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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by John R. Saltzman
Based on 6 articles published since 2009
(Why 6 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, John R. Saltzman wrote the following 6 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline The role of endoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of cystic pancreatic neoplasms. 2016

Anonymous6580868 / Muthusamy, V Raman / Chandrasekhara, Vinay / Acosta, Ruben D / Bruining, David H / Chathadi, Krishnavel V / Eloubeidi, Mohamad A / Faulx, Ashley L / Fonkalsrud, Lisa / Gurudu, Suryakanth R / Khashab, Mouen A / Kothari, Shivangi / Lightdale, Jenifer R / Pasha, Shabana F / Saltzman, John R / Shaukat, Aasma / Wang, Amy / Yang, Julie / Cash, Brooks D / DeWitt, John M. · ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #27206409.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline The role of endoscopy in the evaluation and management of patients with solid pancreatic neoplasia. 2016

Anonymous1760853 / Eloubeidi, Mohamad A / Decker, G Anton / Chandrasekhara, Vinay / Chathadi, Krishnavel V / Early, Dayna S / Evans, John A / Fanelli, Robert D / Fisher, Deborah A / Foley, Kimberly / Hwang, Joo Ha / Jue, Terry L / Lightdale, Jenifer R / Pasha, Shabana F / Saltzman, John R / Sharaf, Ravi / Shergill, Amandeep K / Cash, Brooks D / DeWitt, John M. · ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #26706297.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Article Metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma mimicking autoimmune pancreatitis diagnosed by EUS-guided fine-needle biopsy. 2018

Fox, Victor L / Yasuda, Jessica / Al-Ibraheemi, Alyaa / Saltzman, John R. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Pathology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endoscopy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #29627494.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Article Linear-array EUS improves detection of pancreatic lesions in high-risk individuals: a randomized tandem study. 2015

Shin, Eun Ji / Topazian, Mark / Goggins, Michael G / Syngal, Sapna / Saltzman, John R / Lee, Jeffrey H / Farrell, James J / Canto, Marcia I. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Division of Population Sciences, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Division of Gastroenterology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Section of Digestive Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #25930097.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Studies comparing linear and radial EUS for the detection of pancreatic lesions in an asymptomatic population with increased risk for pancreatic cancer are lacking. OBJECTIVES: To compare pancreatic lesion detection rates between radial and linear EUS and to determine the incremental diagnostic yield of a second EUS examination. DESIGN: Randomized controlled tandem study. SETTING: Five academic centers in the United States. PATIENTS: Asymptomatic high-risk individuals (HRIs) for pancreatic cancer undergoing screening EUS. INTERVENTIONS: Linear and radial EUS performed in randomized order. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Pancreatic lesion detection rate by type of EUS, miss rate of 1 EUS examination, and incremental diagnostic yield of a second EUS examination (second-pass effect). RESULTS: Two hundred seventy-eight HRIs were enrolled, mean age 56 years (43.2%), and 90% were familial pancreatic cancer relatives. Two hundred twenty-four HRIs underwent tandem radial and linear EUS. When we used per-patient analysis, the overall prevalence of any pancreatic lesion was 45%. Overall, 16 of 224 HRIs (7.1%) had lesions missed during the initial EUS that were detected by the second EUS examination. The per-patient lesion miss rate was significantly greater for radial followed by linear EUS (9.8%) than for linear followed by radial EUS (4.5%) (P = .03). When we used per-lesion analysis, 73 of 109 lesions (67%) were detected by radial EUS and 99 of 120 lesions (82%) were detected by linear EUS (P < .001) during the first examination. The overall miss rate for a pancreatic lesion after 1 EUS examination was 47 of 229 (25%). The miss rate was significantly lower for linear EUS compared with radial EUS (17.5% vs 33.0%, P = .007). LIMITATIONS: Most detected pancreatic lesions were not confirmed by pathology. CONCLUSION: Linear EUS detects more pancreatic lesions than radial EUS. There was a "second-pass effect" with additional lesions detected with a second EUS examination. This effect was significantly greater when linear EUS was used after an initial radial EUS examination.

5 Article Utility of commercial DNA analysis in detecting malignancy within pancreatic cysts. 2013

Lee, Linda S / Wu, Bechien U / Banks, Peter A / Kadiyala, Vivek / Mehta, Shivani / Saltzman, John R / Thompson, Christopher C / Bellizzi, Andrew M. ·Center for Pancreatic Disease, Brigham and Women's Hospital. Boston, MA, USA. lslee@partners.org. ·JOP · Pubmed #24618422.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Pancreatic cysts raise concern because of their malignant potential. Our aims were to assess accuracy of DNA analysis in detecting malignant pancreatic cysts at EUS-FNA and to determine whether DNA analysis added to imaging and cyst fluid studies enhanced International Association of Pancreatology (IAP) guidelines for resection of pancreatic cysts. METHODS: This is a retrospective study including pancreatic cysts undergoing EUS-FNA and DNA analysis with k-ras and loss of heterozygosity testing. Diagnostic models of 2006 and 2012 IAP guidelines, DNA analysis alone, and DNA combined with 2012 IAP guidelines were developed, and area under receiver operator characteristic curves (AUC) compared to determine the added value of DNA for detecting malignant cysts at the time of EUS-FNA. RESULTS: Two-hundreds and fifty-seven patients were included with 8 (3.1%) malignant cysts. Solid component (P<0.001), main pancreatic duct dilation (P=0.012), suspicious or malignant cytology (P=0.001), and high DNA quantity (P<0.001) were associated with malignancy. Concurrent high amplitude k-ras with loss of heterozygosity mutations was highly specific (98.4%) though insensitive (12.5%) for malignancy. The 2012 IAP guideline (AUC=0.87; 95% CI: 0.82-0.91) was superior to 2006 IAP guideline (AUC=0.54; 95% CI: 0.47-0.60) and DNA analysis alone (AUC=0.60; 95% CI: 0.53-0.66) for detecting malignant cysts (P=0.004 and P=0.002, respectively). Addition of DNA did not improve performance of the 2012 IAP guideline (AUC=0.84; 95% CI: 0.79-0.88). CONCLUSIONS: Commercial DNA analysis does not add useful information beyond imaging and cytology for detection of malignant pancreatic cysts. The 2012 IAP guideline better predicted malignant cysts than the 2006 IAP guideline.

6 Article Frequent detection of pancreatic lesions in asymptomatic high-risk individuals. 2012

Canto, Marcia Irene / Hruban, Ralph H / Fishman, Elliot K / Kamel, Ihab R / Schulick, Richard / Zhang, Zhe / Topazian, Mark / Takahashi, Naoki / Fletcher, Joel / Petersen, Gloria / Klein, Alison P / Axilbund, Jennifer / Griffin, Constance / Syngal, Sapna / Saltzman, John R / Mortele, Koenraad J / Lee, Jeffrey / Tamm, Eric / Vikram, Raghunandan / Bhosale, Priya / Margolis, Daniel / Farrell, James / Goggins, Michael / Anonymous3270715. ·Department of Medicine (Division of Gastroenterology), The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. mcanto@jhmi.edu ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #22245846.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: The risk of pancreatic cancer is increased in patients with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer or a predisposing germline mutation. Screening can detect curable, noninvasive pancreatic neoplasms, but the optimal imaging approach is not known. We determined the baseline prevalence and characteristics of pancreatic abnormalities using 3 imaging tests to screen asymptomatic, high-risk individuals (HRIs). METHODS: We screened 225 asymptomatic adult HRIs at 5 academic US medical centers once, using computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). We compared results in a blinded, independent fashion. RESULTS: Ninety-two of 216 HRIs (42%) were found to have at least 1 pancreatic mass (84 cystic, 3 solid) or a dilated pancreatic duct (n = 5) by any of the imaging modalities. Fifty-one of the 84 HRIs with a cyst (60.7%) had multiple lesions, typically small (mean, 0.55 cm; range, 2-39 mm), in multiple locations. The prevalence of pancreatic lesions increased with age; they were detected in 14% of subjects younger than 50 years old, 34% of subjects 50-59 years old, and 53% of subjects 60-69 years old (P < .0001). CT, MRI, and EUS detected a pancreatic abnormality in 11%, 33.3%, and 42.6% of the HRIs, respectively. Among these abnormalities, proven or suspected neoplasms were identified in 85 HRIs (82 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and 3 pancreatic endocrine tumors). Three of 5 HRIs who underwent pancreatic resection had high-grade dysplasia in less than 3 cm intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and in multiple intraepithelial neoplasias. CONCLUSIONS: Screening of asymptomatic HRIs frequently detects small pancreatic cysts, including curable, noninvasive high-grade neoplasms. EUS and MRI detect pancreatic lesions better than CT.