Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Eran Sadot
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Eran Sadot wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review FOLFIRINOX for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and patient-level meta-analysis. 2016

Suker, Mustafa / Beumer, Berend R / Sadot, Eran / Marthey, Lysiane / Faris, Jason E / Mellon, Eric A / El-Rayes, Bassel F / Wang-Gillam, Andrea / Lacy, Jill / Hosein, Peter J / Moorcraft, Sing Yu / Conroy, Thierry / Hohla, Florian / Allen, Peter / Taieb, Julien / Hong, Theodore S / Shridhar, Ravi / Chau, Ian / van Eijck, Casper H / Koerkamp, Bas Groot. ·Department of Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Hepatogastroenterology, Antoine Beclère Hospital, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris Sud University, Clamart, France. · Department of Hematology-Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA. · Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Medicine, Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. · Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Kentucky-Markey Cancer Center, Lexington, KY, USA. · Department of Medicine, The Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, London and Surrey, UK. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine and Lorraine University, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France. · Department of Hematology, Medical Oncology, Hemostasis, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Paracelsus Medical University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria. · Department of Gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris Descartes University, Cancer Research Personalized Medicine (CARPEM), Paris, France. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Florida Hospital Cancer Institute, Orlando, FL, USA. · Department of Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Electronic address: b.grootkoerkamp@erasmusmc.nl. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #27160474.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: 35% of patients with pancreatic cancer have unresectable locally advanced disease at diagnosis. Several studies have examined systemic chemotherapy with FOLFIRINOX (leucovorin and fluorouracil plus irinotecan and oxaliplatin) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of FOLFIRINOX as first-line treatment in this patient population. METHODS: We systematically searched Embase, MEDLINE (OvidSP), Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed Publisher, Cochrane, and Google Scholar from July 1, 1994, to July 2, 2015, for studies of treatment-naive patients of any age who received FOLFIRINOX as first-line treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Our primary outcome was overall survival. Secondary outcomes were progression-free survival; rates of grade 3 or 4 adverse events; and the proportion of patients who underwent radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy, surgical resection after FOLFIRINOX, and R0 resection. We evaluated survival outcomes with the Kaplan-Meier method with patient-level data. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events, and the proportion of patients who underwent subsequent radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy or resection, were pooled in a random-effects model. FINDINGS: We included 13 studies comprising 689 patients, of whom 355 (52%) patients had locally advanced pancreatic cancer. 11 studies, comprising 315 patients with locally advanced disease, reported survival outcomes and were eligible for patient-level meta-analysis. Median overall survival from the start of FOLFIRINOX ranged from 10·0 months (95% CI 4·0-16·0) to 32·7 months (23·1-42·3) across studies with a pooled patient-level median overall survival of 24·2 months (95% CI 21·7-26·8). Median progression-free survival ranged from 3·0 months (95% CI not calculable) to 20·4 months (6·5-34·3) across studies with a patient-level median progression-free survival of 15·0 months (95% 13·8-16·2). In ten studies comprising 490 patients, 296 grade 3 or 4 adverse events were reported (60·4 events per 100 patients). No deaths were attributed to FOLFIRINOX toxicity. The proportion of patients who underwent radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy ranged from 31% to 100% across studies. In eight studies, 154 (57%) of 271 patients received radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy after FOLFIRINOX. The pooled proportion of patients who received any radiotherapy treatment was 63·5% (95% CI 43·3-81·6, I(2) 90%). The proportion of patients who underwent surgical resection for locally advanced pancreatic cancer ranged from 0% to 43%. The proportion of patients who had R0 resection of those who underwent resection ranged from 50% to 100% across studies. In 12 studies, 91 (28%) of 325 patients underwent resection after FOLFIRINOX. The pooled proportion of patients who had resection was 25·9% (95% CI 20·2-31·9, I(2) 24%). R0 resection was reported in 60 (74%) of 81 patients. The pooled proportion of patients who had R0 resection was 78·4% (95% CI 60·2-92·2, I(2) 64%). INTERPRETATION: Patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with FOLFIRINOX had a median overall survival of 24·2 months-longer than that reported with gemcitabine (6-13 months). Future research should assess these promising results in a randomised controlled trial, and should establish which patients might benefit from radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy or resection after FOLFIRINOX. FUNDING: None.

2 Article Observation versus Resection for Small Asymptomatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Matched Case-Control Study. 2016

Sadot, Eran / Reidy-Lagunes, Diane L / Tang, Laura H / Do, Richard Kinh Gian / Gonen, Mithat / D'Angelica, Michael I / DeMatteo, Ronald P / Kingham, T Peter / Groot Koerkamp, Bas / Untch, Brian R / Brennan, Murray F / Jarnagin, William R / Allen, Peter J. ·Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. allenp@mskcc.org. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #26597365.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To analyze the natural history of small asymptomatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) and to present a matched comparison between groups who underwent either initial observation or resection. Management approach for small PanNET is uncertain. METHODS: Incidentally discovered, sporadic, small (<3 cm), stage I-II PanNET were analyzed retrospectively between 1993 and 2013. Diagnosis was determined either by pathology or imaging characteristics. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied. RESULTS: A total of 464 patients were reviewed. Observation was recommended for 104 patients (observation group), and these patients were matched to 77 patients in the resection group based on tumor size at initial imaging. The observation group was significantly older (median 63 vs. 59 years, p = 0.04) and tended towards shorter follow-up (44 vs. 57 months, p = 0.06). Within the observation group, 26 of the 104 patients (25 %) underwent subsequent tumor resection after a median observation interval of 30 months (range 7-135). At the time of last follow-up of the observation group, the median tumor size had not changed (1.2 cm, p = 0.7), and no patient had developed evidence of metastases. Within the resection group, low-grade (G1) pathology was recorded in 72 (95 %) tumors and 5 (6 %) developed a recurrence, which occurred after a median of 5.1 (range 2.9-8.1) years. No patient in either group died from disease. Death from other causes occurred in 11 of 181 (6 %) patients. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, no patient who was initially observed developed metastases or died from disease after a median follow-up of 44 months. Observation for stable, small, incidentally discovered PanNET is reasonable in selected patients.

3 Article FOLFIRINOX Induction Therapy for Stage 3 Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma. 2015

Sadot, Eran / Doussot, Alexandre / O'Reilly, Eileen M / Lowery, Maeve A / Goodman, Karyn A / Do, Richard Kinh Gian / Tang, Laura H / Gönen, Mithat / D'Angelica, Michael I / DeMatteo, Ronald P / Kingham, T Peter / Jarnagin, William R / Allen, Peter J. ·Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. allenp@mskcc.org. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #26065868.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Reports show that FOLFIRINOX therapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) results in objective response rates two to threefold higher than those of other regimens. This study aimed to assess response and resection rates for locally unresectable (stage 3) patients initially treated with induction FOLFIRINOX. METHODS: The institutional cancer database was queried for patients treated with induction FOLFIRINOX therapy between 2010 and 2013. Patients were included in the study if they were treated at the authors' institution for stage 3 PDAC (locally unresectable) that had been adjudicated at a weekly multidisciplinary tumor board. RESULTS: The study identified 101 patients. The median age was 64 years (range 37-81 years), and the median follow-up period was 12 months (range 3-37 months). The patients received a median of six cycles (range 1-20 cycles) of induction FOLFIRINOX. No grade 4 or 5 toxicity was recorded. At the initial restaging (median of 3 months after diagnosis), 23 patients (23 %) had developed distant metastases, 15 patients (15 %) had undergone resection, and 63 patients (63 %) had proceeded to chemoradiation. In the group of 63 patients who had proceeded to chemoradiation (median of 9 months after diagnosis), an additional 16 patients (16 %) had undergone resection, and 5 patients (5 %) had developed metastases. A partial radiographic response was observed in 29 % of all the patients, which was associated with ability to perform resection (p = 0.004). The median overall survival time was 11 months for the group that progressed with FOLFIRINOX and 26 months for the group that did not progress. CONCLUSION: Nearly one third of the patients who had been initially identified as having stage 3 pancreatic carcinoma and had been treated with FOLFIRINOX responded radiographically and underwent tumor resection.

4 Article Tumor-associated Neutrophils and Malignant Progression in Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms: An Opportunity for Identification of High-risk Disease. 2015

Sadot, Eran / Basturk, Olca / Klimstra, David S / Gönen, Mithat / Lokshin, Anna / Do, Richard Kinh Gian / D'Angelica, Michael I / DeMatteo, Ronald P / Kingham, T Peter / Jarnagin, William R / Allen, Peter J. ·*Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY †Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY ‡Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY §Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA ¶Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #25563865.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the association of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) with malignant progression in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) and to study the cyst fluid from these lesions for biomarkers of the inflammation-carcinogenesis association. BACKGROUND: There is a strong link between TANs and malignant progression. Inflammatory mediators released by these cells may be a measurable surrogate marker of this progression. METHODS: We evaluated 78 resected IPMNs (2004-2013). Lesions were divided into the low-risk (low- and intermediate-grade dysplasia: n = 48) and high-risk (high-grade dysplasia and invasive carcinoma: n = 30) groups. TANs were assessed and categorized (negative, low, and high). A multiplexed assay was performed to evaluate 87 different cyst fluid proteins, including cyst fluid inflammatory markers (CFIMs), as possible surrogate markers for parenchymal inflammation. RESULTS: Significant positive correlation between grade of dysplasia and TANs was found. High levels of TANs were identified in 2%, 33%, and 89% of the lesions when stratified by grade of dysplasia into low/intermediate-grade dysplasia, high-grade dysplasia, and invasive carcinoma, respectively (P < 0.001). Higher grades of dysplasia were also found to have positive correlation with 29 of the measured proteins, of which 23 (79%) were CFIMs. Higher levels of TANs correlated with higher levels of 18 CFIMs, of which 16 (89%) were also found to be associated with higher grades of dysplasia. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, TANs were strongly associated with malignant progression in IPMNs. Measurement of CFIMs may be a surrogate marker for IPMN progression and allow for the identification of high-risk disease.

5 Article Distal pancreatectomy: a single institution's experience in open, laparoscopic, and robotic approaches. 2015

Lee, Ser Yee / Allen, Peter J / Sadot, Eran / D'Angelica, Michael I / DeMatteo, Ronald P / Fong, Yuman / Jarnagin, William R / Kingham, T Peter. ·Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. Electronic address: kinghamt@mskcc.org. ·J Am Coll Surg · Pubmed #25456783.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The indications for minimally invasive (MIS) pancreatectomy have slowly increased as experience, techniques, and technology have improved and evolved to manage malignant lesions in selected patients without compromising safety and oncologic principles. There are sparse data comparing laparoscopic, robotic, and open distal pancreatectomy (DP). STUDY DESIGN: All patients undergoing DP at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center between 2000 and 2013 were analyzed from a prospective database. Clinicopathologic and survival data were analyzed to compare perioperative and oncologic outcomes in patients who underwent DP via open, laparoscopic, and robotic approaches. RESULTS: Eight hundred five DP were performed during the study period, comprising 37 robotic distal pancreatectomies (RDP), 131 laparoscopic distal pancreatectomies (LDP), and 637 open distal pancreatectomies (ODP). The 3 groups were similar with respect to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, sex ratio, body mass index, pancreatic fistula rate, and 90-day morbidity and mortality. Patients in the ODP group were generally older (p = 0.001), had significantly higher intraoperative blood loss (p < 0.001), and had a trend toward a longer hospital stay (p = 0.05). Of the significant preoperative variables, visceral fat was predictive of conversion on multivariate analysis (p = 0.003). Oncologic outcomes in the adenocarcinoma cases were similar for the 3 groups, with high rates of R0 resection (88% to 100%). The ODP group had a higher lymph node yield than the LDP and RDP groups (15.4, [SD 8.7] vs 10.4 [SD 8.0] vs 12[SD 7.2], p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: The RDP and LDP were comparable with respect to most perioperative outcomes, with no clear advantage of one approach over the other. Both of these MIS techniques may have advantages over ODP in well-selected patients. All approaches achieved a similarly high rate of R0 resection for patients with adenocarcinoma.

6 Article Clinical features and outcome of primary pancreatic lymphoma. 2015

Sadot, Eran / Yahalom, Joachim / Do, Richard Kinh Gian / Teruya-Feldstein, Julie / Allen, Peter J / Gönen, Mithat / D'Angelica, Michael I / Kingham, T Peter / Jarnagin, William R / DeMatteo, Ronald P. ·Department of Surgery, Hepatopancreatobiliary Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #25341750.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Primary pancreatic lymphoma (PPL) is a rare tumor that is often misdiagnosed. Clinicopathologic features, optimal therapy, and outcomes are not well defined. We reviewed our institutional experience with PPL. METHODS: Search of our institutional database identified that between 1987-2012, 21,760 patients with lymphoma and 11,286 patients with a primary pancreatic tumor were evaluated. There were 44 patients with pathologically confirmed PPL. Clinical data were obtained by chart review and survival distributions were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. RESULTS: At baseline, LDH was elevated in 55 % of the patients, CA 19-9 in 25 %, and CEA in 20 %. Imaging characteristics included large, unresectable tumors (67 %), and lymphadenopathy inferior to the renal vein (50 %). Twenty-three patients underwent surgery for resection (5), diagnosis (13), or palliation (5). Chemotherapy alone achieved a 75 % complete response rate. Eight patients experienced relapse, 88 % of which occurred at distant sites. Median overall survival was 6.1 years and 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 69 %. Patients with a low risk International Prognostic Index (IPI) and those with a follicular histologic subtype demonstrated 5-year DSS of 100 %. CONCLUSIONS: Chemotherapy for PPL results in a high complete response rate and long DSS, which is similar to nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). A favorable outcome is expected for IPI low risk patients and follicular histologic subtype. Systemic therapy should generally be the initial therapy when the diagnosis is known. Prolonged follow up is recommended to detect relapses. Surgery alone should be reserved for non-curative intent (i.e. diagnostic or palliative).

7 Article Readmission after pancreatic resection: causes and causality pattern. 2014

Sadot, Eran / Brennan, Murray F / Lee, Ser Yee / Allen, Peter J / Gönen, Mithat / Groeger, Jeffery S / Peter Kingham, T / D'Angelica, Michael I / DeMatteo, Ronald P / Jarnagin, William R / Fong, Yuman. ·Department of Surgery, Hepatopancreatobiliary Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #25047467.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Readmission rates have been targeted for cost/reimbursement control. Our goal was to identify causes for readmission and delineate the pattern of early and late readmission. METHODS: Between 2011 and 2012, a total of 490 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy, distal pancreatectomy or central pancreatectomy. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of readmission. K-medoids clustering was performed to identify the major readmission subgroups. RESULTS: Median postoperative length of stay (LOS) was 7 days, and the 30- and 90-day readmission rates were 23 and 29 %, respectively. The most common cause for 30-day readmissions was procedure-related infections (58 %), while the most common cause for 31-90-day readmissions was failure to thrive and chemotherapy-related symptoms (38 %). Independent predictors of 30-day readmissions were central pancreatectomy, discharge with a drain, pancreatic duct <3 mm, previous abdominal surgery, and postoperative LOS. Independent predictors for 31-90-day readmissions were age and preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen. Cancer-related covariates were more common in the 31-90-day readmission group. Postoperative carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels were twofold higher in the 31-90-day readmission group compared with the no readmission group (p = 0.03). K-medoids clustering identified a subgroup where 74 % of readmissions occur at a median of 7 days after discharge. CONCLUSIONS: Readmissions after pancreatic operations are procedure-related in the first 30 days, but those after this period are influenced by the natural history of the underlying diagnosis. The readmission penalty policy should account for the timing of readmission and the natural history of the underlying disease and procedure. Early follow-up for patients at high risk for readmission may minimize early readmissions.