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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Carlotta Sacerdote
Based on 9 articles published since 2010
(Why 9 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, C. Sacerdote wrote the following 9 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Autoantibodies to Ezrin are an early sign of pancreatic cancer in humans and in genetically engineered mouse models. 2013

Capello, Michela / Cappello, Paola / Linty, Federica Caterina / Chiarle, Roberto / Sperduti, Isabella / Novarino, Anna / Salacone, Paola / Mandili, Giorgia / Naccarati, Alessio / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Beghelli, Stefania / Bersani, Samantha / Barbi, Stefano / Bassi, Claudio / Scarpa, Aldo / Nisticò, Paola / Giovarelli, Mirella / Vineis, Paolo / Milella, Michele / Novelli, Francesco. ·Center for Experimental Research and Medical Studies (CeRMS), Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Turin, Italy. franco.novelli@unito.it. ·J Hematol Oncol · Pubmed #24010981.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy with only a 5% 5-year survival rate. Reliable biomarkers for early detection are still lacking. The goals of this study were (a) to identify early humoral responses in genetically engineered mice (GEM) spontaneously developing PDAC; and (b) to test their diagnostic/predictive value in newly diagnosed PDAC patients and in prediagnostic sera. METHODS AND RESULTS: The serum reactivity of GEM from inception to invasive cancer, and in resectable or advanced human PDAC was tested by two-dimensional electrophoresis Western blot against proteins from murine and human PDAC cell lines, respectively. A common mouse-to-human autoantibody signature, directed against six antigens identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, was determined. Of the six antigens, Ezrin displayed the highest frequency of autoantibodies in GEM with early disease and in PDAC patients with resectable disease. The diagnostic value of Ezrin-autoantibodies to discriminate PDAC from controls was further shown by ELISA and ROC analyses (P < 0.0001). This observation was confirmed in prediagnostic sera from the EPIC prospective study in patients who eventually developed PDAC (with a mean time lag of 61.2 months between blood drawing and PDAC diagnosis). A combination of Ezrin-autoantibodies with CA19.9 serum levels and phosphorylated α-Enolase autoantibodies showed an overall diagnostic accuracy of 0.96 ± 0.02. CONCLUSIONS: Autoantibodies against Ezrin are induced early in PDAC and their combination with other serological markers may provide a predictive and diagnostic signature.

2 Article Healthy lifestyle and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the EPIC study. 2019

Naudin, Sabine / Viallon, Vivian / Hashim, Dana / Freisling, Heinz / Jenab, Mazda / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Perrier, Flavie / McKenzie, Fiona / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Olsen, Anja / Tjønneland, Anne / Dahm, Christina C / Overvad, Kim / Mancini, Francesca R / Rebours, Vinciane / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Katzke, Verena / Kaaks, Rudolf / Bergmann, Manuela / Boeing, Heiner / Peppa, Eleni / Karakatsani, Anna / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Pala, Valeria / Masala, Giovana / Panico, Salvatore / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / May, Anne M / van Gils, Carla H / Rylander, Charlotta / Borch, Kristin Benjaminsen / Chirlaque López, María Dolores / Sánchez, Maria-Jose / Ardanaz, Eva / Quirós, José Ramón / Amiano Exezarreta, Pilar / Sund, Malin / Drake, Isabel / Regnér, Sara / Travis, Ruth C / Wareham, Nick / Aune, Dagfinn / Riboli, Elio / Gunter, Marc J / Duell, Eric J / Brennan, Paul / Ferrari, Pietro. ·Nutritional Methodology and Biostatistics Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, 150, Cours Albert Thomas, 69372, Lyon Cedex 08, France. · Department of Hematology and Oncology, Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Nutritional Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France. · Director Office, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France. · Environment and Radiation section, Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France. · Departement for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (Former), National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepathology, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. · CESP, Faculté de médecine (USVQ), Université Paris-Sud, INSERM, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France. · Inserm UMR1018, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Pancreatology Department, Beaujon Hospital, AP-HP, Clichy, France. · Inserm UMR1149, DHU Unit, Paris-Diderot University, Paris, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Pulmonary Medicine Department, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, ATTIKON University Hospital of Athens, Haidari, Greece. · School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy. · Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research, Prevention and Clinical Network - ISPRO, Florence, Italy. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medecine, University Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, Civic M.P.Arezzo Hospital, Ragusa, Italy. · Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Città della Salute e della Scienza University, Hospital and Center for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Turin, Italy. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia University, Murcia, Spain. · Spanish Consortium for Research and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria, Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain. · Department of Surgical and Preoperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Department of Nutrition, Bjørknes University College, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Endocrinology, Morbid Obesity and Preventive Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France. · Nutritional Methodology and Biostatistics Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, 150, Cours Albert Thomas, 69372, Lyon Cedex 08, France. ferrarip@iarc.fr. ·Eur J Epidemiol · Pubmed #31564045.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly fatal cancer with currently limited opportunities for early detection and effective treatment. Modifiable factors may offer pathways for primary prevention. In this study, the association between the Healthy Lifestyle Index (HLI) and PC risk was examined. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, 1113 incident PC (57% women) were diagnosed from 400,577 participants followed-up for 15 years (median). HLI scores combined smoking, alcohol intake, dietary exposure, physical activity and, in turn, overall and central adiposity using BMI (HLI

3 Article Circulating plasma phospholipid fatty acids and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large European cohort. 2018

Matejcic, M / Lesueur, F / Biessy, C / Renault, A L / Mebirouk, N / Yammine, S / Keski-Rahkonen, P / Li, K / Hémon, B / Weiderpass, E / Rebours, V / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Carbonnel, F / Kaaks, R / Katzke, V / Kuhn, T / Boeing, H / Trichopoulou, A / Palli, D / Agnoli, C / Panico, S / Tumino, R / Sacerdote, C / Quirós, J R / Duell, E J / Porta, M / Sánchez, M J / Chirlaque, M D / Barricarte, A / Amiano, P / Ye, W / Peeters, P H / Khaw, K T / Perez-Cornago, A / Key, T J / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Riboli, E / Vineis, P / Romieu, I / Gunter, M J / Chajès, V. ·International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Genetic Epidemiology of Cancer team, Inserm, U900, Paris, France. · Institut Curie, Paris, France. · PSL University, Paris, France. · Mines ParisTech, Fontainebleau, France. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research institute, San Sebastian, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, University Paris 7, Clichy, France. · INSERM, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Health across Generations Team, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Université Paris Sud, UMRS, Villejuif, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, Bicêtre University Hospital, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE), Nuthetal, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute - ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Clinical Medicine and Surgery Department, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, ASP, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, Ragusa, Italy. · Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Citta' della Salute e della Scienza Hospital, University of Turin and Centre for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Turin, Italy. · EPIC Asturias, Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital del Mar Research Institute - IMIM, CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) and Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública. Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA. Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain. · CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Department of Health and Social Sciences, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), Pamplona, Spain. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · MRC-PHE Center for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30110135.

ABSTRACT: There are both limited and conflicting data on the role of dietary fat and specific fatty acids in the development of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we investigated the association between plasma phospholipid fatty acids and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The fatty acid composition was measured by gas chromatography in plasma samples collected at recruitment from375 incident pancreatic cancer cases and375 matched controls. Associations of specific fatty acids with pancreatic cancer risk were evaluated using multivariable conditional logistic regression models with adjustment for established pancreatic cancer risk factors. Statistically significant inverse associations were found between pancreatic cancer incidence and levels of heptadecanoic acid (OR

4 Article Lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. 2018

Naudin, Sabine / Li, Kuanrong / Jaouen, Tristan / Assi, Nada / Kyrø, Cecilie / Tjønneland, Anne / Overvad, Kim / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Rebours, Vinciane / Védié, Anne-Laure / Boeing, Heiner / Kaaks, Rudolf / Katzke, Verena / Bamia, Christina / Naska, Androniki / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Berrino, Franco / Tagliabue, Giovanna / Palli, Domenico / Panico, Salvatore / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Peeters, Petra H / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Gram, Inger Torhild / Skeie, Guri / Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores / Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel / Barricarte, Aurelio / Quirós, Jose Ramón / Dorronsoro, Miren / Johansson, Ingegerd / Sund, Malin / Sternby, Hanna / Bradbury, Kathryn E / Wareham, Nick / Riboli, Elio / Gunter, Marc / Brennan, Paul / Duell, Eric J / Ferrari, Pietro. ·Nutritional Methodology and Biostatistics Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · CESP, INSERM U1018, University of Paris-Sud, UVSQ, University of Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France. · Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Pancreatology Unit, Beaujon Hospital, Clichy, France. · INSERM U1149, University Paris 7, Paris, France. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE), Potsdam, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Preventive & Predictive Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Lombardy Cancer Registry Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute (ISPO), Florence, Italy. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, Civic M.P.Arezzo Hospital, Ragusa, Italy, Ragusa, Italy. · Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Hospital and Center for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Città della Salute e della Scienza University, Turin, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala, Malaysia, Lumpur. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Department of Health and Social Sciences, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Biosanitary Investigation Institute (IBS) of Granada, University Hospital and University of Granada, Granada, Spain. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Subdirección de Salud Pública de Gipuzkoa, Gobierno Vasco, San Sebastian, Spain. · Department of Odontology, Cariology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Surgery, Institution of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Nutrition and Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-Idibell), Barcelona, Spain. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #29524225.

ABSTRACT: Recent evidence suggested a weak relationship between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer (PC) risk. In our study, the association between lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and the risk of PC was evaluated, including the type of alcoholic beverages and potential interaction with smoking. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, 1,283 incident PC (57% women) were diagnosed from 476,106 cancer-free participants, followed up for 14 years. Amounts of lifetime and baseline alcohol were estimated through lifestyle and dietary questionnaires, respectively. Cox proportional hazard models with age as primary time variable were used to estimate PC hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence interval (CI). Alcohol intake was positively associated with PC risk in men. Associations were mainly driven by extreme alcohol levels, with HRs comparing heavy drinkers (>60 g/day) to the reference category (0.1-4.9 g/day) equal to 1.77 (95% CI: 1.06, 2.95) and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.16, 2.29) for lifetime and baseline alcohol, respectively. Baseline alcohol intakes from beer (>40 g/day) and spirits/liquors (>10 g/day) showed HRs equal to 1.58 (95% CI: 1.07, 2.34) and 1.41 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.94), respectively, compared to the reference category (0.1-2.9 g/day). In women, HR estimates did not reach statistically significance. The alcohol and PC risk association was not modified by smoking status. Findings from a large prospective study suggest that baseline and lifetime alcohol intakes were positively associated with PC risk, with more apparent risk estimates for beer and spirits/liquors than wine intake.

5 Article Mediterranean diet and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. 2017

Molina-Montes, Esther / Sánchez, María-José / Buckland, Genevieve / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Amiano, Pilar / Wark, Petra A / Kühn, Tilman / Katzke, Verena / Huerta, José María / Ardanaz, Eva / Quirós, José Ramón / Affret, Aurélie / His, Mathilde / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Peeters, Petra H / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Boeing, Heiner / Iqbal, Khalid / Ohlsson, Bodil / Sonestedt, Emily / Tjønneland, Anne / Petersen, Kristina En / Travis, Ruth C / Skeie, Guri / Agnoli, Claudia / Panico, Salvatore / Palli, Domenico / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Freisling, Heinz / Huybrechts, Inge / Overvad, Kim / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Bamia, Christina / Vasilopoulou, Effie / Wareham, Nick / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Cross, Amanda J / Ward, Heather A / Riboli, Elio / Duell, Eric J. ·Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · Andalusian School of Public Health, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA. Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastián, Spain. · Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DFKZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Université Paris-Saclay, Université Paris-Sud, UVSQ, CESP Generations and Health Team, INSERM, Villejuif, France. · Gustave Roussy, Villejuif F-94805, France. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, 'Civic-M.P.Arezzo' Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Ragusa, Italy. · Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Citta' della Salute e della Scienza Hospital, University of Turin and Centre for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Turin, Italy. · Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France. · Department of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · Medical Research Council (MCR), Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge, UK. · University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #28170373.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The Mediterranean diet (MD) has been proposed as a means for cancer prevention, but little evidence has been accrued regarding its potential to prevent pancreatic cancer. We investigated the association between the adherence to the MD and pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. METHODS: Over half a million participants from 10 European countries were followed up for over 11 years, after which 865 newly diagnosed exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were identified. Adherence to the MD was estimated through an adapted score without the alcohol component (arMED) to discount alcohol-related harmful effects. Cox proportional hazards regression models, stratified by age, sex and centre, and adjusted for energy intake, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake and diabetes status at recruitment, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) associated with pancreatic cancer and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Adherence to the arMED score was not associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (HR high vs low adherence=0.99; 95% CI: 0.77-1.26, and HR per increments of two units in adherence to arMED=1.00; 95% CI: 0.94-1.06). There was no convincing evidence for heterogeneity by smoking status, body mass index, diabetes or European region. There was also no evidence of significant associations in analyses involving microscopically confirmed cases, plausible reporters of energy intake or other definitions of the MD pattern. CONCLUSIONS: A high adherence to the MD is not associated with pancreatic cancer risk in the EPIC study.

6 Article Plasma antibodies to oral bacteria and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large European prospective cohort study. 2013

Michaud, Dominique S / Izard, Jacques / Wilhelm-Benartzi, Charlotte S / You, Doo-Ho / Grote, Verena A / Tjønneland, Anne / Dahm, Christina C / Overvad, Kim / Jenab, Mazda / Fedirko, Veronika / Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Racine, Antoine / Kaaks, Rudolf / Boeing, Heiner / Foerster, Jana / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Lagiou, Pagona / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Sieri, Sabina / Palli, Domenico / Tumino, Rosario / Panico, Salvatore / Siersema, Peter D / Peeters, Petra H M / Lund, Eiliv / Barricarte, Aurelio / Huerta, José-María / Molina-Montes, Esther / Dorronsoro, Miren / Quirós, J Ramón / Duell, Eric J / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Lindkvist, Björn / Johansen, Dorthe / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Travis, Ruth C / Vineis, Paolo / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Riboli, Elio. ·Department of Epidemiology, Division of Biology and Medicine, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #22990306.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Examine the relationship between antibodies to 25 oral bacteria and pancreatic cancer risk in a prospective cohort study. DESIGN: We measured antibodies to oral bacteria in prediagnosis blood samples from 405 pancreatic cancer cases and 416 matched controls, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Analyses were conducted using conditional logistic regression and additionally adjusted for smoking status and body mass index. RESULTS: Individuals with high levels of antibodies against Porphyromonas gingivalis ATTC 53978, a pathogenic periodontal bacteria, had a twofold higher risk of pancreatic cancer than individuals with lower levels of these antibodies (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.05 to 4.36; >200 ng/ml vs ≤200 ng/ml). To explore the association with commensal (non-pathogenic) oral bacteria, we performed a cluster analysis and identified two groups of individuals, based on their antibody profiles. A cluster with overall higher levels of antibodies had a 45% lower risk of pancreatic cancer than a cluster with overall lower levels of antibodies (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.36 to 0.83). CONCLUSIONS: Periodontal disease might increase the risk for pancreatic cancer. Moreover, increased levels of antibodies against specific commensal oral bacteria, which can inhibit growth of pathogenic bacteria, might reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Studies are needed to determine whether oral bacteria have direct effects on pancreatic cancer pathogenesis or serve as markers of the immune response.

7 Article Plasma cotinine levels and pancreatic cancer in the EPIC cohort study. 2012

Leenders, Max / Chuang, Shu-Chun / Dahm, Christina C / Overvad, Kim / Ueland, Per Magne / Midttun, Oivind / Vollset, Stein Emil / Tjønneland, Anne / Halkjaer, Jytte / Jenab, Mazda / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Kaaks, Rudolf / Canzian, Federico / Boeing, Heiner / Weikert, Cornelia / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Bamia, Christina / Naska, Androniki / Palli, Domenico / Pala, Valeria / Mattiello, Amalia / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B / Peeters, Petra H M / van Gils, Carla H / Lund, Eiliv / Rodriguez, Laudina / Duell, Eric J / Pérez, María-José Sánchez / Molina-Montes, Esther / Castaño, José María Huerta / Barricarte, Aurelio / Larrañaga, Nerea / Johansen, Dorthe / Lindkvist, Björn / Sund, Malin / Ye, Weimin / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nicholas J / Michaud, Dominique S / Riboli, Elio / Xun, Wei W / Allen, Naomi E / Crowe, Francesca L / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Vineis, Paolo. ·School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. m.leenders-6@umcutrecht.nl ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #21953524.

ABSTRACT: Smoking is an established risk factor for pancreatic cancer, previously investigated by the means of questionnaires. Using cotinine as a biomarker for tobacco exposure allows more accurate quantitative analyses to be performed. This study on pancreatic cancer, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC cohort), included 146 cases and 146 matched controls. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, plasma cotinine levels were analyzed on average 8.0 years before cancer onset (5-95% range: 2.8-12.0 years). The relation between plasma cotinine levels and pancreatic cancer was analyzed with conditional logistic regression for different levels of cotinine in a population of never and current smokers. This was also done for the self-reported number of smoked cigarettes per day at baseline. Every increase of 350 nmol/L of plasma cotinine was found to significantly elevate risk of pancreatic cancer [odds ratio (OR): 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.60]. People with a cotinine level over 1187.8 nmol/L, a level comparable to smoking 17 cigarettes per day, have an elevated risk of pancreatic cancer, compared to people with cotinine levels below 55 nmol/L (OR: 3.66, 95% CI: 1.44-9.26). The results for self-reported smoking at baseline also show an increased risk of pancreatic cancer from cigarette smoking based on questionnaire information. People who smoke more than 30 cigarettes per day showed the highest risk compared to never smokers (OR: 4.15, 95% CI: 1.02-16.42). This study is the first to show that plasma cotinine levels are strongly related to pancreatic cancer.

8 Article A U-shaped relationship between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2011

Chuang, Shu-Chun / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Ueland, Per Magne / Vollset, Stein Emil / Midttun, Øivind / Olsen, Anja / Tjønneland, Anne / Overvad, Kim / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Morois, Sophie / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Teucher, Birgit / Kaaks, Rudolf / Weikert, Cornelia / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Benetou, Vassiliki / Naska, Androniki / Jenab, Mazda / Slimani, Nadia / Romieu, Isabelle / Michaud, Dominique S / Palli, Domenico / Sieri, Sabina / Panico, Salvatore / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Tumino, Rosario / Skeie, Guri / Duell, Eric J / Rodriguez, Laudina / Molina-Montes, Esther / Huerta, José Marı A / Larrañaga, Nerea / Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte / Johansen, Dorthe / Manjer, Jonas / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Peeters, Petra H M / Jeurnink, Suzanne / Wareham, Nicholas / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Crowe, Francesca / Riboli, Elio / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Vineis, Paolo. ·School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #21411310.

ABSTRACT: Folate intake has shown an inverse association with pancreatic cancer; nevertheless, results from plasma measurements were inconsistent. The aim of this study is to examine the association between plasma total homocysteine, methionine, folate, cobalamin, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We conducted a nested case-control study in the EPIC cohort, which has an average of 9.6 years of follow-up (1992-2006), using 463 incident pancreatic cancer cases. Controls were matched to each case by center, sex, age (± 1 year), date (± 1 year) and time (± 3 h) at blood collection and fasting status. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for education, smoking status, plasma cotinine concentration, alcohol drinking, body mass index and diabetes status. We observed a U-shaped association between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk. The ORs for plasma folate ≤ 5, 5-10, 10-15 (reference), 15-20, and > 20 nmol/L were 1.58 (95% CI=0.72-3.46), 1.39 (0.93-2.08), 1.0 (reference), 0.79 (0.52-1.21), and 1.34 (0.89-2.02), respectively. Methionine was associated with an increased risk in men (per quintile increment: OR=1.17, 95% CI=1.00-1.38) but not in women (OR=0.91, 95% CI=0.78-1.07; p for heterogeneity <0.01). Our results suggest a U-shaped association between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk in both men and women. The positive association that we observed between methionine and pancreatic cancer may be sex dependent and may differ by time of follow-up. However, the mechanisms behind the observed associations warrant further investigation.

9 Article Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in childhood and incidence of cancer in adulthood in never smokers in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2011

Chuang, Shu-Chun / Gallo, Valentina / Michaud, Dominique / Overvad, Kim / Tjønneland, Anne / Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise / Romieu, Isabelle / Straif, Kurt / Palli, Domenico / Pala, Valeria / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Panico, Salvatore / Peeters, Petra H / Lund, Eiliv / Gram, Inger Torhild / Manjer, Jonas / Borgquist, Signe / Riboli, Elio / Vineis, Paolo. ·School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, W2 1PG, London, UK. s-c.chuang@imperial.ac.uk ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #21279734.

ABSTRACT: The association between childhood environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure and adult cancer risk is controversial; we examined this relationship in never smokers within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Over an average of 10 years, 8,372 cases of cancer were diagnosed in 112,430 never smokers in EPIC. Childhood ETS was self-reported by participants at baseline, along with other lifestyle factors. Hazard ratios (HR) for ETS exposure in childhood and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards models stratified by age, sex, and study center and adjusted for education, alcohol drinking, body mass index, physical activity, non-alcoholic energy intake, fruit and vegetable intake, and adulthood ETS exposure. Models were further adjusted for reproductive factors for female cancers, for meat intake for digestive system cancers, and for diabetes status for pancreatic cancer. No association was observed between childhood ETS exposure and overall cancer risks (HR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.92-1.02), and for selected sites. The only exception was pancreatic cancer, as previously reported by Vrieling et al., among those who had been exposed daily in childhood (overall HR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.14-3.84). In conclusion, childhood ETS exposure might not be a major risk factor for common cancers in adulthood.