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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Emmanouil Saloustros
Based on 4 articles published since 2009
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Emmanouil Saloustros wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Prkar1a gene knockout in the pancreas leads to neuroendocrine tumorigenesis. 2017

Saloustros, Emmanouil / Salpea, Paraskevi / Starost, Matthew / Liu, Sissi / Faucz, Fabio R / London, Edra / Szarek, Eva / Song, Woo-Jin / Hussain, Mehboob / Stratakis, Constantine A. ·Section on Endocrinology and GeneticsProgram on Developmental Endocrinology & Genetics (PDEGEN) & Pediatric Endocrinology Inter-institute Training Program, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Diagnostic and Research Services BranchDivision of Veterinary Resources (DVR), Office of Research Services (ORS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of PediatricsMetabolism Division, John Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Section on Endocrinology and GeneticsProgram on Developmental Endocrinology & Genetics (PDEGEN) & Pediatric Endocrinology Inter-institute Training Program, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA stratakc@mail.nih.gov. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #27803029.

ABSTRACT: Carney complex (CNC) is a rare disease associated with multiple neoplasias, including a predisposition to pancreatic tumors; it is caused most frequently by the inactivation of the PRKAR1A gene, a regulator of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent kinase (PKA). The method used was to create null alleles of prkar1a in mouse cells expressing pdx1 (Δ-Prkar1a). We found that these mice developed endocrine or mixed endocrine/acinar cell carcinomas with 100% penetrance by the age of 4-5 months. Malignant behavior of the tumors was seen as evidenced by stromal invasion and metastasis to locoregional lymph nodes. Histologically, most tumors exhibited an organoid pattern as seen in the islet-cell tumors. Biochemically, the lesions exhibited high PKA activity, as one would expect from deleting prkar1a The primary neuroendocrine nature of these tumor cells was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy, the latter revealing the characteristic granules. Although the Δ-Prkar1a mice developed hypoglycemia after overnight fasting, insulin and glucagon levels in the plasma were normal. Negative immunohistochemical staining for the most commonly produced peptides (insulin, c-peptide, glucagon, gastrin and somatostatin) suggested that these tumors were non-functioning. We hypothesize that the recently identified multipotent pdx1+/insulin- cell in adult pancreas, gives rise to endocrine or mixed endocrine/acinar pancreatic malignancies with complete prkar1a deficiency. In conclusion, this mouse model supports the role of prkar1a as a tumor suppressor gene in the pancreas and points to the PKA pathway as a possible therapeutic target for these lesions.

2 Article Candidate DNA repair susceptibility genes identified by exome sequencing in high-risk pancreatic cancer. 2016

Smith, Alyssa L / Alirezaie, Najmeh / Connor, Ashton / Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle / Grant, Robert / Selander, Iris / Bascuñana, Claire / Borgida, Ayelet / Hall, Anita / Whelan, Thomas / Holter, Spring / McPherson, Treasa / Cleary, Sean / Petersen, Gloria M / Omeroglu, Atilla / Saloustros, Emmanouil / McPherson, John / Stein, Lincoln D / Foulkes, William D / Majewski, Jacek / Gallinger, Steven / Zogopoulos, George. ·Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Décarie Boulevard, Montreal, QC, Canada H4A 3J1; Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, 1160 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 1A3. · McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, 740 Dr. Penfield Avenue, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 0G1. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X5; MaRS Centre, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, 661 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 0A3. · MaRS Centre, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, 661 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 0A3. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X5. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X5; Zane Cohen Centre for Digestive Diseases, Mount Sinai Hospital, 60 Murray Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 3H7. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. · Department of Pathology, McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Décarie Boulevard, Montreal, QC, Canada H4A 3J1. · Department of Medical Oncology, Hereditary Cancer Clinic, University Hospital of Heraklion, Voutes, Heraklion 71110, Greece. · Program in Cancer Genetics, Departments of Oncology and Human Genetics, Sir Mortimer B. Davis-Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, 3755 Côte-Ste-Catherine Road, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1E2. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X5; MaRS Centre, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, 661 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 0A3; Zane Cohen Centre for Digestive Diseases, Mount Sinai Hospital, 60 Murray Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 3H7. Electronic address: steven.gallinger@uhn.ca. · Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Décarie Boulevard, Montreal, QC, Canada H4A 3J1; Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, 1160 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 1A3; Program in Cancer Genetics, Departments of Oncology and Human Genetics, Sir Mortimer B. Davis-Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, 3755 Côte-Ste-Catherine Road, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1E2. Electronic address: george.zogopoulos@mcgill.ca. ·Cancer Lett · Pubmed #26546047.

ABSTRACT: The genetic basis underlying the majority of hereditary pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) is unknown. Since DNA repair genes are widely implicated in gastrointestinal malignancies, including PC, we hypothesized that there are novel DNA repair PC susceptibility genes. As germline DNA repair gene mutations may lead to PC subtypes with selective therapeutic responses, we also hypothesized that there is an overall survival (OS) difference in mutation carriers versus non-carriers. We therefore interrogated the germline exomes of 109 high-risk PC cases for rare protein-truncating variants (PTVs) in 513 putative DNA repair genes. We identified PTVs in 41 novel genes among 36 kindred. Additional genetic evidence for causality was obtained for 17 genes, with FAN1, NEK1 and RHNO1 emerging as the strongest candidates. An OS difference was observed for carriers versus non-carriers of PTVs with early stage (≤IIB) disease. This adverse survival trend in carriers with early stage disease was also observed in an independent series of 130 PC cases. We identified candidate DNA repair PC susceptibility genes and suggest that carriers of a germline PTV in a DNA repair gene with early stage disease have worse survival.

3 Article Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish families with breast and pancreatic cancer. 2012

Stadler, Zsofia K / Salo-Mullen, Erin / Patil, Sujata M / Pietanza, M Catherine / Vijai, Joseph / Saloustros, Emmanouil / Hansen, Nichole A L / Kauff, Noah D / Kurtz, Robert C / Kelsen, David P / Offit, Kenneth / Robson, Mark E. ·Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. ·Cancer · Pubmed #21598239.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Germline mutations in the BRCA2 cancer susceptibility gene are associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (PC). Breast-pancreas cancer families with BRCA1 mutations have also been observed. The influence of a family history (FH) of PC on BRCA mutation prevalence in patients with breast cancer (BC) is unknown. METHODS: A clinical database review (2000-2009) identified 211 Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) BC probands who 1) underwent BRCA1/2 mutation analysis by full gene sequencing or directed testing for Ashkenazi founder mutations (BRCA1: 185delAG and 5382insC; BRCA2: 6174delT) and 2) had a FH of PC in a first-, second-, or third-degree relative. For each proband, the pretest probability of identifying a BRCA1/2 mutation was estimated using the Myriad II model. The observed-to-expected (O:E) mutation prevalence was calculated for the entire group. RESULTS: Of the 211 AJ BC probands with a FH of PC, 30 (14.2%) harbored a BRCA mutation. Fourteen (47%) of the mutations were in BRCA1 and 16 (53%) were in BRCA2. Patients diagnosed with BC at age ≤ 50 years were found to have a higher BRCA1/2 mutation prevalence than probands with BC who were diagnosed at age > 50 years (21.1% vs 6.9%; P = .003). In patients with a first-, second-, or third-degree relative with PC, mutation prevalences were 15.4%, 15.3%, and 8.6%, respectively (P = .58). In the overall group, the observed BRCA1/2 mutation prevalence was 14.2% versus an expected prevalence of 11.8% (O:E ratio, 1.21; P = .15). CONCLUSIONS: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are observed with nearly equal distribution in AJ breast-pancreas cancer families, suggesting that both genes are associated with PC risk. In this population, a FH of PC was found to have a limited effect on mutation prevalence.

4 Article Pancreatic ductal and acinar cell neoplasms in Carney complex: a possible new association. 2011

Gaujoux, Sébastien / Tissier, Frédérique / Ragazzon, Bruno / Rebours, Vinciane / Saloustros, Emmanouil / Perlemoine, Karine / Vincent-Dejean, Caroline / Meurette, Guillaume / Cassagnau, Elisabeth / Dousset, Bertrand / Bertagna, Xavier / Horvath, Anelia / Terris, Benoit / Carney, J Aidan / Stratakis, Constantine A / Bertherat, Jérôme. ·Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale–Unité 1016, France. ·J Clin Endocrinol Metab · Pubmed #21900385.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Carney complex (CNC) is a rare disease inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, associated with various tumors, and caused most frequently by inactivation of the PRKAR1A gene. OBJECTIVES: In our recent investigation of a large cohort of CNC patients, we identified several cases of pancreatic neoplasms. This possible association and PRKAR1A's possible involvement in pancreatic tumor have not been reported previously. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Nine patients (2.5%) with CNC and pancreatic neoplasms in an international cohort of 354 CNC patients were identified; we studied six of them. Immunohistochemistry and PRKAR1A sequencing were obtained. RESULTS: Three men and three women with a mean age of 49 yr (range 34-75 yr) had acinar cell carcinoma (n = 2), adenocarcinoma (n = 1), and intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasm (n = 3). Five patients had a germline PRKAR1A mutation, including two patients with acinar cell carcinoma, for whom mutations were found in a hemizygous state in the tumor, suggesting loss of heterozygosity. PRKAR1A expression was not detected in five of the six pancreatic neoplasms from CNC patients, whereas the protein was amply expressed on other sporadic pancreatic tumors and normal tissue. CONCLUSION: An unexpectedly high prevalence of rare pancreatic tumors was found among CNC patients. Immunohistochemistry and loss-of-heterozygosity studies suggest that PRKAR1A could function as a tumor suppressor gene in pancreatic tissue, at least in the context of CNC. Clinicians taking care of CNC patients should be aware of the possible association of CNC with a potentially aggressive pancreatic neoplasm.