani, Giovanni. ·Pancreatic Surgery Unit of the Department of Surgery, Verona University Hospital, Verona, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Centre, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 'Vita-Salute' University, Milan, Italy. ·Visc Med · Pubmed #30140686.

ABSTRACT: The sudden prevalence increase of pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCN) related to the use of cross-sectional imaging has raised several concerns. Even if there is a tangible risk of progression towards pancreatic cancer (PC), surgical resection cannot be offered to all patients due to the high risk of morbidity and mortality. Available guidelines are useful tools to identify patients at higher risk for harboring cancer thanks to their sensitivity. Because of their low specificity, however, such a risk is often overestimated. Recent evidence deriving from large observational series of surveilled patients suggests that the overall risk of PC is low. A large proportion of patients affected by PCN can be safely observed over time. Several follow-up schedules have been proposed in guidelines but none of them proved to be the most cost-effective. Moreover, it must still be demonstrated that any surveillance protocol can be associated with a reduction in PC-related mortality. By now, with most studies reporting a lifelong risk of malignancy, the only evidence-based recommendation regarding surveillance is that follow-up should never be discontinued as repeated observations are crucial for PC risk stratification.

13 Review Pancreatic Cancer in the Era of Neoadjuvant Therapy: A Narrative Overview. 2018

Casciani, Fabio / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Malleo, Giuseppe / Bassi, Claudio / Salvia, Roberto. · ·Chirurgia (Bucur) · Pubmed #29981662.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an aggressive systemic disease with around 30% of patient presenting locally advanced disease at diagnosis and being not candidate to surgical resection. Pioneering experiences with neoadjuvant treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) were undertaken more than 25 years ago and this strategy kept on gaining consensus over time. In recent years two main breakthroughs have been done: first, clear definitions of resectable, borderline resectable and locally advanced unresectable disease were released, and, soon after, two different chemotherapy regimens (namely, FOLFIRINOX and Gemcitabine plus Nab-Paclitaxel) were introduced in the clinical practice for LAPC after their effectiveness in metastatic patients was demonstrated. This article reviews papers regarding the administration of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, with or without radiation therapy, published from 2011 through 2017 with particular significance been given to reported results in term of resection rates, complete resection (R0) rates and Overall Survival, and briefly summarizes recommendations provided by the most recent guidelines for the treatment of non-metastatic pancreatic cancer.

14 Review Screening/surveillance programs for pancreatic cancer in familial high-risk individuals: A systematic review and proportion meta-analysis of screening results. 2018

Paiella, Salvatore / Salvia, Roberto / De Pastena, Matteo / Pollini, Tommaso / Casetti, Luca / Landoni, Luca / Esposito, Alessandro / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Malleo, Giuseppe / De Marchi, Giulia / Scarpa, Aldo / D'Onofrio, Mirko / De Robertis, Riccardo / Pan, Teresa Lucia / Maggino, Laura / Andrianello, Stefano / Secchettin, Erica / Bonamini, Deborah / Melisi, Davide / Tuveri, Massimiliano / Bassi, Claudio. ·General and Pancreatic Surgery Department, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: salvatore.paiella@univr.it. · General and Pancreatic Surgery Department, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Gastroenterology B Unit, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy; ARC-NET Research Center, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, Casa di Cura Pederzoli Hospital, Peschiera del Garda, Italy. · Oncology Unit, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #29709409.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Screening/surveillance programs for pancreatic cancer (PC) in familial high-risk individuals (FPC-HRI) have been widely reported, but their merits remain unclear. The data reported so far are heterogeneous-especially in terms of screening yield. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of currently available data coming from screening/surveillance programs to evaluate the proportion of screening goal achievement (SGA), overall surgery and unnecessary surgery. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed and the Cochrane Library database from January 2000 to December 2016to identify studies reporting results of screening/surveillance programs including cohorts of FPC-HRI. The main outcome measures were weighted proportion of SGA, overall surgery, and unnecessary surgery among the FPC-HRI cohort, using a random effects model. SGA was defined as any diagnosis of resectable PC, PanIN3, or high-grade dysplasia intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (HGD-IPMN). Unnecessary surgery was defined as any other final pathology. RESULTS: In a meta-analysis of 16 studies reporting on 1551 FPC-HRI cases, 30 subjects (1.82%), received a diagnosis of PC, PanIN3 or HGD-IPMNs. The pooled proportion of SGA was 1.4%(95% CI 0.8-2, p < 0.001, I CONCLUSIONS: The weighted proportion of SGA of screening/surveillance programs published thus far is excellent. However, the probability of receiving surgery during the screening/surveillance program is non-negligible, and unnecessary surgery is a potential negative outcome.

15 Review Systematic review, meta-analysis, and a high-volume center experience supporting the new role of mural nodules proposed by the updated 2017 international guidelines on IPMN of the pancreas. 2018

Marchegiani, Giovanni / Andrianello, Stefano / Borin, Alex / Dal Borgo, Chiara / Perri, Giampaolo / Pollini, Tommaso / Romanò, Giorgia / D'Onofrio, Mirko / Gabbrielli, Armando / Scarpa, Aldo / Malleo, Giuseppe / Bassi, Claudio / Salvia, Roberto. ·General and Pancreatic Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Radiology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Pathology, ARCNet Research Center, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · General and Pancreatic Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: roberto.salvia@univr.it. ·Surgery · Pubmed #29454468.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mural nodules (MNs) have a predominant role in the 2016 revision of the international guidelines on intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) of the pancreas. The aim of this study was to evaluate MNs as predictors of invasive cancer (iCa) or high-grade dysplasia (HGD) in IPMNs and to investigate the role of MN size in risk prediction. METHODS: A PRISMA-compliant systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis on selected studies were conducted. The random effect model was adopted, and the pooled SMD (standardized mean difference) obtained. The surgical series of IPMNs at a single high-volume institution was reviewed. RESULTS: This review included 70 studies and 2297 resected IPMNs. MNs have a positive predictive value for malignancy of 62.2%. The meta-analysis suggested that MN size has a considerable effect on predicting IPMNs with both iCa or HGD with a mean SMD of 0.79. All studies included in the meta-analysis used contrast-enhanced endosonography (CE-EUS) to assess MNs. Due to the heterogeneity of the proposed thresholds, no reliable MN size cut-off was identified. Of 317 IPMNs resected at our institution, 102 (32.1%) had a preoperative diagnosis of MN. Multivariate analysis showed that MN is the only independent predictor of iCa and HGD for all types of IPMNs. CONCLUSION: MNs are reliable predictors of iCa and HGD in IPMNs as proposed by the 2016 IAP guidelines. CE-EUS seems to be the best tool for characterizing size and has the best accuracy for predicting malignancy. Further studies should determine potential MN dimensional cut-offs.

16 Review Revisions of international consensus Fukuoka guidelines for the management of IPMN of the pancreas. 2017

Tanaka, Masao / Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos / Kamisawa, Terumi / Jang, Jin Young / Levy, Philippe / Ohtsuka, Takao / Salvia, Roberto / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Tada, Minoru / Wolfgang, Christopher L. ·Department of Surgery, Shimonoseki City Hospital, Shimonoseki, Japan. Electronic address: masaotan@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp. · Pancreas and Biliary Surgery Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Komagome Metropolitan Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Division of Hepatobiliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. · Pôle des Maladies de l'Appareil Digestif, Service de Gastroentérologie-Pancréatologie, Hopital Beaujon, Clichy Cedex, France. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. · Department of General and Pancreatic Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Dept. of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. · Cameron Division of Surgical Oncology and The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #28735806.

ABSTRACT: The management of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) continues to evolve. In particular, the indications for resection of branch duct IPMN have changed from early resection to more deliberate observation as proposed by the international consensus guidelines of 2006 and 2012. Another guideline proposed by the American Gastroenterological Association in 2015 restricted indications for surgery more stringently and recommended physicians to stop surveillance if no significant change had occurred in a pancreatic cyst after five years of surveillance, or if a patient underwent resection and a non-malignant IPMN was found. Whether or not it is safe to do so, as well as the method and interval of surveillance, has generated substantial debate. Based on a consensus symposium held during the meeting of the International Association of Pancreatology in Sendai, Japan, in 2016, the working group has revised the guidelines regarding prediction of invasive carcinoma and high-grade dysplasia, surveillance, and postoperative follow-up of IPMN. As the working group did not recognize the need for major revisions of the guidelines, we made only minor revisions and added most recent articles where appropriate. The present guidelines include updated information and recommendations based on our current understanding, and highlight issues that remain controversial or where further research is required.

17 Review Role of local ablative techniques (Radiofrequency ablation and Irreversible Electroporation) in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. 2016

Paiella, Salvatore / Salvia, Roberto / Girelli, Roberto / Frigerio, Isabella / Giardino, Alessandro / D'Onofrio, Mirko / De Marchi, Giulia / Bassi, Claudio. ·General and Pancreatic Surgery Department, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgical Unit, Casa di Cura Pederzoli, Peschiera Del Garda, Verona, Italy. · Radiology Department, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Gastroenterology B Department, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · General and Pancreatic Surgery Department, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. Claudio.bassi@univr.it. ·Updates Surg · Pubmed #27535401.

ABSTRACT: Thanks to continuous research and investment in technology, the ablation of tumors has become common. Through the application of different types of energy is possible to induce cellular injury of the neoplastic tissue, leading to cellular death. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and irreversible electroporation (IRE) represent the most applied ablative techniques on pancreatic cancer. RFA and IRE, causing necrosis and apoptosis of neoplastic cells, are able to destroy neoplastic tissue, to drastically modify the neoplastic microenvironment and, possibly, to stimulate both directly and indirectly the anti-tumor immune system. This article provides part of our experience with the application of RFA and IRE on pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC).

18 Review The prognostic impact of para-aortic lymph node metastasis in pancreatic cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2016

Paiella, S / Sandini, M / Gianotti, L / Butturini, G / Salvia, R / Bassi, C. ·Unit of General Surgery B, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: salvatore.paiella@ospedaleuniverona.it. · Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, Milano Bicocca University, Monza, Italy. · Unit of General Surgery B, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #26916137.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate by a meta-analytic approach the long-term prognostic impact of para-aortic lymph node (PALN) involvement in resected ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. METHODS: MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched from January 1990 to June 2015. Trials reporting Kaplan-Meier curves and comparing overall long-term survival of negative and metastatic PALN in patients who underwent resection for pancreatic cancer were included. Lymph nodes were classified according to the Japan Pancreatic Society rules and identified using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95%CI were estimated for each trial and pooled in a meta-analysis. RESULTS: Thirteen eligible studies including 2141 patients (364 positive PALN; 1777 negative PALN) were identified. Most of the studies were retrospective. Heterogeneity among trials was high (I(2) = 98.7%; p < .001). PALN metastasis was associated with increased mortality when compared with patients with negative PALN regardless regional nodal status [HR 1.85, 95%CI 1.48-2.31; p < .001]. Median survival was significantly decreased in patients with positive PALN (WMD = -4.92 months 95%CI -6.40; -3.43; p < .001). Moreover, metastatic PALN affected mortality also when regional lymph nodes were positive [HR 1.67, 95%CI 1.34-2.08; p < .001]. No publication bias was detected. CONCLUSIONS: PALN metastasis appears to correlate with poor prognosis in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The assessment of PALN status may be considered for a more accurate staging of the disease and appropriated subgroup survival reporting. However, the definitive avoidance of the resection in case of intraoperative metastatic PALN needs further investigation.

19 Review Uncommon presentations of common pancreatic neoplasms: a pictorial essay. 2015

D'Onofrio, Mirko / De Robertis, Riccardo / Capelli, Paola / Tinazzi Martini, Paolo / Crosara, Stefano / Gobbo, Stefano / Butturini, Giovanni / Salvia, Roberto / Barbi, Emilio / Girelli, Roberto / Bassi, Claudio / Pederzoli, Paolo. ·Department of Radiology, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona, Piazzale L.A. Scuro, 10, 37134, Verona, Italy, mirko.donofrio@univr.it. ·Abdom Imaging · Pubmed #25772002.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neoplasms are a wide group of solid and cystic lesions with different and often characteristic imaging features, clinical presentations, and management. Among solid tumors, ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common: it arises from exocrine pancreas, comprises about 90% of all pancreatic neoplasms, and generally has a bad prognosis; its therapeutic management must be multidisciplinary, involving surgeons, oncologists, gastroenterologists, radiologists, and radiotherapists. The second most common solid pancreatic neoplasms are neuroendocrine tumors: they can be divided into functioning or non-functioning and present different degrees of malignancy. Cystic pancreatic neoplasms comprise serous neoplasms, which are almost always benign, mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, which can vary from benign to frankly malignant lesions, and solid pseudopapillary tumors. Other pancreatic neoplasms, such as lymphoma, metastases, or pancreatoblastoma, are rarely seen in clinical practice and have different and sometimes controversial managements. Rare clinical presentations and imaging appearance of the most common pancreatic neoplasms, both solid and cystic, are more frequently seen and clinically relevant than rare pancreatic tumors; their pathologic and radiologic appearances must be known to improve their management. The purpose of this paper is to present some rare or uncommon clinical and radiological presentations of common pancreatic neoplasms providing examples of multi-modality imaging approach with pathologic correlations, thus describing the histopathological bases that can explain the peculiar imaging features, in order to avoid relevant misdiagnosis and to improve lesion management.

20 Review Pancreatic hepatoid carcinoma: a review of the literature. 2013

Marchegiani, Giovanni / Gareer, Haytham / Parisi, Alice / Capelli, Paola / Bassi, Claudio / Salvia, Roberto. ·Department of Surgery, Verona University Hospital, Verona, Italy. ·Dig Surg · Pubmed #24281319.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hepatoid carcinomas (HCs) are extrahepatic neoplasms exhibiting features of hepatocellular tumors in terms of morphology and immunohistochemistry. They have been described in several organs, most notably in the stomach and ovary. They can present in pure forms or in association with other morphological aspects, such as endocrine tumors or ductal adenocarcinomas. The aim of this review is to describe aspects of hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the pancreas with regard to epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment. METHODS: The PubMed database was searched for publications addressing hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. We have searched for articles including the following keywords: 'pancreatic hepatoid carcinoma', 'ectopic liver cancer' and 'rare pancreas neoplasm' published to date. As references, we used case reports and review articles. RESULTS: Pancreatic forms of HCs are extremely uncommon: only 22 cases have been reported. CONCLUSIONS: The possibility of an HC of the pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an uncommon pathological mass of the pancreas. Treatment seems to be related to the association with other neoplasms, tumor extension at the time of diagnosis and the possibility to perform a radical resection. The common embryologic origin of the pancreas and liver, together with peculiar environmental factors, may explain the development of pancreatic HCs.

21 Review Drain management after pancreatic resection: state of the art. 2011

Giovinazzo, Francesco / Butturini, Giovanni / Salvia, Roberto / Mascetta, Giuseppe / Monsellato, Daniela / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Pederzoli, Paolo / Bassi, Claudio. ·Surgical Department, Pancreas Centre, Hospital of 'G.B.Rossi', University of Verona, Piazzale 'L.A. Scuro', 37134, Verona, Italy. · Surgical Department, Pancreas Centre, Hospital of 'G.B.Rossi', University of Verona, Piazzale 'L.A. Scuro', 37134, Verona, Italy. claudio.bassi@univr.it. · Department of Surgery, General Surgery B, P.Le L.A. Scuro 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. claudio.bassi@univr.it. ·J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Sci · Pubmed #21861143.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Placement of intraperitoneal drain (ID) after abdominal surgery is a common practice. Postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF), incidence of which ranges from 2% to more than 30%, represents the most common major complication after pancreatic resection. The goal of this paper is to review the state of the art in ID management after pancreatic resection. METHODS: Data from randomized controlled trials (RCT) are reported together with data from our institution in the period before and after the start of the two reported RCTs. RESULTS: One thousand five hundred eighty patients underwent surgical resection for pancreatic lesions at our institution from 1990 to 2010. The overall rate of POPF was 23% before and 19.5% after (p = 0.24) the performance of the RCTs. Both postoperative morbidity and average in-hospital stay were higher in the period before the RCTs (13.6 ± 11.4 versus 13.4 ± 10.3 days, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: POPF is a complex and multifactorial complication after pancreatic surgery. On the basis of the present results and review of the RCTs, the value of ID and its management after pancreatic surgery remain unclear.

22 Review Pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer: the Verona experience. 2011

Malleo, Giuseppe / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Salvia, Roberto / Butturini, Giovanni / Pederzoli, Paolo / Bassi, Claudio. ·Department of Surgery, General Surgery B, G.B. Rossi Hospital, P.Le L.A. Scuro 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. ·Surg Today · Pubmed #21431477.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the Western world. The current treatment is multimodal, and in resectable patients radical surgery represents the key-step toward long-term survival. Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is the most widely performed operation, because the majority of ductal carcinomas arise in the head of the pancreas. Once considered extremely hazardous, PD has evolved into a safe procedure, with mortality below 5% and morbidity rates in the range from 20% to 60% at high-volume centers. Verona is regarded as one of the most prominent institutions for pancreatic surgery in Europe. More than 5500 patients with pancreatic diseases have been managed, and the surgical case load has increased substantially, with more than 1350 PDs performed. This review discusses this center's experience in surgical treatment of pancreatic head cancer. Furthermore, the preliminary results of radiofrequency thermal ablation of locally advanced ductal cancer are presented.

23 Review Pancreatic cystic tumours: when to resect, when to observe. 2010

Salvia, R / Crippa, S / Partelli, S / Malleo, G / Marcheggiani, G / Bacchion, M / Butturini, G / Bassi, C. ·Department of Surgery, Chirurgia Generale B, Policlinico "GB Rossi", University of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci · Pubmed #20496554.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In recent years there has been an increase in the diagnosis of cystic tumors of the pancreas. In this setting, difficult diagnostic problems and different therapeutic management can be proposed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A review of the literature and authors experience were undertaken. RESULTS: Cystic tumors of the pancreas include different neoplasms with a different biological behaviour. While most serous cystadenomas (SCAs) can be managed nonoperatively, patients with mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs), solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPTs), main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) should undergo surgical resection. Branch-duct IPMNs can be observed with radiological and clinical follow-up when asymptomatic, < 3 cm in size and without radiologic features of malignancy (i.e. nodules). CONCLUSIONS: Cystic tumors of the pancreas are common. Differential diagnosis among the different tumor-types is of paramount importance for appropriate management. Nonoperative management seems appropriate for most SCAs and for well-selected branch-duct IPMNs.

24 Clinical Trial Is there a role for near-infrared technology in laparoscopic resection of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors? Results of the COLPAN "colour-and-resect the pancreas" study. 2017

Paiella, Salvatore / De Pastena, Matteo / Landoni, Luca / Esposito, Alessandro / Casetti, Luca / Miotto, Marco / Ramera, Marco / Salvia, Roberto / Secchettin, Erica / Bonamini, Deborah / Manzini, Gessica / D'Onofrio, Mirko / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Bassi, Claudio. ·General and Pancreatic Surgery Department, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Policlinico GB Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro, 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. salvatore.paiella@univr.it. · General and Pancreatic Surgery Department, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Policlinico GB Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro, 10, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Radiology Department, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Surg Endosc · Pubmed #28374260.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The intraoperative identification of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) is of utmost importance to drive their laparoscopic resection. Near-infrared (NIR) surgery has emerged as a new technique for localizing tumors or neoplastic tissue. This study aimed to explore the results of the application of NIR in the laparoscopic resection of PanNETs. METHODS: Per protocol we enrolled ten subjects undergoing laparoscopic pancreatic surgery for PanNET from March 2016 to October 2016. During surgery, the patients were injected with indocyanine green dye (ICG, 25 mg given in 5 boli of 5 mg each). The switch-activation of NIR was performed to identify PanNETs. An ex-post analysis of the images was realized using ImageJ Software® to calculate the fluorescence signal. RESULTS: NIR imaging identified all ten PanNETs. Nine (90%) laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and one (10%) laparoscopic enucleation were performed. The mean maximum tumor dimension was 2.4 cm (range 1-4 cm). Eight non-functioning PanNETs (80%) and two insulinomas (20%) were found at the final pathology. Nine out of ten (90%) PanNETs were detected after the second ICG bolus. The mean latency time was 80 s and the mean visibility time was 220 s. The peak of tumor visualization was reached 20 min after the last bolus. This finding was confirmed by the ex-post analysis of the fluorescence signal (mean signal-to-background ratio of 7.7, p = 0.001). NIR identified two additional lesions, which turned out to be normal lymph nodes at final pathology. A fluorescent signal was identified at the bed of the enucleation, and thus, a further exeresis was performed and final pathology revealed that is was residual neoplastic tissue. CONCLUSIONS: This explorative study shows that NIR with ICG can have a role in laparoscopic pancreatic resection of PanNETs. Further studies are needed to assess the proper setting and role of this new and promising technology.

25 Clinical Trial Safety and feasibility of Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer: results of a prospective study. 2015

Paiella, Salvatore / Butturini, Giovanni / Frigerio, Isabella / Salvia, Roberto / Armatura, Giulia / Bacchion, Matilde / Fontana, Martina / D'Onofrio, Mirko / Martone, Enrico / Bassi, Claudio. ·Unit of Pancreatic and General Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. ·Dig Surg · Pubmed #25765775.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate the safety of the NanoKnife Low Energy Direct Current (LEDC) System (Irreversible Electroporation, IRE) in order to treat patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS: Prospective, nonrandomized, single-center clinical evaluation of ten patients with a cytohystological diagnosis of unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) that was no further responsive to standard treatments. The primary outcome was the rate of procedure-related abdominal complications. The secondary endpoints included the evaluation of the short-term efficacy of IRE through the evaluation of tumor reduction at imaging and biological tumor response as shown by CA 19-9, clinical assessments and patient quality of life. RESULTS: Ten patients (5 males, 5 females) were enrolled, with a median age of 66 and median tumor size of 30 mm. All patients were treated successfully with a median procedure time of 79.5 min. Two procedure-related complications were described in one patient (10%): a pancreatic abscess with a pancreoduodenal fistula. Three patients had early progression of disease: one patient developed pulmonary metastases 30 days post-IRE and two patients had liver metastases 60 days after the procedure. We registered an overall survival of 7.5 months (range: 2.9-15.9). CONCLUSIONS: IRE is a safe procedure in patients with LAPC and may represent a new technological option in the treatment and multimodality management of this disease.

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