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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by David P. Ryan
Based on 34 articles published since 2010
(Why 34 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, D. P. Ryan wrote the following 34 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Editorial Predicting a response to FOLFIRINOX in pancreatic cancer. 2015

Nipp, Ryan D / Ryan, David P. ·Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center rnipp@partners.org. · Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #26025325.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Review Pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2014

Ryan, David P / Hong, Theodore S / Bardeesy, Nabeel. ·From the Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine (D.P.R., N.B.), and the Department of Radiation Oncology (T.S.H.), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #25207767.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Clinical Trial Total Neoadjuvant Therapy With FOLFIRINOX in Combination With Losartan Followed by Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Phase 2 Clinical Trial. 2019

Murphy, Janet E / Wo, Jennifer Y / Ryan, David P / Clark, Jeffrey W / Jiang, Wenqing / Yeap, Beow Y / Drapek, Lorraine C / Ly, Leilana / Baglini, Christian V / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Ferrone, Cristina R / Parikh, Aparna R / Weekes, Colin D / Nipp, Ryan D / Kwak, Eunice L / Allen, Jill N / Corcoran, Ryan B / Ting, David T / Faris, Jason E / Zhu, Andrew X / Goyal, Lipika / Berger, David L / Qadan, Motaz / Lillemoe, Keith D / Talele, Nilesh / Jain, Rakesh K / DeLaney, Thomas F / Duda, Dan G / Boucher, Yves / Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos / Hong, Theodore S. ·Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·JAMA Oncol · Pubmed #31145418.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer have historically poor outcomes. Evaluation of a total neoadjuvant approach is warranted. Objective: To evaluate the margin-negative (R0) resection rate of neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan) and losartan followed by chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants: A single-arm phase 2 clinical trial was conducted at a large academic hospital from August 22, 2013, to May 22, 2018, among 49 patients with previously untreated locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer as determined by multidisciplinary review. Patients had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 or 1 and adequate hematologic, renal, and hepatic function. Median follow-up for the analysis was 17.1 months (range, 5.0-53.7) among 27 patients still alive at study completion. Interventions: Patients received FOLFIRINOX and losartan for 8 cycles. Patients with radiographically resectable tumor after chemotherapy received short-course chemoradiotherapy (5 GyE × 5 with protons) with capecitabine. Patients with persistent vascular involvement received long-course chemoradiotherapy (50.4 Gy with a vascular boost to 58.8 Gy) with fluorouracil or capecitabine. Main Outcomes and Measures: R0 resection rate. Results: Of the 49 patients (26 women and 23 men; median age 63 years [range, 42-78 years]), 39 completed 8 cycles of FOLFIRINOX and losartan; 10 patients had fewer than 8 cycles due to progression (5 patients), losartan intolerance (3 patients), and toxicity (2 patients). Seven patients (16%) had short-course chemoradiotherapy while 38 (84%) had long-course chemoradiotherapy. Forty-two (86%) patients underwent attempted surgery, with R0 resection achieved in 34 of 49 patients (69%; 95% CI, 55%-82%). Overall median progression-free survival was 17.5 months (95% CI: 13.9-22.7) and median overall survival was 31.4 months (95% CI, 18.1-38.5). Among patients who underwent resection, median progression-free survival was 21.3 months (95% CI, 16.6-28.2), and median overall survival was 33.0 months (95% CI, 31.4 to not reached). Conclusions and Relevance: Total neoadjuvant therapy with FOLFIRINOX, losartan, and chemoradiotherapy provides downstaging of locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and is associated with an R0 resection rate of 61%. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01821729.

4 Clinical Trial Total Neoadjuvant Therapy With FOLFIRINOX Followed by Individualized Chemoradiotherapy for Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Phase 2 Clinical Trial. 2018

Murphy, Janet E / Wo, Jennifer Y / Ryan, David P / Jiang, Wenqing / Yeap, Beow Y / Drapek, Lorraine C / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Kwak, Eunice L / Allen, Jill N / Clark, Jeffrey W / Faris, Jason E / Zhu, Andrew X / Goyal, Lipika / Lillemoe, Keith D / DeLaney, Thomas F / Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos / Ferrone, Cristina R / Hong, Theodore S. ·Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. ·JAMA Oncol · Pubmed #29800971.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Patients with borderline-resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma have historically poor outcomes with surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Evaluation of a total neoadjuvant approach with highly active therapy is warranted. Objective: To evaluate the margin-negative (R0) resection rate in borderline-resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma after neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin) therapy and individualized chemoradiotherapy. Design, Setting, and Participants: A single-arm, phase 2 clinical trial was conducted at a large academic hospital with expertise in pancreatic surgery from August 3, 2012, through August 31, 2016, among 48 patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated, localized pancreatic cancer determined to be borderline resectable by multidisciplinary review, who had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 or 1 and adequate hematologic, renal, and hepatic function. Median follow-up for the analysis was 18.0 months among the 30 patients still alive at study completion. Interventions: Patients received FOLFIRINOX for 8 cycles. Upon restaging, patients with resolution of vascular involvement received short-course chemoradiotherapy (5 Gy × 5 with protons) with capecitabine. Patients with persistent vascular involvement received long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluorouracil or capecitabine. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was R0 resection rate; secondary outcomes were median progression-free survival (PFS) and median overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 48 eligible patients, 27 were men and 21 were women, with a median age of 62 years (range, 46-74 years). Of the 43 patients who planned to receive 8 preoperative cycles of chemotherapy, 34 (79%) were able to complete all cycles. Twenty-seven patients (56%) had short-course chemoradiotherapy, while 17 patients (35%) had long-course chemoradiotherapy. R0 resection was achieved in 31 of the 48 eligible patients (65%; 95% CI, 49%-78%). Among the 32 patients who underwent resection, the R0 resection rate was 97% (n = 31). Median PFS among all eligible patients was 14.7 months (95% CI, 10.5 to not reached), with 2-year PFS of 43%; median OS was 37.7 months (95% CI, 19.4 to not reached), with 2-year OS of 56%. Among patients who underwent resection, median PFS was 48.6 months (95% CI, 14.4 to not reached) and median OS has not been reached, with a 2-year PFS of 55% and a 2-year OS of 72%. Conclusions and Relevance: Preoperative FOLFIRINOX followed by individualized chemoradiotherapy in borderline resectable pancreatic cancer results in high rates of R0 resection and prolonged median PFS and median OS, supporting ongoing phase 3 trials. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01591733.

5 Clinical Trial Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Antitumor Activity of Necuparanib Combined with Nab-Paclitaxel and Gemcitabine in Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: Phase I Results. 2017

O'Reilly, Eileen M / Roach, James / Miller, Paul / Yu, Kenneth H / Tjan, Catherine / Rosano, Molly / Krause, Silva / Avery, William / Wolf, Julie / Flaherty, Keith / Nix, Darrell / Ryan, David P. ·Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, New York, USA oreillye@mskcc.org. · Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Momenta Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Novella Clinical, Morrisville, North Carolina, USA. · Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Oncologist · Pubmed #29158367.

ABSTRACT: LESSONS LEARNED: Despite the compelling preclinical rationale of evaluating the genetically engineered heparin derivative, necuparanib, combined with standard therapy in metastatic pancreas adenocarcinoma, the results were ultimately disappointing.Safety was documented, although dose escalation was limited by the number of subcutaneous injections, the potential for skin toxicity (cellulitis), and low-level anticoagulant effect. Nonetheless, the hypothesis of targeting prothrombotic pathways in pancreas adenocarcinoma remains compelling. BACKGROUND: Necuparanib is derived from unfractionated heparin and engineered for reduced anticoagulant activity while preserving known heparin-associated antitumor properties. This trial assessed the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics, and initial efficacy of necuparanib combined with gemcitabine ± nab-paclitaxel in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Patients received escalating daily subcutaneous doses of necuparanib plus 1,000 mg/m RESULTS: Thirty-nine patients were enrolled into seven cohorts (necuparanib 0.5, 1 mg/kg + gemcitabine; necuparanib 1, 2, 4, 6, and 5 mg/kg + nab-paclitaxel + gemcitabine). The most common adverse events were anemia (56%), fatigue (51%), neutropenia (51%), leukopenia (41%), and thrombocytopenia (41%). No deaths and two serious adverse events were potentially related to necuparanib. Measurable levels of necuparanib were seen starting at the 2 mg/kg dose. Of 24 patients who received at least one dose of necuparanib + nab-paclitaxel + gemcitabine, 9 (38%) achieved a partial response and 6 (25%) achieved stable disease (63% disease control rate). Given a cellulitis event and mild activated partial thromboplastin time increases at 6 mg/kg, the 5 mg/kg dose was considered the MTD and selected for further assessment in phase II. CONCLUSION: Acceptable safety and encouraging signals of activity in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer receiving necuparanib, nab-paclitaxel, and gemcitabine were demonstrated.

6 Clinical Trial Randomized Phase II Trial of Gemcitabine Plus TH-302 Versus Gemcitabine in Patients With Advanced Pancreatic Cancer. 2015

Borad, Mitesh J / Reddy, Shantan G / Bahary, Nathan / Uronis, Hope E / Sigal, Darren / Cohn, Allen L / Schelman, William R / Stephenson, Joe / Chiorean, E Gabriela / Rosen, Peter J / Ulrich, Brian / Dragovich, Tomislav / Del Prete, Salvatore A / Rarick, Mark / Eng, Clarence / Kroll, Stew / Ryan, David P. ·Mitesh J. Borad, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale · Tomislav Dragovich, Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ · Shantan G. Reddy, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Shreveport, Shreveport, LA · Nathan Bahary, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA · Hope E. Uronis, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC · Darren Sigal, Scripps Clinic, La Jolla · Peter J. Rosen, Disney Family Cancer Center, Burbank · Clarence Eng and Stew Kroll, Threshold Pharmaceuticals, South San Francisco, CA · Allen L. Cohn, Rocky Mountain Cancer Center, Denver, CO · William R. Schelman, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI · Joe Stephenson Jr, Institute for Translational Oncology Research, Greenville, SC · E. Gabriela Chiorean, Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, IN · Brian Ulrich, Texas Oncology, Wichita Falls, TX · Salvatore A. Del Prete, Hematology Oncology PC, Stamford, CT · Mark Rarick, Kaiser Permanente Northwest Region Oncology Hematology, Portland, OR · and David P. Ryan, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #25512461.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: TH-302 is an investigational hypoxia-activated prodrug that releases the DNA alkylator bromo-isophosphoramide mustard in hypoxic settings. This phase II study (NCT01144455) evaluated gemcitabine plus TH-302 in patients with previously untreated, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients were randomly assigned 1:1:1 to gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m(2)), gemcitabine plus TH-302 240 mg/m(2) (G+T240), or gemcitabine plus TH-302 340 mg/m(2) (G+T340). Randomized crossover after progression on gemcitabine was allowed. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), tumor response, CA 19-9 response, and safety. RESULTS: Two hundred fourteen patients (77% with metastatic disease) were enrolled between June 2010 and July 2011. PFS was significantly longer with gemcitabine plus TH-302 (pooled combination arms) compared with gemcitabine alone (median PFS, 5.6 v 3.6 months, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.87; P = .005; median PFS for metastatic disease, 5.1 v 3.4 months, respectively). Median PFS times for G+T240 and G+T340 were 5.6 and 6.0 months, respectively. Tumor response was 12%, 17%, and 26% in the gemcitabine, G+T240, and G+T340 arms, respectively (G+T340 v gemcitabine, P = .04). CA 19-9 decrease was greater with G+T340 versus gemcitabine (-5,398 v -549 U/mL, respectively; P = .008). Median OS times for gemcitabine, G+T240, and G+T340 were 6.9, 8.7, and 9.2 months, respectively (P = not significant). The most common adverse events (AEs) were fatigue, nausea, and peripheral edema (frequencies similar across arms). Skin and mucosal toxicities (2% grade 3) and myelosuppression (55% grade 3 or 4) were the most common TH-302-related AEs but were not associated with treatment discontinuation. CONCLUSION: PFS, tumor response, and CA 19-9 response were significantly improved with G+TH-302. G+T340 is being investigated further in the phase III MAESTRO study (NCT01746979).

7 Clinical Trial A phase II, open-label, multicenter study to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of CO-1.01 as second-line therapy for gemcitabine-refractory patients with stage IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma and negative tumor hENT1 expression. 2014

Li, D / Pant, S / Ryan, D P / Laheru, D / Bahary, N / Dragovich, T / Hosein, P J / Rolfe, L / Saif, M W / LaValle, J / Yu, K H / Lowery, M A / Allen, A / O'Reilly, E M. ·Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA. · Massachussetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · The Sydney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD, USA. · University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ, USA. · Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL, USA. · Clovis Oncology, Cambridge, UK; Clovis Oncology, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: oreillye@mskcc.org. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #25278310.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nucleotide transporters such as human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1) play a major role in transporting gemcitabine into cells. CO-1.01 (gemcitabine-5'-elaidate) is a novel cytotoxic agent consisting of a fatty acid derivative of gemcitabine, which is transported intracellularly independent of hENT1. CO-1.01 was postulated to have efficacy as a second-line treatment in gemcitabine-refractory pancreatic adenocarcinoma in patients with negative tumor hENT1 expression. METHODS: Eligibility criteria included patients with either a newly procured or archival biopsy tumor confirming the absence of hENT1 and either gemcitabine-refractory metastatic pancreas adenocarcinoma or with progression of disease following resection during or within 3 months of adjuvant gemcitabine therapy. Patients were treated with intravenous infusion of CO-1.01 dosed at 1250 mg/m(2) on Days 1, 8, and 15 of a 4-week cycle. The primary end point was disease control rate (DCR). RESULTS: Nineteen patients were enrolled of which 18 patients were evaluable for efficacy assessment. Thirteen patients (68%) had liver metastases, 6 (32%) had lymph node metastases, and 10 (53%) had lung metastases. Two of 18 patients (11%) achieved disease control. The median survival time was 4.3 (95% CI 2.1-8.1) months. All patients experienced at least one treatment-related adverse event with the majority of events being mild or moderate. CONCLUSION: This study did not meet its primary endpoint and no efficacy signal was identified for CO-1.01 in treating progressive metastatic pancreas adenocarcinoma.

8 Clinical Trial A phase 1/2 and biomarker study of preoperative short course chemoradiation with proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery for resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2014

Hong, Theodore S / Ryan, David P / Borger, Darrell R / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Yeap, Beow Y / Ancukiewicz, Marek / Deshpande, Vikram / Shinagare, Shweta / Wo, Jennifer Y / Boucher, Yves / Wadlow, Raymond C / Kwak, Eunice L / Allen, Jill N / Clark, Jeffrey W / Zhu, Andrew X / Ferrone, Cristina R / Mamon, Harvey J / Adams, Judith / Winrich, Barbara / Grillo, Tarin / Jain, Rakesh K / DeLaney, Thomas F / Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos / Duda, Dan G. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: tshong1@partners.org. · Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #24867540.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate the safety, efficacy and biomarkers of short-course proton beam radiation and capecitabine, followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy in a phase 1/2 study in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients with radiographically resectable, biopsy-proven PDAC were treated with neoadjuvant short-course (2-week) proton-based radiation with capecitabine, followed by surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine. The primary objective was to demonstrate a rate of toxicity grade ≥ 3 of <20%. Exploratory biomarker studies were performed using surgical specimen tissues and peripheral blood. RESULTS: The phase 2 dose was established at 5 daily doses of 5 GyE. Fifty patients were enrolled, of whom 35 patients were treated in the phase 2 portion. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities, and only 2 of 35 patients (4.1%) experienced a grade 3 toxicity event (chest wall pain grade 1, colitis grade 1). Of 48 patients eligible for analysis, 37 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Thirty of 37 (81%) had positive nodes. Locoregional failure occurred in 6 of 37 resected patients (16.2%), and distant recurrence occurred in 35 of 48 patients (72.9%). With median follow-up of 38 months, the median progression-free survival for the entire group was 10 months, and overall survival was 17 months. Biomarker studies showed significant associations between worse survival outcomes and the KRAS point mutation change from glycine to aspartic acid at position 12, stromal CXCR7 expression, and circulating biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, and HGF (all, P<.05). CONCLUSIONS: This study met the primary endpoint by showing a rate of 4.1% grade 3 toxicity for neoadjuvant short-course proton-based chemoradiation. Treatment was associated with favorable local control. In exploratory analyses, KRAS(G12D) status and high CXCR7 expression and circulating CEA, CA19-9, and HGF levels were associated with poor survival.

9 Clinical Trial Phase I study of neoadjuvant accelerated short course radiation therapy with photons and capecitabine for resectable pancreatic cancer. 2014

Wo, Jennifer Y / Mamon, Harvey J / Ferrone, Cristina R / Ryan, David P / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Kwak, Eunice L / Tseng, Yolanda D / Napolitano, Brian N / Ancukiewicz, Marek / Swanson, Richard S / Lillemoe, Keith D / Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos / Hong, Theodore S. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. Electronic address: jwo@partners.org. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. · Department of General Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. · Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. · Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, United States. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. · Department of General Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. ·Radiother Oncol · Pubmed #24231241.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: In this phase I study, we sought to determine the feasibility and tolerability of neoadjuvant short course radiotherapy (SC-CRT) delivered with photon RT with concurrent capecitabine for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients with localized, resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled from December 2009 to August 2011. In dose level I, patients received 3 Gy × 10. In dose level 2, patients received 5 Gy × 5 (every other day). In dose level 3, patients received 5 Gy × 5 (consecutive days). Capecitabine was given during weeks 1 and 2. Surgery was performed 1-3 weeks after completion of chemotherapy. RESULTS: With an intended accrual of 12 patients, the study was closed early due to unexpected intraoperative complications. Compared to the companion phase I proton study, patients treated with photons had increased intraoperative RT fibrosis reported by surgeons (27% vs. 63%). Among those undergoing a Whipple resection, increased RT fibrosis translated to an increased mean OR time of 69 min. Dosimetric comparison revealed significantly increased low dose exposure to organs at risk for patients treated with photon RT. CONCLUSIONS: This phase I experience evaluating the tolerability of neoadjuvant SC-CRT with photon RT closed early due to unexpected intraoperative complications.

10 Clinical Trial A prospective, phase 1/2 study of everolimus and temozolomide in patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. 2013

Chan, Jennifer A / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence / Stuart, Keith / Zhu, Andrew X / Allen, Jill / Wadlow, Raymond / Ryan, David P / Meyerhardt, Jeffrey / Gonzalez, Marielle / Regan, Eileen / Zheng, Hui / Kulke, Matthew H. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Cancer · Pubmed #23733618.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Both everolimus and temozolomide are associated with single-agent activity in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET). A phase 1/2 study was performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of temozolomide in combination with everolimus in patients who have advanced pancreatic NET. METHODS: Patients were treated with temozolomide at a dose of 150 mg/m(2) per day on days 1 through 7 and days 15 through 21 in combination with everolimus daily in each 28-day cycle. In cohort 1, temozolomide was administered together with everolimus at 5 mg daily. Following demonstration of safety in this cohort, subsequent patients in cohort 2 were treated with temozolomide plus everolimus at 10 mg daily. The duration of temozolomide treatment was limited to 6 months. Patients were followed for toxicity, radiologic and biochemical response, and survival. RESULTS: A total of 43 patients were enrolled, including 7 in cohort 1 and 36 in cohort 2. Treatment was associated with known toxicities of each drug; no synergistic toxicities were observed. Among 40 evaluable patients, 16 (40%) experienced a partial response. The median progression-free survival duration was 15.4 months. Median overall survival was not reached. CONCLUSIONS: Temozolomide and everolimus can be safely administered together in patients with advanced pancreatic NET, and the combination is associated with encouraging antitumor activity. Future studies evaluating the efficacy of combination therapy compared to treatment with either agent alone are warranted.

11 Clinical Trial A multi-institutional, phase II open-label study of ganitumab (AMG 479) in advanced carcinoid and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2013

Strosberg, J R / Chan, J A / Ryan, D P / Meyerhardt, J A / Fuchs, C S / Abrams, T / Regan, E / Brady, R / Weber, J / Campos, T / Kvols, L K / Kulke, M H. ·Department of GI Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, Florida 33612, USA. jonathan.strosberg@moffitt.org ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #23572164.

ABSTRACT: The IGF pathway has been implicated in the regulation of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) growth, and preliminary studies suggested that ganitumab (AMG 479), a human MAB against IGF1R, may have antitumor activity in this setting. We performed a two-cohort phase II study of ganitumab in patients with metastatic progressive carcinoid or pancreatic NETs (pNETs). This open-label study enrolled patients (≥18 years) with metastatic low- and intermediate-grade carcinoid or pNETs. Inclusion criteria included evidence of progressive disease (by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST)) within 12 months of enrollment, ECOG PS 0-2, and fasting blood sugar <160  mg/dl. Prior treatments were allowed and concurrent somatostatin analog therapy was permitted. The primary endpoint was objective response. Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and safety. Sixty patients (30 carcinoid and 30 pNETs) were treated with ganitumab 18  mg/kg every 3 weeks, among whom 54 patients were evaluable for survival and 53 patients for response. There were no objective responders by RECIST. The median PFS duration was 6.3 months (95% CI, 4.2-12.6) for the entire cohort; 10.5 months for carcinoid patients, and 4.2 months for pNET patients. The OS rate at 12 months was 66% (95% CI, 52-77%) for the entire cohort. The median OS has not been reached. Grade 3/4 AEs were rare and consisted of hyperglycemia (4%), neutropenia (4%), thrombocytopenia (4%), and infusion reaction (1%). Although well tolerated, treatment with single-agent ganitumab failed to result in significant tumor responses among patients with metastatic well-differentiated carcinoid or pNET.

12 Clinical Trial A phase 2 study of oral MKC-1, an inhibitor of importin-β, tubulin, and the mTOR pathway in patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. 2012

Faris, Jason E / Arnott, Jamie / Zheng, Hui / Ryan, David P / Abrams, Thomas A / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Clark, Jeffrey W / Enzinger, Peter C / Hezel, Aram F / Ng, Kimmie / Wolpin, Brian M / Kwak, Eunice L. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, POB 221, Boston, MA 02114, USA. ·Invest New Drugs · Pubmed #21800081.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: MKC-1 is an orally available cell cycle inhibitor with downstream targets that include tubulin and the importin-β family. We conducted an open-label Phase II study with MKC-1 in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Eligibility criteria included unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer, performance status of 1 or better, and failure of at least one prior regimen of chemotherapy. MKC-1 was administered orally, twice daily, initially at 100 mg/m(2) dosing for 14 consecutive days of a 28-day cycle. This schedule was modified during the trial to fixed and continuous dosing of 150 mg per day. RESULTS: 20 of an original target of 33 patients were accrued, with a median age of 61 (range 44-81). No objective responses were observed, with one patient demonstrating stable disease. Overall survival was 101 days from the start of MKC-1 administration, and median time to progression was 42 days. The most common adverse events listed as related or possibly related to MKC-1 administration were hematologic toxicities and fatigue. One patient developed grade 5 (fatal) pancytopenia. Grade 3 and 4 events included cytopenias (lymphopenia, anemia), hyperbilirubinemia, pneumonia, mucositis, fatigue, infusion reaction, anorexia, and hypoalbuminemia. CONCLUSIONS: MKC-1 administration was associated with substantial toxicity and did not demonstrate sufficient activity in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer to justify further exploration in this patient population.

13 Clinical Trial Phase I study of preoperative short-course chemoradiation with proton beam therapy and capecitabine for resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma of the head. 2011

Hong, Theodore S / Ryan, David P / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Mamon, Harvey J / Kwak, Eunice L / Mino-Kenudson, Mari / Adams, Judith / Yeap, Beow / Winrich, Barbara / DeLaney, Thomas F / Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. tshong1@partners.org ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #20421151.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate the safety of 1 week of chemoradiation with proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifteen patients with localized resectable, pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the head were enrolled from May 2006 to September 2008. Patients received radiation with proton beam. In dose level 1, patients received 3 GyE × 10 (Week 1, Monday-Friday; Week 2, Monday-Friday). Patients in Dose Levels 2 to 4 received 5 GyE × 5 in progressively shortened schedules: level 2 (Week 1, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday; Week 2, Tuesday and Thursday), Level 3 (Week 1, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday; Week 2, Monday), Level 4 (Week 1, Monday through Friday). Capecitabine was given as 825 mg/m(2) b.i.d. Weeks 1 and 2 Monday through Friday for a total of 10 days in all dose levels. Surgery was performed 4 to 6 weeks after completion of chemotherapy for Dose Levels 1 to 3 and then after 1 to 3 weeks for Dose Level 4. RESULTS: Three patients were treated at Dose Levels 1 to 3 and 6 patients at Dose Level 4, which was selected as the MTD. No dose limiting toxicities were observed. Grade 3 toxicity was noted in 4 patients (pain in 1; stent obstruction or infection in 3). Eleven patients underwent resection. Reasons for no resection were metastatic disease (3 patients) and unresectable tumor (1 patient). Mean postsurgical length of stay was 6 days (range, 5-10 days). No unexpected 30-day postoperative complications, including leak or obstruction, were found. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative chemoradiation with 1 week of proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery is feasible. A Phase II study is underway.

14 Article Phase 1b study of a small molecule antagonist of human chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (PF-04136309) in combination with nab-paclitaxel/gemcitabine in first-line treatment of metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2019

Noel, Marcus / O'Reilly, Eileen M / Wolpin, Brian M / Ryan, David P / Bullock, Andrea J / Britten, Carolyn D / Linehan, David C / Belt, Brian A / Gamelin, Eric C / Ganguly, Bishu / Yin, Donghua / Joh, Tenshang / Jacobs, Ira A / Taylor, Carrie T / Lowery, Maeve A. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center School of Medicine & Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. · MGH Cancer Center, Division of Hematogy-Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Division of Hematology/Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. · Division of Hematology/Oncology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Rochester Medical Center School of Medicine & Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA. · Early Oncology Development and Clinical Research, Pfizer Inc, 219 East 42nd Street, New York, NY, 10017, USA. · Lyell Immunopharma Inc, Palo Alto, CA, USA. · Early Oncology Development and Clinical Research, Pfizer Inc, 219 East 42nd Street, New York, NY, 10017, USA. ira.jacobs@pfizer.com. · Trinity St James's Cancer Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. ·Invest New Drugs · Pubmed #31297636.

ABSTRACT: Background In pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)/chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) axis plays a key role in immunosuppressive properties of the tumor microenvironment, patient prognosis, and chemoresistance. This phase Ib study assessed the effects of the orally administered CCR2 inhibitor PF-04136309 in combination with nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine in patients with previously untreated metastatic PDAC. Methods Patients received PF-04136309 twice daily (BID) continuously plus nab-paclitaxel (125 mg/m

15 Article Neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX for Patients with Borderline Resectable or Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: Results of a Decision Analysis. 2019

Choi, Jin G / Nipp, Ryan D / Tramontano, Angela / Ali, Ayman / Zhan, Tiannan / Pandharipande, Pari / Dowling, Emily C / Ferrone, Cristina R / Hong, Theodore S / Schrag, Deborah / Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos / Ryan, David P / Kong, Chung Yin / Hur, Chin. ·Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Institute for Technology Assessment, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Health Innovations Research and Evaluations Unit, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA rnipp@mgh.harvard.edu. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. ·Oncologist · Pubmed #30559125.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of using neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX (nFOLFIRINOX) for patients with borderline resectable or locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR/LA PDAC) are unknown. Our objective was to determine whether nFOLFIRINOX is more effective or cost-effective for patients with BR/LA PDAC compared with upfront resection surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine plus capecitabine (GEM/CAPE) or gemcitabine monotherapy (GEM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a decision-analysis to assess the value of nFOLFIRINOX versus GEM/CAPE or GEM using a mathematical simulation model. Model transition probabilities were estimated using published and institutional clinical data. Model outcomes included overall and disease-free survival, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), cost in U.S. dollars, and cost-effectiveness expressed as an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses explored the uncertainty of model assumptions. RESULTS: Model results found median overall survival (34.5/28.0/22.0 months) and disease-free survival (15.0/14.0/13.0 months) were better for nFOLFIRINOX compared with GEM/CAPE and GEM. nFOLFIRINOX was the optimal strategy on an efficiency frontier, resulting in an additional 0.35 life-years, or 0.30 QALYs, at a cost of $46,200/QALY gained compared with GEM/CAPE. Sensitivity analysis found that cancer recurrence and complete resection rates most affected model results, but were otherwise robust. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses found that nFOLFIRINOX was cost-effective 92.4% of the time at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/QALY. CONCLUSION: Our modeling analysis suggests that nFOLFIRINOX is preferable to upfront surgery for patients with BR/LA PDAC from both an effectiveness and cost-effectiveness standpoint. Additional clinical data that further define the long-term effectiveness of nFOLFIRINOX are needed to confirm our results. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Increasingly, neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX has been used for borderline resectable and locally advanced pancreatic cancer with the goal of rendering them resectable and decreasing risk of recurrence. Despite many efforts to show the benefits of neoadjuvant over adjuvant therapies, clinical evidence to guide this decision is largely lacking. Decision-analytic modeling can provide a methodologic platform that integrates the best available data to quantitatively explore clinical decisions by simulating a hypothetical clinical trial. This modeling analysis suggests that neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX is preferable to upfront surgery and adjuvant therapies by various outcome metrics including quality-adjusted life years, overall survival, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio.

16 Article Predictors of Resectability and Survival in Patients With Borderline and Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer who Underwent Neoadjuvant Treatment With FOLFIRINOX. 2019

Michelakos, Theodoros / Pergolini, Ilaria / Castillo, Carlos Fernández-Del / Honselmann, Kim C / Cai, Lei / Deshpande, Vikram / Wo, Jennifer Y / Ryan, David P / Allen, Jill N / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Clark, Jeffrey W / Murphy, Janet E / Nipp, Ryan D / Parikh, Aparna / Qadan, Motaz / Warshaw, Andrew L / Hong, Theodore S / Lillemoe, Keith D / Ferrone, Cristina R. ·Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #29227344.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine (1) whether preoperative factors can predict resectability of borderline resectable (BR) and locally advanced (LA) pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) after neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX, (2) which patients might benefit from adjuvant therapy, and (3) survival differences between resected BR/LA patients who received neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX and upfront resected patients. BACKGROUND: Patients with BR/LA PDAC are often treated with FOLFIRINOX to obtain a margin-negative resection, yet selection of patients for resection remains challenging. METHODS: Clinicopathologic data of PDAC patients surgically explored between 04/2011-11/2016 in a single institution were retrospectively collected. RESULTS: Following neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX, 141 patients were surgically explored (BR: 49%, LA: 51%) and 110 (78%) were resected. Resected patients had lower preoperative CA 19-9 levels (21 vs 40 U/mL, P = 0.03) and smaller tumors on preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan (2.3 vs 3.0 cm, P = 0.03), but no predictors of resectability were identified. Median overall survival (OS) was 34.2 months from diagnosis for all FOLFIRINOX patients and 37.7 months for resected patients. Among resected patients, preoperative CA 19-9 >100 U/mL and >8 months between diagnosis and surgery predicted a shorter postoperative disease-free survival (DFS); Charlson comorbidity index >1, preoperative CA 19-9 >100 U/mL and tumor size (>3.0 cm on CT or >2.5 cm on pathology) predicted decreased OS. DFS and OS were significantly better for BR/LA PDAC patients treated with neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX compared with upfront resected patients (DFS: 29.1 vs 13.7, P < 0.001; OS: 37.7 vs 25.1 months from diagnosis, P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: BR/LA PDAC patients with no progression on neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX should be offered surgical exploration. Except size, traditional pathological parameters fail to predict survival among resected FOLFIRINOX patients. Resected FOLFIRINOX patients have survival that appears to be superior than that of resectable patients who go directly to surgery.

17 Article Mutant GNAS drives pancreatic tumourigenesis by inducing PKA-mediated SIK suppression and reprogramming lipid metabolism. 2018

Patra, Krushna C / Kato, Yasutaka / Mizukami, Yusuke / Widholz, Sebastian / Boukhali, Myriam / Revenco, Iulia / Grossman, Elizabeth A / Ji, Fei / Sadreyev, Ruslan I / Liss, Andrew S / Screaton, Robert A / Sakamoto, Kei / Ryan, David P / Mino-Kenudson, Mari / Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-Del / Nomura, Daniel K / Haas, Wilhelm / Bardeesy, Nabeel. ·Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Departments of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Institute of Biomedical Research, Sapporo Higashi Tokushukai Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan. · Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido, Japan. · Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology, Chemistry, and Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA. · Departments of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Departments of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · MRC Protein Phosphorylation and Ubiquitylation Unit, School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland, UK. · Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences SA, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Departments of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. Bardeesy.Nabeel@mgh.harvard.edu. · Departments of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Bardeesy.Nabeel@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Nat Cell Biol · Pubmed #29941929.

ABSTRACT: G protein α

18 Article Improved Detection of Circulating Epithelial Cells in Patients with Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms. 2018

Franses, Joseph W / Basar, Omer / Kadayifci, Abdurrahman / Yuksel, Osman / Choz, Melissa / Kulkarni, Anupriya S / Tai, Eric / Vo, Kevin D / Arora, Kshitij S / Desai, Niyati / Licausi, Joseph A / Toner, Mehmet / Maheswaran, Shyamala / Haber, Daniel A / Ryan, David P / Brugge, William R / Ting, David T. ·Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Center for Engineering in Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, Maryland, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA brugge.william@mgh.harvard.edu dting1@mgh.harvard.edu. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA brugge.william@mgh.harvard.edu dting1@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Oncologist · Pubmed #28860411.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recent work has demonstrated early shedding of circulating epithelial cells (CECs) from premalignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). However, the potential use of CECs as a "liquid biopsy" for patients with IPMNs has been limited by antigen dependence of CEC isolation devices and the lack of robust detection biomarkers across CEC phenotypes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We utilized a negative depletion microfluidic platform to purify CECs from contaminating leukocytes and coupled this platform with immunofluorescence, RNA in situ hybridization, and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) detection and enumeration. RESULTS: Using established protein (EpCAM, cytokeratins) and novel noncoding RNA (HSATII, cytokeratins) biomarkers, we detected CECs in 88% of patients bearing IPMN lesions. RNA-seq analysis for MUC genes confirm the likely origin of these CECs from pancreatic lesions. CONCLUSION: Our findings increase the sensitivity of detection of these cells and therefore could have clinical implications for cancer risk stratification. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: This work describes a high-sensitivity platform for detection of epithelial cells shed from preneoplastic lesions at high risk of malignant transformation. Further research efforts are underway to define the transcriptional programs that might allow discrimination between circulating cells released from tumors that will become malignant and cells released from tumors that will not. After further refinement, this combination of technologies could be deployed for monitoring and early detection of patients at high risk for developing new or recurrent pancreatic malignancies.

19 Article Tolerability and Long-term Outcomes of Dose-Painted Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation to Regions of Vessel Involvement in Borderline or Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer. 2018

Wo, Jennifer Y / Niemierko, Andrzej / Ryan, David P / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Clark, Jeffrey W / Kwak, Eunice L / Lillemoe, Keith D / Drapek, Lorraine N / Zhu, Andrew X / Allen, Jill N / Faris, Jason E / Murphy, Janet E / Nipp, Ryan / Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos / Ferrone, Cristina R / Hong, Theodore S. ·Departments of Radiation Oncology. · Medical Oncology. · General Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. ·Am J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #28134673.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: We reviewed our experience involving patients with borderline resectable or locally advanced pancreatic cancer, treated with the dose-painted (DP) boost technique to regions of vessel involvement which preclude upfront surgical resection. We evaluated patient outcomes with respect to tolerability and treatment outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 99 patients with borderline resectable (n=25) or locally advanced pancreatic cancer (n=74) treated with DP-neoadjuvant chemoradiation from 2010 to 2015. Tumor and regional lymph nodes were prescribed 50.4 Gy and the region around the involved blood vessel was boosted to 58.8 Gy in 28 fractions. The primary outcome was acute toxicity and late duodenal toxicity. Secondary outcomes included conversion to surgical resectability, local failure, disease-free survival, and overall survival (OS). Cox proportional hazards models were performed to evaluate for predictors of survival. RESULTS: All but 1 patient completed chemoradiation. The rates of grade 2+ and 3+ nausea were 40% and 12%, respectively. With regards to late toxicity, 5 patients developed potential RT-related grade 3+ duodenal complications including duodenal ulceration/bleeding (n=3) and duodenal stricture (n=2). With a median follow-up of 15 months, the median OS was 18.1 months. Among 99 patients in our study, 37 patients underwent surgical resection. For patients who underwent surgical resection (n=37), the median OS was 30.9 months. On multivariate analysis, only normalization of CA 19-9 post-RT was associated with improved OS. CONCLUSIONS: We found that DP-neoadjuvant chemoradiation to regions of vessel involvement is both feasible and well tolerated. In addition, we demonstrated that over one third of patients with initially deemed unresectable disease were able to undergo surgical resection after receiving neoadjuvant therapy including DP-chemoradiation.

20 Article Intraoperative Radiotherapy in the Era of Intensive Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Chemoradiotherapy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma. 2018

Keane, Florence K / Wo, Jennifer Y / Ferrone, Cristina R / Clark, Jeffrey W / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Allen, Jill N / Kwak, Eunice L / Ryan, David P / Lillemoe, Keith D / Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos / Hong, Theodore S. ·Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School. · Departments of Radiation Oncology. · Surgery. · Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. ·Am J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #27740973.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Improved outcomes with FOLFIRINOX or gemcitabine with nab-paclitaxel in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have prompted incorporation of these regimens into neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced unresectable PDAC. Whereas some patients remain unresectable on surgical exploration, others are able to undergo resection after intensive neoadjuvant treatment. We evaluated outcomes and toxicity associated with use of intensive neoadjuvant treatment followed by intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in combination with resection or exploratory laparotomy. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed patients with locally advanced unresectable or borderline-resectable PDAC who received intensive neoadjuvant treatment with induction chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy followed by exploratory laparotomy in an IORT-equipped operating suite between 2010 and 2015. Surgical outcomes and overall survival (OS) were compared. RESULTS: Of 68 patients, 41 (60.3%) underwent resection, 18 (26.5%) had unresectable disease, and 9 (13.2%) had distant metastases. Of 41 resectable patients, 22 received IORT for close/positive resection margins on intraoperative frozen section. There was no significant difference in operative times or morbidity with addition of IORT to resection. Median OS was 26.6 months for all patients who underwent resection, 35.1 months for patients who underwent resection and IORT, and 24.5 months for patients who underwent resection alone (P=NS). Of 18 patients with unresectable disease, all but 1 received IORT, with median OS of 24.8 months. IORT was associated with increased hospital stay (4 vs. 3.5 d), but no significant difference in operative times or morbidity. CONCLUSIONS: IORT in addition to intensive neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy was not associated with increased toxicity when used with resection or exploratory laparotomy, and was associated with encouraging survival rates in patients with close/positive margins and patients with unresectable disease.

21 Article Tumor engraftment in patient-derived xenografts of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is associated with adverse clinicopathological features and poor survival. 2017

Pergolini, Ilaria / Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente / Mino-Kenudson, Mari / Honselmann, Kim C / Rosenbaum, Matthew W / Nahar, Sabikun / Kem, Marina / Ferrone, Cristina R / Lillemoe, Keith D / Bardeesy, Nabeel / Ryan, David P / Thayer, Sarah P / Warshaw, Andrew L / Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos / Liss, Andrew S. ·Department of Surgery and the Andrew L. Warshaw, MD Institute for Pancreatic Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America. · Department of Surgery, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America. · Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #28854237.

ABSTRACT: Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumors are powerful tools to study cancer biology. However, the ability of PDX tumors to model the biological and histological diversity of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is not well known. In this study, we subcutaneously implanted 133 primary and metastatic PDAC tumors into immunodeficient mice. Fifty-seven tumors were successfully engrafted and even after extensive passaging, the histology of poorly-, moderately-, and well-differentiated tumors was maintained in the PDX models. Moreover, the fibroblast and collagen contents in the stroma of patient tumors were recapitulated in the corresponding PDX models. Analysis of the clinicopathological features of patients revealed xenograft tumor engraftment was associated with lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.001) and worse recurrence-free (median, 7 vs. 16 months, log-rank P = 0.047) and overall survival (median, 13 vs. 21 months, log-rank P = 0.038). Among successful engraftments, median time of growth required for reimplantation into new mice was 151 days. Reflective of the inherent biological diversity between PDX tumors with rapid (<151 days) and slow growth, differences in their growth were maintained during extensive passaging. Rapid growth was additionally associated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.022). The association of lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis with PDX formation and rapid growth may reflect an underlying biological mechanism that allows these tumors to adapt and grow in a new environment. While the ability of PDX tumors to mimic the cellular and non-cellular features of the parental tumor stroma provides a valuable model to study the interaction of PDAC cells with the tumor microenvironment, the association of successful engraftment with adverse clinicopathological features suggests PDX models over represent more aggressive forms of this disease.

22 Article Use of Angiotensin System Inhibitors Is Associated with Immune Activation and Longer Survival in Nonmetastatic Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma. 2017

Liu, Hao / Naxerova, Kamila / Pinter, Matthias / Incio, Joao / Lee, Hang / Shigeta, Kohei / Ho, William W / Crain, Jonathan A / Jacobson, Alex / Michelakos, Theodoros / Dias-Santos, Daniella / Zanconato, Andrea / Hong, Theodore S / Clark, Jeffrey W / Murphy, Janet E / Ryan, David P / Deshpande, Vikram / Lillemoe, Keith D / Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos / Downes, Michael / Evans, Ronald M / Michaelson, James / Ferrone, Cristina R / Boucher, Yves / Jain, Rakesh K. ·Steele Laboratories for Tumor Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Leder Human Biology and Translational Medicine, Biology and Biomedical Sciences, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts. · Laboratory for Quantitative Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, La Jolla, California. · Steele Laboratories for Tumor Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. yves@steele.mgh.harvard.edu jain@steele.mgh.harvard.edu. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #28600474.

ABSTRACT:

23 Article Predictors of Early Mortality After Surgical Resection of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma in the Era of Neoadjuvant Treatment. 2017

Nipp, Ryan D / Zanconato, Andrea / Zheng, Hui / Ferrone, Cristina R / Lillemoe, Keith D / Wo, Jennifer Y / Hong, Theodore S / Clark, Jeffrey W / Ryan, David P / Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos. ·From the Departments of *Medical Oncology, †Surgery, ‡Biostatistics Center, and §Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #27846142.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Neoadjuvant treatments are increasingly used for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), yet some experience early mortality after resection. We sought to identify predictors of early mortality after PDAC resection and determine their interaction with neoadjuvant therapy. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of patients with PDAC resection from March 2011 to March 2014. We compared those who died within one year after surgery to those living beyond 1 year, and those who received neoadjuvant therapy to those taken directly to surgery. We used logistic regression to identify predictors of early mortality and determine their interaction with neoadjuvant therapy. RESULTS: Of 191 patients who underwent resection, 59 (30.9%) died within 1 year and 79 (41.4%) received neoadjuvant therapy. Early mortality patients were older, with higher comorbidity, and more likely to have lymph node positivity. Patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy were younger, with lower comorbidity, and more likely to have upfront unresectable disease. Predictors of early mortality included: higher comorbidity, poorly differentiated tumor grade, and lymph node positivity. We found that neoadjuvant therapy moderated the effects of comorbidity and lymph node positivity on early mortality risk. CONCLUSIONS: We identified predictors of early mortality after PDAC resection and determined their interaction with neoadjuvant therapy.

24 Article Understanding the Paradigm Shift in Pancreatic Cancer. 2016

Ryan, David P / Hong, Theodore S. ·Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. ·J Oncol Pract · Pubmed #27858558.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Article Radiological and surgical implications of neoadjuvant treatment with FOLFIRINOX for locally advanced and borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. 2015

Ferrone, Cristina R / Marchegiani, Giovanni / Hong, Theodore S / Ryan, David P / Deshpande, Vikram / McDonnell, Erin I / Sabbatino, Francesco / Santos, Daniela Dias / Allen, Jill N / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Clark, Jeffrey W / Faris, Jason E / Goyal, Lipika / Kwak, Eunice L / Murphy, Janet E / Ting, David T / Wo, Jennifer Y / Zhu, Andrew X / Warshaw, Andrew L / Lillemoe, Keith D / Fernández-del Castillo, Carlos. ·*Department of Surgery †Department of Radiation Oncology; and ‡Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #25599322.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: On the basis of the ACCORD trial, FOLFIRINOX is effective in metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), making it a rational choice for locally advanced PDAC (LA). Aims of this study are to evaluate the accuracy of imaging in determining the resectability of PDAC and to determine the surgical and clinicopathologic outcomes of pancreatic resections after neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX therapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Clinicopathologic data were retrospectively collected for surgical PDAC patients receiving neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX or no neoadjuvant therapy between April 2011 and February 2014. Americas Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association/Society of Surgical Oncology/Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract consensus guidelines defined LA and borderline. Imaging was reviewed by a blinded senior pancreatic surgeon. RESULTS: Of 188 patients undergoing resection for PDAC, 40 LA/borderline received FOLFIRINOX and 87 received no neoadjuvant therapy. FOLFIRINOX resulted in a significant decrease in tumor size, yet 19 patients were still classified as LA and 9 as borderline. Despite post-FOLFIRINOX imaging suggesting continued unresectability, 92% had an R0 resection. When compared with no neoadjuvant therapy, FOLFIRINOX resulted in significantly longer operative times (393 vs 300 minutes) and blood loss (600 vs 400 mL), but significantly lower operative morbidity (36% vs 63%) and no postoperative pancreatic fistulas. Length of stay (6 vs 7 days), readmissions (20% vs 30%), and mortality were equivalent (1% vs 0%). On final pathology, the FOLFIRINOX group had a significant decrease in lymph node positivity (35% vs 79%) and perineural invasion (72% vs 95%). Median follow-up was 11 months with a significant increase in overall survival with FOLFIRINOX. CONCLUSIONS: After neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX imaging no longer predicts unresectability. Traditional pathologic predictors of survival are improved, and morbidity is decreased in comparison to patients with clearly resectable cancers at the time of presentation.

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