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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Philippe Ruszniewski
Based on 78 articles published since 2010
(Why 78 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, P. Ruszniewski wrote the following 78 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4
1 Editorial New treatments of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: why using them? How to use them? 2012

Raymond, Eric / Ruszniewski, Philippe. · ·Target Oncol · Pubmed #22669625.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Review Gastroenteropancreatic Well-Differentiated Grade 3 Neuroendocrine Tumors: Review and Position Statement. 2016

Coriat, Romain / Walter, Thomas / Terris, Benoît / Couvelard, Anne / Ruszniewski, Philippe. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Cochin Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France romain.coriat@cch.aphp.fr. · Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Service d'Oncologie Digestive, Lyon Cedex 03, France Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, , Lyon, France. · Department of Pathology, Cochin Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Pathology, Bichat Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Départements Hospitalo Universitaires, Paris, France Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Départements Hospitalo Universitaires, Clichy, France. · Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Départements Hospitalo Universitaires, Clichy, France. ·Oncologist · Pubmed #27401895.

ABSTRACT: : In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neuroendocrine neoplasms was reviewed and validated the crucial role of the proliferative rate. According to the WHO classification 2010, gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms are classified as well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of grade 1 or 2 in up to 84%, or poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas in 6%-8%. Neuroendocrine carcinomas are of grade G. Recently, a proportion of neuroendocrine tumors presenting a number of mitoses or a Ki-67 index higher than 20% and a well-differentiated morphology have been identified, calling for a new category, well-differentiated grade 3 NET (NET G-3). Studies that have reported the characteristics of neuroendocrine neoplasms have identified more well-differentiated NET G-3 than neuroendocrine carcinomas. The main localizations of NET G-3 are the pancreas, stomach, and colon. Treatment for NET G-3 is not standardized and is balanced between G-1/2 neuroendocrine tumor and neuroendocrine carcinoma treatments. In nonmetastatic neuroendocrine tumors, the European and American guidelines recommended a surgical resection for localized neuroendocrine neoplasm, irrespective of the tumor grading. In NET G-3, chemotherapy is the benchmark if the main treatment goal is reduction of the tumor mass, particularly if it would allow a secondary surgery. In the present work, we review the epidemiology and make recommendations for the management of NET G-3. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Neuroendocrine tumors presenting a number of mitoses or a Ki-67 index higher than 20% and a well-differentiated morphology have been identified and named well-differentiated grade 3 neuroendocrine tumors (NET G-3). The main localizations of NET G-3 are the pancreas, stomach, and colon. The prognosis is worse than that for NET G-2. In nonmetastatic NET G-3, surgery appeared to be the first option. The chemotherapy regimen in pancreatic NET G-3 should be in line with that implemented in NET G-1/2 when the Ki-67 index is below 55% and should be in line with that implemented for neuroendocrine carcinoma when Ki-67 is above 55%.

3 Review Sunitinib in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2012

Raymond, Eric / Hammel, Pascal / Dreyer, Chantal / Maatescu, Christian / Hentic, Olivia / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Faivre, Sandrine. ·Department of Medical Oncology (INSERM U728-Paris 7 Diderot University), Beaujon University Hospital, 100 boulevard du Général Leclerc, 92110, Clichy, France. eric.raymond@bjn.aphp.fr ·Target Oncol · Pubmed #22661319.

ABSTRACT: Sunitinib is an oral multitarget tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent antiangiogenic properties. Preclinical data have demonstrated that pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors depend on vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and platelet growth factor receptors-signaling pathways for tumor angiogenesis. Sunitinib has recently been approved for the treatment of patients with advanced, progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Sunitinib has demonstrated clinically meaningful improvements in progression-free survival in a double-blinded randomized trial against placebo, setting progression-free survival as a valid endpoint for the evaluation of novel agents in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Although patients who progressed in this phase III trial were allowed to cross-over, a trend toward improvement in overall survival was also observed. In this trial, side effects reported with sunitinib were those previously reported in other tumor types, including hand-foot syndrome, diarrhea, and hypertension. This trial also investigated patient-reported outcome and showed that treatment with sunitinib did not affect quality of life of patient. Interestingly, this trial showed that sunitinib could be combined with somatostatin analogues without affecting the safety profile of either sunitinib or somatostatin analogues. Since the overall survival of patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors remains sufficiently long, it is worth considering using alternate sequences of targeted therapy (such as everolimus) and chemotherapy to optimize the care of patients with advanced diseases. The optimal sequence for using chemotherapy, everolimus, and sunitinib will remain to be established in clinical trials.

4 Review An overview of hereditary pancreatitis. 2012

Rebours, Vinciane / Lévy, Philippe / Ruszniewski, Philippe. ·Pôle des Maladies de l'Appareil Digestif, Service de Gastroentérologie - Pancréatologie, Hôpital Beaujon, AP-HP, Université Denis Diderot-Paris VII, Clichy, France. vinciane.rebours@bjn.aphp.fr ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #21907651.

ABSTRACT: Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatitis. The prevalence was evaluated to 0.3/100000 in Western Countries. Genetic disorders are due to mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). Since 1996, more than 30 mutations were found. The three more common mutations are R122H, N29I and A16V. First symptoms begin since childhood, mainly before 10 years old. Main symptoms are pancreatic pain and acute pancreatitis (>70%). CP morphological changes as pancreatic calcifications are diagnosed at a median age of 22-25 years. Exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency occurred in 34% and 26% at a median age of 29 and 38 years. No clinical differences exist according to the mutation type. No excess of mortality in hereditary pancreatitis population compared to general population was found, despite a real risk of cancer. The cumulative risks of pancreatic cancer at 50, 60 and, 75 years are 10%, 18.7% and, 53.5%, respectively. The relative risk of cancer increases in smokers and is evaluated to 8.55. Hereditary pancreatitis diagnosis permits to propose an adapted management in expert centres.

5 Review Imaging IPMN: take home messages and news. 2011

Vullierme, M P / d'Assignies, G / Ruszniewski, P / Vilgrain, V. ·Radiology department, Beaujon hospital, 100, boulevard General-Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France. marie-pierre.vullierme@bjn.aphp.fr ·Clin Res Hepatol Gastroenterol · Pubmed #21616741.

ABSTRACT: IPMN is a frequent disease involving pancreatic duct. This disease could be malignant (parenchymal invasive adenocarcinoma), particularly if the main pancreatic duct is involved (this involvement is considered present if > 6 mm), if this enlargement reaches 10 mm or more, and if the pathological phenotype is biliopancreatic or intestinal (malignancy is less frequent if gastric one). Invasiveness is suspected if hypodense parenchymal lesion is present, particularly near a cystical lesion or MPD, a mural nodule of the wall, or if MPD wall has got a contrast uptake. Mural nodules inside cystic branch duct are associated with in situ grade 3 malignancies. MPD IPMN must be resected to prevent malignancy. The follow-up of isolated branch duct cysts relies upon MDCT and MRI, every two years if lesion is less than 1cm. Every one year if bigger, particularly if more than to 3 cm.

6 Review Mixed endocrine somatostatinoma of the ampulla of vater associated with a neurofibromatosis type 1: a case report and review of the literature. 2010

Deschamps, Lydia / Dokmak, Safi / Guedj, Nathalie / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Sauvanet, Alain / Couvelard, Anne. ·Department of Pathology, CHU Pierre Zobda-Quitman, Fort-de-France, France. ·JOP · Pubmed #20065557.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Mixed endocrine tumors are double neoplasms with both glandular and endocrine components; these tumors are rare, especially those arising in the ampulla of Vater. Ampullary somatostatinomas are classically associated with neurofibromatosis type 1. We herein describe the first reported case of a mixed endocrine somatostatinoma of the ampulla of Vater associated with neurofibromatosis type 1; we also present a review of the literature of the 7 mixed endocrine tumors of the ampulla which have been reported so far. CASE REPORT: A 49-year-old woman presented with atypical abdominal pain. Endoscopic examination revealed a tumor involving the ampulla of Vater and a CT scan identified stenoses of both the distal common bile duct and the main pancreatic duct. A pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed and pathological examination revealed two tumor components, exocrine (high grade adenoma with infiltrative adenocarcinoma) and endocrine (expressing somatostatin hormone) with lymph node metastases originating from both types. The patient was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy and has had no recurrence for 3 years. DISCUSSION: In ampullary somatostatinomas, psammoma bodies are pathognomonic and chromogranin A is rarely expressed: these features should alert the pathologist to an association with neurofibromatosis type 1. The management of patients with mixed tumors is challenging. The treatment of choice is surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy should be adapted to the most aggressive component, i.e. the exocrine one. CONCLUSION: Because of their rarity, the diagnosis of ampullary mixed endocrine tumors is difficult. Our case points out the characteristic features of these neoplasms and their possible association with neurofibromatosis type 1.

7 Clinical Trial Clinical and Biomarker Evaluations of Sunitinib in Patients with Grade 3 Digestive Neuroendocrine Neoplasms. 2018

Pellat, Anna / Dreyer, Chantal / Couffignal, Camille / Walter, Thomas / Lombard-Bohas, Catherine / Niccoli, Patricia / Seitz, Jean François / Hentic, Olivia / André, Thierry / Coriat, Romain / Faivre, Sandrine / Zappa, Magaly / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Pote, Nicolas / Couvelard, Anne / Raymond, Eric. ·Medical Oncology, Hôpital Saint Antoine, AP-HP, Paris, France. · Biostatistics, Hôpital Bichat, AP-HP, Paris, France. · Gastroenterology, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. · Medical Oncology, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. · Medical Oncology, Hôpital La Timone, Marseille, France. · Gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, Hôpital La Timone, Marseille, France. · Gastroenterology, Hôpital Beaujon, AP-HP, Clichy, France. · Gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, Hôpital Cochin, AP-HP, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Medical Oncology, Hôpital Beaujon, AP-HP, Paris, France. · Radiology, Hôpital Beaujon, AP-HP, Clichy, France. · Department of Pathology Beaujon-Bichat, AP-HP, DHU UNITY, Clichy, France. · Medical Oncology, Hôpital Saint Joseph, AP-HP, Paris, France. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #29518779.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/AIMS: Angiogenesis is extensively developed in well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PanNET) where sunitinib was shown to prolong progression-free survival, leading to nationwide approval. However, clinical experience in patients with grade 3 gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEPNEN-G3) remains limited. This prospective phase II trial evaluated potential predictive biomarkers of sunitinib activity in patients with advanced GEPNEN-G3. METHODS: Sunitinib was given at a dose of 37.5 mg/day as a continuous daily dosing until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Evaluation of activity was based on RECIST1.1. Safety was evaluated according to NCI-CTCAE v4. Pharmacokinetics of sunitinib and its main active metabolite SU12662 were evaluated. All tumour samples were reviewed histologically for tumour differentiation. PDGFRβ, carbonic anhydrase 9, Ki-67, VEGFR2, and p-AKT were quantified using immunohistochemistry and their expression correlated with response by RECIST1.1. RESULTS: Thirty-one patients were included and 26 had available histological tissue. Six and 20 patients presented well-differentiated tumours (NET-G3) and neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC), respectively. Eighteen patients responded to sunitinib (4 experienced partial responses and 14 tumour stabilization). A high p-AKT expression correlated with lower response to sunitinib (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.89-0.99, p = 0.04). Safety and PK exposure to sunitinib and SU12662 in these patients were consistent with that reported in PanNET. CONCLUSION: Sunitinib showed evidence of activity in patients with GEPNEN-G3 with expected toxicity profile. In the NET-G3 and NEC groups, 4/6 and 11/20 patients were responders, respectively. High p-AKT expression predicted a lower response to sunitinib. Our study allowed the identification of a potential biomarker of resistance/sensitivity to sunitinib in aggressive GEPNEN-G3.

8 Clinical Trial Long-term Follow-up of MEN1 Patients Who Do Not Have Initial Surgery for Small ≤2 cm Nonfunctioning Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, an AFCE and GTE Study: Association Francophone de Chirurgie Endocrinienne & Groupe d'Etude des Tumeurs Endocrines. 2018

Triponez, Frederic / Sadowski, Samira M / Pattou, François / Cardot-Bauters, Catherine / Mirallié, Eric / Le Bras, Maëlle / Sebag, Frédéric / Niccoli, Patricia / Deguelte, Sophie / Cadiot, Guillaume / Poncet, Gilles / Lifante, Jean-Christophe / Borson-Chazot, Françoise / Chaffanjon, Philippe / Chabre, Olivier / Menegaux, Fabrice / Baudin, Eric / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Du Boullay, Hélène / Goudet, Pierre. ·Department of Thoracic and Endocrine Surgery, University Hospitals of Geneva and Faculty of Medicine of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of General and Endocrine Surgery, University Hospital of Lille, Lille, France. · Department of Endocrinology, University Hospital of Lille, Lille, France. · Department of Digestive and Endocrine Surgery, University Hospital of Nantes, Nantes, France. · Department of Endocrinology, University Hospital of Nantes, Nantes, France. · Department of Endocrine Surgery, La Conception University Hospital, Marseille, France. · Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille, France. · Department of Digestive and Endocrine Surgery, University Hospital of Reims, Reims, France. · Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, University Hospital of Reims, Reims, France. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital of Lyon, Lyon, France. · Department of Digestive and Endocrine Surgery, University Hospital of Lyon Sud and 2/EA 7425 HESPER, Health Services and Performance Research, University Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France. · Department of Endocrinology, Hospital Louis Pradel, University Lyon I, Lyon, France. · Department of Thoracic, Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, University Hospital of Grenoble, Grenoble, France. · Department of Endocrinology and Diabetology, University Hospital of Grenoble, Grenoble, France. · Department of Digestive and Endocrine Surgery, University Hospital La Pitié Salpétrière, Paris, France. · Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Gustave Roussy, University of Paris Sud, Villejuif, France. · Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, University Paris 7, Clichy, France. · Department of Endocrinology, General Hospital of Chambéry, Chambéry, France. · Department of Endocrine Surgery, University Hospital of Dijon, and INSERM, U866, Epidemiology and Clinical Research in Digestive Oncology Team, and INSERM, CIC1432, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, University Hospital of Dijon, Clinical Investigation Center, Clinical Epidemiology/Clinical Trials Unit, Dijon, France. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #28263205.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To report long-term follow-up of patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NF-PET). BACKGROUND: Pancreaticoduodenal tumors occur in almost all patients with MEN1 and are a major cause of death. The natural history and clinical outcome are poorly defined, and management is still controversial for small NF-PET. METHODS: Clinical outcome and tumor progression were analyzed in 46 patients with MEN1 with 2 cm or smaller NF-PET who did not have surgery at the time of initial diagnosis. Survival data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: Forty-six patients with MEN1 were followed prospectively for 10.7 ± 4.2 (mean ± standard deviation) years. One patient was lost to follow-up and 1 died from a cause unrelated to MEN1. Twenty-eight patients had stable disease and 16 showed significant progression of pancreaticoduodenal involvement, indicated by increase in size or number of tumors, development of a hypersecretion syndrome, need for surgery (7 patients), and death from metastatic NF-PET (1 patient). The mean event-free survival was 13.9 ± 1.1 years after NF-PET diagnosis. At last follow-up, none of the living patients who had undergone surgery or follow-up had evidence of metastases on imaging studies. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that conservative management for patients with MEN1 with NF-PET of 2 cm or smaller is associated with a low risk of disease-specific mortality. The decision to recommend surgery to prevent tumor spread should be balanced with operative mortality and morbidity, and patients should be informed about the risk-benefit ratio of conservative versus aggressive management when the NF-PET represents an intermediate risk.

9 Clinical Trial A randomized, open-label, phase 2 study of everolimus in combination with pasireotide LAR or everolimus alone in advanced, well-differentiated, progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: COOPERATE-2 trial. 2017

Kulke, M H / Ruszniewski, P / Van Cutsem, E / Lombard-Bohas, C / Valle, J W / De Herder, W W / Pavel, M / Degtyarev, E / Brase, J C / Bubuteishvili-Pacaud, L / Voi, M / Salazar, R / Borbath, I / Fazio, N / Smith, D / Capdevila, J / Riechelmann, R P / Yao, J C. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology University of Paris VII and Beaujon Hospital, Paris, France. · Department of Digestive Oncology, University Hospitals Gasthuisberg/Leuven and KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Medical Oncology, Edouard Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, University of Manchester/The Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. · Department of Endocrine Oncology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Charité University of Medicine, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Oncology, Novartis AG, Basel, Switzerland. · Department of Oncology, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Catalan Institute of Oncology, IDIBELL, Hospital of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology Saint-Luc University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, St. Andrew Hospital, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Oncology, Cancer Institute of the State of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Gastrointestinal and Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28327907.

ABSTRACT: Background: Several studies have demonstrated the antitumor activity of first-generation somatostatin analogs (SSAs), primarily targeting somatostatin receptor (sstr) subtypes 2 and 5, in neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Pasireotide, a second-generation SSA, targets multiple sstr subtypes. We compared the efficacy and safety of pasireotide plus everolimus to everolimus alone in patients with advanced, well-differentiated, progressive pancreatic NET. Patients and methods: Patients were randomized 1 : 1 to receive a combination of everolimus (10 mg/day, orally) and pasireotide long-acting release (60 mg/28 days, intramuscularly) or everolimus alone (10 mg/day, orally); stratified by prior SSA use, and baseline serum chromogranin A and neuron-specific enolase. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival, objective response rate, disease control rate, and safety. Biomarker response was evaluated in an exploratory analysis. Results: Of 160 patients enrolled, 79 were randomized to the combination arm and 81 to the everolimus arm. Baseline demographics and disease characteristics were similar between the treatment arms. No significant difference was observed in PFS: 16.8 months in combination arm versus 16.6 months in everolimus arm (hazard ratio, 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-1.54). Partial responses were observed in 20.3% versus 6.2% of patients in combination arm versus everolimus arm; however, overall disease control rate was similar (77.2% versus 82.7%, respectively). No significant improvement was observed in median overall survival. Adverse events were consistent with the known safety profile of both the drugs; grade 3 or 4 fasting hyperglycemia was seen in 37% versus 11% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The addition of pasireotide to everolimus was not associated with the improvement in PFS compared with everolimus alone in this study. Further studies to delineate mechanisms by which SSAs slow tumor growth in NET are warranted.

10 Clinical Trial Sunitinib in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: updated progression-free survival and final overall survival from a phase III randomized study. 2017

Faivre, S / Niccoli, P / Castellano, D / Valle, J W / Hammel, P / Raoul, J-L / Vinik, A / Van Cutsem, E / Bang, Y-J / Lee, S-H / Borbath, I / Lombard-Bohas, C / Metrakos, P / Smith, D / Chen, J-S / Ruszniewski, P / Seitz, J-F / Patyna, S / Lu, D R / Ishak, K J / Raymond, E. ·Medical Oncology and Gastroenterology Department, Service Inter-Hospitalier de Cancérologie, Hôpital Beaujon and Paris Diderot University, Clichy. · Cancer Care, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, and RENATEN Network, Marseille, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Medical Oncology Department, The University of Manchester/The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · Translational Medicine - Digestive Cancers, Institut Paoli-Calmettes and RENATEN Network, Marseille, France. · Eastern Virginia Medical School Streilitz Diabetes Research Center and Neuroendocrine Unit, Norfolk, USA. · Digestive Oncology Unit, University Hospitals Leuven and KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Hepato-Gastroenterology Unit, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels, Belgium. · Medical Oncology Department, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France. · McGill University Hospital Centre, Montreal, Canada. · Oncology Department, University Hospital, Bordeaux, France. · Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Timone, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Marseille, Aix-Marseille Université, and RENATEN Network, Marseille, France. · Pfizer Oncology, La Jolla, USA. · Department of Evidera, St-Laurent, Canada. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #27836885.

ABSTRACT: Background: In a phase III trial in patients with advanced, well-differentiated, progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, sunitinib 37.5 mg/day improved investigator-assessed progression-free survival (PFS) versus placebo (11.4 versus 5.5 months; HR, 0.42; P < 0.001). Here, we present PFS using retrospective blinded independent central review (BICR) and final median overall survival (OS), including an assessment highlighting the impact of patient crossover from placebo to sunitinib. Patients and methods: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, cross-sectional imaging from patients was evaluated retrospectively by blinded third-party radiologists using a two-reader, two-time-point lock, followed by a sequential locked-read, batch-mode paradigm. OS was summarized using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards model. Crossover-adjusted OS effect was derived using rank-preserving structural failure time (RPSFT) analyses. Results: Of 171 randomized patients (sunitinib, n = 86; placebo, n = 85), 160 (94%) had complete scan sets/time points. By BICR, median (95% confidence interval [CI]) PFS was 12.6 (11.1-20.6) months for sunitinib and 5.8 (3.8-7.2) months for placebo (HR, 0.32; 95% CI 0.18-0.55; P = 0.000015). Five years after study closure, median (95% CI) OS was 38.6 (25.6-56.4) months for sunitinib and 29.1 (16.4-36.8) months for placebo (HR, 0.73; 95% CI 0.50-1.06; P = 0.094), with 69% of placebo patients having crossed over to sunitinib. RPSFT analysis confirmed an OS benefit for sunitinib. Conclusions: BICR confirmed the doubling of PFS with sunitinib compared with placebo. Although the observed median OS improved by nearly 10 months, the effect estimate did not reach statistical significance, potentially due to crossover from placebo to sunitinib. Trial registration number: NCT00428597.

11 Clinical Trial Anti-tumour effects of lanreotide for pancreatic and intestinal neuroendocrine tumours: the CLARINET open-label extension study. 2016

Caplin, Martyn E / Pavel, Marianne / Ćwikła, Jarosław B / Phan, Alexandria T / Raderer, Markus / Sedláčková, Eva / Cadiot, Guillaume / Wolin, Edward M / Capdevila, Jaume / Wall, Lucy / Rindi, Guido / Langley, Alison / Martinez, Séverine / Gomez-Panzani, Edda / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Anonymous1290854. ·Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France m.caplin@ucl.ac.uk. · Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France. · Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #26743120.

ABSTRACT: In the CLARINET study, lanreotide Autogel (depot in USA) significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic pancreatic/intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). We report long-term safety and additional efficacy data from the open-label extension (OLE). Patients with metastatic grade 1/2 (Ki-67 ≤ 10%) non-functioning NET and documented baseline tumour-progression status received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg (n = 101) or placebo (n = 103) for 96 weeks or until death/progressive disease (PD) in CLARINET study. Patients with stable disease (SD) at core study end (lanreotide/placebo) or PD (placebo only) continued or switched to lanreotide in the OLE. In total, 88 patients (previously: lanreotide, n = 41; placebo, n = 47) participated: 38% had pancreatic, 39% midgut and 23% other/unknown primary tumours. Patients continuing lanreotide reported fewer adverse events (AEs) (all and treatment-related) during OLE than core study. Placebo-to-lanreotide switch patients reported similar AE rates in OLE and core studies, except more diarrhoea was considered treatment-related in OLE (overall diarrhoea unchanged). Median lanreotide PFS (core study randomisation to PD in core/OLE; n=101) was 32.8 months (95% CI: 30.9, 68.0). A sensitivity analysis, addressing potential selection bias by assuming that patients with SD on lanreotide in the core study and not entering the OLE (n=13) had PD 24 weeks after last core assessment, found median PFS remaining consistent: 30.8 months (95% CI: 30.0, 31.3). Median time to further PD after placebo-to-lanreotide switch (n=32) was 14.0 months (10.1; not reached). This OLE study suggests long-term treatment with lanreotide Autogel 120 mg maintained favourable safety/tolerability. CLARINET OLE data also provide new evidence of lanreotide anti-tumour benefits in indolent and progressive pancreatic/intestinal NETs.

12 Clinical Trial Lanreotide in metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2014

Caplin, Martyn E / Pavel, Marianne / Ćwikła, Jarosław B / Phan, Alexandria T / Raderer, Markus / Sedláčková, Eva / Cadiot, Guillaume / Wolin, Edward M / Capdevila, Jaume / Wall, Lucy / Rindi, Guido / Langley, Alison / Martinez, Séverine / Blumberg, Joëlle / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Anonymous1240800. ·From Royal Free Hospital, London (M.E.C.) · Charité University Medicine Berlin, Berlin (M.P.) · University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland (J.B.Ć.) · University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston (A.T.P.) · University Hospital, Vienna (M.R.) · Department of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic (E.S.) · Robert-Debré Hospital, Reims (G.C.), Ipsen, Les Ulis, (A.L., S.M., J.B.), Beaujon Hospital, Clichy (P.R.), and Paris Diderot University, Paris (P.R.) - all in France · Samuel Oschin Cancer Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles (E.M.W.) · Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona (J.C.) · Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (L.W.) · and Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (G.R.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #25014687.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Somatostatin analogues are commonly used to treat symptoms associated with hormone hypersecretion in neuroendocrine tumors; however, data on their antitumor effects are limited. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational study of the somatostatin analogue lanreotide in patients with advanced, well-differentiated or moderately differentiated, nonfunctioning, somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors of grade 1 or 2 (a tumor proliferation index [on staining for the Ki-67 antigen] of <10%) and documented disease-progression status. The tumors originated in the pancreas, midgut, or hindgut or were of unknown origin. Patients were randomly assigned to receive an extended-release aqueous-gel formulation of lanreotide (Autogel [known in the United States as Depot], Ipsen) at a dose of 120 mg (101 patients) or placebo (103 patients) once every 28 days for 96 weeks. The primary end point was progression-free survival, defined as the time to disease progression (according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.0) or death. Secondary end points included overall survival, quality of life (assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaires QLQ-C30 and QLQ-GI.NET21), and safety. RESULTS: Most patients (96%) had no tumor progression in the 3 to 6 months before randomization, and 33% had hepatic tumor volumes greater than 25%. Lanreotide, as compared with placebo, was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival (median not reached vs. median of 18.0 months, P<0.001 by the stratified log-rank test; hazard ratio for progression or death, 0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30 to 0.73). The estimated rates of progression-free survival at 24 months were 65.1% (95% CI, 54.0 to 74.1) in the lanreotide group and 33.0% (95% CI, 23.0 to 43.3) in the placebo group. The therapeutic effect in predefined subgroups was generally consistent with that in the overall population, with the exception of small subgroups in which confidence intervals were wide. There were no significant between-group differences in quality of life or overall survival. The most common treatment-related adverse event was diarrhea (in 26% of the patients in the lanreotide group and 9% of those in the placebo group). CONCLUSIONS: Lanreotide was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival among patients with metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors of grade 1 or 2 (Ki-67 <10%). (Funded by Ipsen; CLARINET ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00353496; EudraCT 2005-004904-35.).

13 Clinical Trial Sunitinib malate for the treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2011

Raymond, Eric / Dahan, Laetitia / Raoul, Jean-Luc / Bang, Yung-Jue / Borbath, Ivan / Lombard-Bohas, Catherine / Valle, Juan / Metrakos, Peter / Smith, Denis / Vinik, Aaron / Chen, Jen-Shi / Hörsch, Dieter / Hammel, Pascal / Wiedenmann, Bertram / Van Cutsem, Eric / Patyna, Shem / Lu, Dongrui Ray / Blanckmeister, Carolyn / Chao, Richard / Ruszniewski, Philippe. ·Service Inter-Hospitalier de Cancérologie et Service de Gastroenteropancréatologie, Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy, France. eric.raymond@bjn.aphp.fr ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #21306237.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib has shown activity against pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in preclinical models and phase 1 and 2 trials. METHODS: We conducted a multinational, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial of sunitinib in patients with advanced, well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. All patients had Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors-defined disease progression documented within 12 months before baseline. A total of 171 patients were randomly assigned (in a 1:1 ratio) to receive best supportive care with either sunitinib at a dose of 37.5 mg per day or placebo. The primary end point was progression-free survival; secondary end points included the objective response rate, overall survival, and safety. RESULTS: The study was discontinued early, after the independent data and safety monitoring committee observed more serious adverse events and deaths in the placebo group as well as a difference in progression-free survival favoring sunitinib. Median progression-free survival was 11.4 months in the sunitinib group as compared with 5.5 months in the placebo group (hazard ratio for progression or death, 0.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26 to 0.66; P<0.001). A Cox proportional-hazards analysis of progression-free survival according to baseline characteristics favored sunitinib in all subgroups studied. The objective response rate was 9.3% in the sunitinib group versus 0% in the placebo group. At the data cutoff point, 9 deaths were reported in the sunitinib group (10%) versus 21 deaths in the placebo group (25%) (hazard ratio for death, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.19 to 0.89; P=0.02). The most frequent adverse events in the sunitinib group were diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, asthenia, and fatigue. CONCLUSIONS: Continuous daily administration of sunitinib at a dose of 37.5 mg improved progression-free survival, overall survival, and the objective response rate as compared with placebo among patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. (Funded by Pfizer; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00428597.).

14 Article Natural history of SPINK1 germline mutation related-pancreatitis. 2019

Muller, Nelly / Sarantitis, Ioannis / Rouanet, Marie / de Mestier, Louis / Halloran, Christopher / Greenhalf, William / Férec, Claude / Masson, Emmanuelle / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Lévy, Philippe / Neoptolemos, John / Buscail, Louis / Rebours, Vinciane. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, APHP, Clichy, and Paris-Diderot University, Paris, France. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, England United Kingdom. · Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, INSERM U1037, University of Toulouse 3, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse, France. · UMR1078 Génétique, Génomique Fonctionnelle et Biotechnologies, INSERM, EFS - Bretagne, Université de Brest, CHRU Brest, Brest, France. · Department of General Surgery and transplantation, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, APHP, Clichy, and Paris-Diderot University, Paris, France. Electronic address: vinciane.rebours@aphp.fr. ·EBioMedicine · Pubmed #31628023.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim was to describe genetic, clinical and morphological features in a large, multicentre European cohort of patients with SPINK1 related pancreatitis, in comparison with patients with idiopathic pancreatitis (IP). METHODS: All SPINK1 mutation carriers with pancreatic symptoms from two French and one English centers were included. Patients with IP were included in a control group. Genetic, clinical, radiological and biochemical data were collected. FINDINGS: 209 and 302 patients were included in the SPINK1 and control groups (median follow-up: 8.3 years (3.7-17.4) vs 5.3 (2.5-8.8)). The median age at onset of symptoms was 20.1 years (17.5-22.8) in the SPINK1 group versus 41.2 (35.2-45.2). The age of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) onset in the SPINK1 group was 49.5 (44.5-54.6) years vs. 65.2 (62.1-68.3), p < 0.001. SPINK1 patients with EPI were 5.3%, 14.7%, 28.3% and 52.4% at 20, 30, 40 and 50 years. Diabetes occurred 37.7 (33.3-42.1) years following the onset of symptoms in the SPINK1 group vs. 30.6 (17.3-43.8) (p = 0.002). SPINK1 patients with diabetes were 7.8%, 13.4%, 26.3% and 43.4% at 30, 40, 50 and 60 years. Seven patients (3.3%) developed pancreatic cancer in the SPINK1 group (versus 3 (0.99%), p = 0.1), at a median age of 60 vs 66 years. The cancer risk was 0.8% before 50 years, 11.9%, 27.7%, 51.8% at 60, 70 and 80 years and was 12 times higher than in controls (Cox HR 12.0 (3.0-47.8), p < 0.001). INTERPRETATION: SPINK1 related pancreatitis is associated with earlier onset and pancreatic insufficiencies. p.N34S SPINK1 may well be associated with cancer.

15 Article Non-branched microcysts of the pancreas on MR imaging of patients with pancreatic tumors who had pancreatectomy may predict the presence of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN): a preliminary study. 2019

Vullierme, Marie-Pierre / Menassa, Lina / Couvelard, Anne / Rebours, Vinciane / Maire, Frédérique / Ibrahim, Tony / Cros, Jerome / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Sauvanet, Alain / Levy, Philippe / Soyer, Philippe / Vilgrain, Valerie. ·Paris Diderot University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, INSERM U1149 CRB3, Paris, France. marie-pierre.vullierme@aphp.fr. · Imaging Department, Hotel-Dieu de France Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon. · Department of Pathology, Beaujon University Hospital, Clichy, France. · Department of Pancreatology, Beaujon University Hospital, Clichy, France. · Oncology Department, Clinical Research Units, Clinical Biostatistical Research Units, Saint Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon. · Department of Hepato Pancreato Biliary Surgery, Beaujon University Hospital, Clichy, France. · Department of Radiology, Cochin University Hospital, Paris, France. · Paris Diderot University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, INSERM U1149 CRB3, Paris, France. ·Eur Radiol · Pubmed #30972547.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate whether pancreatic parenchymal abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are associated with pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) on histology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective study approved by institutional review board. One hundred patients (48 men, 52 women; mean age, 53.2 ± 16.29 [SD]) underwent MRI before pancreatectomy for pancreatic tumors analyzed by two independent observers blinded to histopathological results for the presence of non-communicating microcysts and pancreatic atrophy (global or focal) beside tumors. MRI findings were compared to histopathological findings of resected specimens. Interobserver agreement was calculated. The association between parenchymal abnormalities and presence of PanIN was assessed by uni- and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: PanIN was present in 65/100 patients (65%). The presence of microcysts on MRI had a sensitivity of 52.3% (34/65 [95%CI, 51.92-52.70%]), a specificity of 77.1% (27/35 [95%CI, 76.70-77.59]), and accuracy of 61% (61/100 95%CI [50.7-70.6]) for the diagnosis of PanIN while global atrophy had a sensitivity of 24.6% (16/6 [95%CI, 24.28-24.95]) and a specificity of 97.1% (34/35 [95%CI, 96.97-97.32%]). In multivariate analysis, the presence of microcysts (OR, 3.37 [95%CI, 1.3-8.76]) (p = 0.0127) and global atrophy (OR, 9.79 [95%CI, 1.21-79.129]) (p = 0.0324) were identified as independent predictors of the presence of PanIN. The combination of these two findings was observed in 10/65 PanIN patients and not in patients without PanIN (p = 0.013 with an OR of infinity [95%CI, 1.3-infinity]) and was not discriminant for PanIN-3 and lower grade (p = 0.22). Interobserver agreement for the presence of microcysts was excellent (kappa = 0.92), and for the presence of global atrophy, it was good (kappa = 0.73). CONCLUSION: The presence of non-communicating microcysts on pre-operative MRI can be a significant predictor of PanIN in patients with pancreatic tumors. KEY POINTS: • In patients with pancreatic tumors who had partial pancreatectomy, MR non-communicating pancreatic microcysts have a 52.3% sensitivity, a 77.1% specificity, and a 61% accuracy for the presence of PanIN with univariate and with an odds ratio of 3.37 with multivariate analyses. • The association of global atrophy and non-communicating microcysts increases the predictive risk of PanIN.

16 Article Comparison of Temozolomide-Capecitabine to 5-Fluorouracile-Dacarbazine in 247 Patients with Advanced Digestive Neuroendocrine Tumors Using Propensity Score Analyses. 2019

de Mestier, Louis / Walter, Thomas / Brixi, Hedia / Evrard, Camille / Legoux, Jean-Louis / de Boissieu, Paul / Hentic, Olivia / Cros, Jérôme / Hammel, Pascal / Tougeron, David / Lombard-Bohas, Catherine / Rebours, Vinciane / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Cadiot, Guillaume. ·Department of Pancreatology and Gatroenterology, ENETS Centre of Excellence, Hopital Beaujon, and Paris Diderot University, Clichy, France, louis.demestier@aphp.fr. · Department of Digestive Oncology, ENETS Centre of Excellence, Edouard Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France. · Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology and Reims-Champagne-Ardennes University, Reims, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Poitiers University Hospital, Poitiers, France. · Department of Hepato-Gatroenterology, La Source Hospital, Orlėans, France. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre Hospital, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. · Department of Pancreatology and Gatroenterology, ENETS Centre of Excellence, Hopital Beaujon, and Paris Diderot University, Clichy, France. · Department of Pathology, ENETS Centre of Excellence, Hopital Beaujon, and Paris Diderot University, Clichy, France. · Department of Digestive Oncology, ENETS Centre of Excellence, Hopital Beaujon, and Paris 7 University, Clichy, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, Poitiers University Hospital, Poitiers, France. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #30759445.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Although chemotherapy combining 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-dacarbazine (DTIC) or temozolomide (TEM)-capecitabine (CAP) is extensively used in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET), they were never compared. We compared their tolerance and efficacy in advanced NET. METHODS: We evaluated the records of consecutive patients with pancreatic or small-intestine advanced NET who received 5FU-DTIC or TEM-CAP between July 2004 and December 2017 in 5 French centers. Tolerance, tumor response and progression-free survival (PFS) were compared. Factors associated with PFS were analyzed using Cox multivariate regression model. To reduce the confounding bias of the nonrandomized design, PFS was compared using propensity score analyses. RESULTS: Ninety-four (5FU-DTIC) patients and 153 (TEM-CAP) patients were included. Pancreatic NET represented 82.3% of cases and 17.1, 61.8 and 10.9% of patients had G1, G2 or G3 NET respectively. Progression at baseline was reported in 92.7% of patients with available data. Grades 3-4 adverse events occurred in 24.7 and 8.5% of TEM-CAP and 5FU-DTIC patients respectively (p = 0.002). The overall response rate was 38.3 and 39.2% respectively (p = 0.596). Median PFS on raw analysis was similar to 5FU-DTIC and TEM-CAP (13.9 vs. 18.3 months, respectively p = 0.86). TEM-CAP was associated with an increased risk of progression on the raw multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] 1.90, 95% CI [1.32-2.73], p = 0.001) and when adjusted on propensity score (HR 1.65, 95% CI [1.18-2.31], p = 0.004). CONCLUSION: PFS may be longer with 5FU-DTIC than TEM-CAP in patients with advanced NET. Although patients often prefer oral chemotherapy, 5FU-DTIC is a relevant alternative. A randomized comparison is needed to confirm these results.

17 Article Tumor growth rate as a metric of progression, response, and prognosis in pancreatic and intestinal neuroendocrine tumors. 2019

Dromain, Clarisse / Pavel, Marianne E / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Langley, Alison / Massien, Christine / Baudin, Eric / Caplin, Martyn E / Anonymous4920975. ·Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, CHUV University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland. Clarisse.Dromain@chuv.ch. · Department of Medicine 1, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, Clichy, France. · Faculty of Medicine, Paris Diderot University, Paris, France. · Ipsen, Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · APHP, Hypertension unit, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, F-75015, Paris, France. · Endocrine Tumour and Nuclear Medicine Unit, Gustave-Roussy Cancer Campus, Villejuif, France. · Neuroendocrine Tumour Unit, Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. ·BMC Cancer · Pubmed #30642293.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Lanreotide depot/autogel antitumor activity in intestinal/pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) was demonstrated in the phase-3 CLARINET study (NCT00353496), based on significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) versus placebo. METHODS: During CLARINET, patients with metastatic intestinal/pancreatic NETs received lanreotide depot/autogel 120 mg or placebo every 4 weeks for 96 weeks. Imaging data (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST] v1.0, centrally reviewed) were re-evaluated in this post hoc analysis of tumor growth rate (TGR) in NETs. TGR (%/month) was calculated from two imaging scans during relevant periods: pre-treatment (TGR RESULTS: TGR CONCLUSIONS: TGR provides valuable information on tumor activity and prognosis in patients with metastatic intestinal/pancreatic NETs, and identifies early lanreotide depot/autogel antitumor activity. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Retrospective registration, 18 July 2006; EudraCT: 2005-004904-35; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00353496 .

18 Article Competitive Testing of the WHO 2010 versus the WHO 2017 Grading of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: Data from a Large International Cohort Study. 2018

Rindi, Guido / Klersy, Catherine / Albarello, Luca / Baudin, Eric / Bianchi, Antonio / Buchler, Markus W / Caplin, Martyn / Couvelard, Anne / Cros, Jérôme / de Herder, Wouter W / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Doglioni, Claudio / Federspiel, Birgitte / Fischer, Lars / Fusai, Giuseppe / Gavazzi, Francesca / Hansen, Carsten P / Inzani, Frediano / Jann, Henning / Komminoth, Paul / Knigge, Ulrich P / Landoni, Luca / La Rosa, Stefano / Lawlor, Rita T / Luong, Tu V / Marinoni, Ilaria / Panzuto, F / Pape, Ulrich-Frank / Partelli, Stefano / Perren, Aurel / Rinzivillo, Maria / Rubini, Corrado / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Scarpa, Aldo / Schmitt, Anja / Schinzari, Giovanni / Scoazec, Jean-Yves / Sessa, Fausto / Solcia, Enrico / Spaggiari, Paola / Toumpanakis, Christos / Vanoli, Alessandro / Wiedenmann, Bertram / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Zandee, Wouter T / Zerbi, Alessandro / Falconi, Massimo. ·Institute of Pathology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma-Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italyguido.rindi@unicatt.it. · Service of Biometry and Clinical Epidemiology, Research Department, and IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. · Pathology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Cancer Campus, Villejuif, France. · Department of Endocrinology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma-Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Neu Heidelberg, Germany. · Neuroendocrine Tumour Unit, Centre for Gastroenterology, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Hopital Beaujon, Paris ENETS Center of Excellence, Clichy, France. · Section Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center and and Erasmus MC Cancer Institute Rotterdam, Rotterdam ENETS Center of Excellence, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea University Hospital, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen ENETS Center of Excellence, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, University College, Royal Free Hospital, London ENETS Center of Excellence, London, United Kingdom. · Pancreatic Surgery, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Humanitas Milan ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen ENETS Center of Excellence, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Institute of Pathology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma-Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Charité, Campus Virchow Klinikum and Charite Mitte, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin ENETS Center of Excellence, Berlin, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Stadtspital Triemli, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, General and Pancreatic Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, Verona ENETS Center of Excellence, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Ospedale di Circolo, Università dell'Insubria, Varese, Italy. · Section of Pathology and ARC-Net Research Centre, Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona ENETS Center of Excellence, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University College, Royal Free Hospital, London ENETS Center of Excellence, London, United Kingdom. · Institute of Pathology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Marche Polytechnic University, Ancona, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Hopital Beaujon, Paris ENETS Center of Excellence, Clichy, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma-Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Department of Medical Biology and Pathology, Cancer Campus, Villejuif, France. · Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · Pathology Department, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Humanitas Milan ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar, Italy. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #30300897.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization (WHO) and the American Joint Cancer Committee (AJCC) modified the grading of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms from a three-tier (WHO-AJCC 2010) to a four-tier system by introducing the novel category of NET G3 (WHO-AJCC 2017). OBJECTIVES: This study aims at validating the WHO-AJCC 2017 and identifying the most effective grading system. METHOD: A total of 2,102 patients were enrolled; entry criteria were: (i) patient underwent surgery; (ii) at least 2 years of follow-up; (iii) observation time up to 2015. Data from 34 variables were collected; grading was assessed and compared for efficacy by statistical means including Kaplan-Meier method, Cox regression analysis, Harrell's C statistics, and Royston's explained variation in univariable and multivariable analyses. RESULTS: In descriptive analysis, the two grading systems demonstrated statistically significant differences for the major category sex but not for age groups. In Cox regression analysis, both grading systems showed statistically significant differences between grades for OS and EFS; however, no statistically significant difference was observed between the two G3 classes of WHO-AJCC 2017. In multivariable analysis for the two models fitted to compare efficacy, the two grading systems performed equally well with substantially similar optimal discrimination and well-explained variation for both OS and EFS. The WHO-AJCC 2017 grading system retained statistically significant difference between the two G3 classes for OS but not for EFS. CONCLUSIONS: The WHO-AJCC 2017 grading system is at least equally performing as the WHO-AJCC 2010 but allows the successful identification of the most aggressive PanNET subgroup. Grading is confirmed as probably the most powerful tool for predicting patient survival.

19 Article Biomarkers for the risk of thrombosis in pancreatic adenocarcinoma are related to cancer process. 2018

Faille, Dorothée / Bourrienne, Marie-Charlotte / de Raucourt, Emmanuelle / de Chaisemartin, Luc / Granger, Vanessa / Lacroix, Romaric / Panicot-Dubois, Laurence / Hammel, Pascal / Lévy, Philippe / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Ajzenberg, Nadine / Rebours, Vinciane. ·Department of Hematology, Bichat Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. · Laboratory for Vascular Translational Science (LVTS), INSERM U1148, University of Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Hematology, Beaujon Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Clichy, France. · Department of Immunology, Bichat Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. · Inflammation, Chemokines and Immunopathology, INSERM UMR 996, Paris-Sud University, Châtenay-Malabry, France. · Vascular Research Centre of Marseille (VRCM), INSERM UMR 1076, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France. · Haematology and Vascular Biology Laboratory, Conception Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Marseille, Marseille, France. · Digestive Oncology Unit, Beaujon Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Clichy, France. · Centre de Recherche sur l'Inflammation (CRI), INSERM UMR 1149, University of Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Department of Pancreatology and Gastroenterology, Beaujon Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Clichy, France. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #29899870.

ABSTRACT: Background: Venous thrombo-embolic events (VTE) frequently occur in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and contribute to high morbidity and mortality. Objectives: To determine whether VTE biomarkers are related to cancer, inflammation or precancerous states and to assess their relevance to predict VTE in PDAC. Patients and Methods: We compared VTE biomarkers in patients with PDAC ( Results: Factor VIII, D-dimers, von Willebrand factor, free tissue factor pathway inhibitor and microvesicle-tissue factor (MV-TF) activity were higher in PDAC patients compared to patients with IPMN or chronic pancreatitis. PDAC patients with metastasis presented higher D-dimers and MV-TF activity compared to patients with localized lesions, but elevation of D-dimers was dependent on tumor size. In multivariate analysis, elevated D-dimers (≥2.16 µg/mL) or MV-TF activity (≥2.37 pg/mL) were significant risk factors for VTE in PDAC patients, after adjustment for age and sex (HR 4.9 [1.0-23.1] or HR 10.5 [1.5-72.4], mean [interquartile range], respectively). Cumulative probability of VTE at 6 months was higher in patients with elevated D-dimers (56.3% vs 15.6%, Conclusions: VTE biomarkers including D-dimers and MV-TF activity are not related to inflammation but rather to cancer process and dissemination. D-dimers and MV-TF activity are associated to future VTE in PDAC patients and could help identify patients who could benefit from thromboprophylaxis.

20 Article None 2018

Dayot, Stéphanie / Speisky, Daniela / Couvelard, Anne / Bourgoin, Pierre / Gratio, Valérie / Cros, Jérôme / Rebours, Vinciane / Sauvanet, Alain / Bedossa, Pierre / Paradis, Valérie / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Couvineau, Alain / Voisin, Thierry. ·INSERM UMR1149 Centre de Recherche sur l'Inflammation (CRI), Université Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, DHU UNITY, Faculté de Médecine Xavier Bichat, Huchard, 75018 Paris, France. · Département de Pathologie Beaujon-Bichat, AP-HP, Hôpital Bichat, Huchard, 75018 Paris, France. · Département de Pathologie Beaujon-Bichat, AP-HP, Hôpital Beaujon, 92118 Clichy, France. · Service de Pancréatologie-Gastroentérologie PMAD, Pôle des Maladies de l'Appareil Digestif, AP-HP, Hôpital Beaujon, 92118 Clichy, France. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #29467942.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is still the poorest prognostic tumor of the digestive system. We investigated the antitumoral role of orexin-A and almorexant in PDAC. We analyzed the orexin receptor type 1 (OX1R) expression by immunohistochemistry in human normal pancreas, PDAC and its precursor dysplastic intraepithelial lesions. We used PDAC-derived cell lines and fresh tissue slices to study the apoptotic role of hypocretin-1/orexin-A and almorexant

21 Article Contrast harmonic EUS for the prediction of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor aggressiveness (with videos). 2018

Palazzo, Maxime / Napoléon, Bertrand / Gincul, Rodica / Pioche, Mathieu / Pujol, Bertrand / Lefort, Christine / Fumex, Fabien / Hautefeuille, Vincent / Fabre, Monique / Cros, Jérome / Felce, Michèle / Couvelard, Anne / Sauvanet, Alain / Lévy, Philippe / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Palazzo, Laurent. ·Beaujon Hospital, Department of Digestive Endoscopy, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Clichy, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, Jean Mermoz Private Hospital, Lyon, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, Edouard Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, Amiens-Picardie University Hospital, Amiens, France. · Department of Pathology, Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, France. · Department of Pathology, Beaujon Hospital, Clichy, France. · Department of Pathology, Bichat Hospital, Paris, France. · Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Beaujon Hospital, Clichy, France. · Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, Clichy, France. · Department of Endoscopy, Trocadéro Clinic, Paris, France. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #29325706.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Contrast harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) has the ability to depict tumor microvasculature. Decreased microvascular density has been identified as a factor associated with tumor aggressiveness. We aimed to study the accuracy of CH-EUS for the prediction of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) aggressiveness. METHODS: Between June 2009 and March 2015, all consecutive patients with histology-proven PNETs and CH-EUS examination were included. Nine endosonographers blindly analyzed all videos. CH-EUS tumor aggressiveness was defined as a heterogeneous enhancement at the early arterial phase. The final diagnosis of tumor aggressiveness was defined as follows: G3 tumors, morphologic and/or histologic findings of metastatic disease in G1/G2 tumors. Diagnostic values were calculated. Intratumoral microvascular density and fibrosis were assessed on pathologic specimens. RESULTS: Eighty-one tumors were included, of which 26 were aggressive (32.1%). In CH-EUS 35 tumors (43.2%) had a heterogeneous enhancement. The overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CH-EUS for the diagnosis of tumor aggressiveness were 86%, 96%, 82%, 71%, and 98%, respectively. The interobserver agreement among the 9 endosonographers was good (k = .66). The intraobserver agreement was excellent for the junior (κ = .83) and senior (κ = .82) endosonographers. Heterogeneous tumors at CH-EUS corresponded to fewer vascular and more fibrotic tumors (P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: CH-EUS is accurate in the prediction of PNET aggressiveness and could be a decision-making element in their management.

22 Article Prognosis of sporadic resected small (≤2 cm) nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors - a multi-institutional study. 2018

Sallinen, Ville J / Le Large, Tessa Y S / Tieftrunk, Elke / Galeev, Shamil / Kovalenko, Zahar / Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Antila, Anne / Franklin, Oskar / Martinez-Moneo, Emma / Robinson, Stuart M / Panzuto, Francesco / Regenet, Nicolas / Muffatti, Francesca / Partelli, Stefano / Wiese, Dominik / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Dousset, Bertrand / Edwin, Bjørn / Bartsch, Detlef K / Sauvanet, Alain / Falconi, Massimo / Ceyhan, Güralp O / Gaujoux, Sebastien / Anonymous100922. ·Department of Abdominal Surgery, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Transplantation and Liver Surgery, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: ville.salinen@helsinki.fi. · Department of Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · General Surgery Department, Saint Luke's Clinical Hospital, Saint Petersburg, Russia. · Federal Medical and Rehabilitation Center, Department of Surgical Oncology, Moscow, Russia. · The Intervention Center, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Department of Surgery, Drammen Hospital, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway. · Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umea University, Umea, Sweden. · Gastroenterology Department, Hospital Universitario Cruces, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, Spain. · Department of HPB Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital - Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · Department of Digestive and Endocrine Surgery, Institut des Maladies Digestives (IMAD), Nantes 44093, France. · Chirurgia Del Pancreas, Chirurgia Del Pancreas, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, Università Vita e Salute, Ospedale San Raffaele IRCC, Milano, Italy. · Department of Visceral, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Pôle des Maladies de L'Appareil Digestif (PMAD), DHU Unity, Clichy 92110, France; Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Department of Digestive, Pancreatic and Endocrine Surgery, Cochin Hospital, APHP, Paris, France; Faculté de Médecine Paris Descartes, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · The Intervention Center, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France; AP-HP, Hôpital Beaujon, Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Pôle des Maladies de L'Appareil Digestif (PMAD), DHU Unity, University Paris VII, AP-HP, Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy 92110, France. ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #28988702.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Malignant potential of small (≤20 mm) nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (sNF-PNET) is difficult to predict and management remain controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the prognosis of sporadic nonmetastatic sNF-PNETs. METHODS: Patients were identified from databases of 16 centers. Outcomes and risk factors for recurrence were identified by uni- and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: sNF-PNET was resected in 210 patients, and 66% (n = 138) were asymptomatic. Median age was 60 years, median tumor size was 15 mm, parenchyma-sparing surgery was performed in 42%. Postoperative mortality was 0.5% (n = 1), severe morbidity rate was 14.3% (n = 30), and 14 of 132 patients (10.6%) with harvested lymph nodes had metastatic lymph nodes. Tumor size, presence of biliary or pancreatic duct dilatation, and WHO grade 2-3 were independently associated with recurrence. Patients with tumors sized ≤10 mm were disease free at last follow-up. The 1-, 3- and 5-year disease-free survival rates for patients with tumors sized 11-20 mm on preoperative imaging were 95.1%, 91.0%, and 87.3%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In sNF-PNETs, the presence of biliary or pancreatic duct dilatation or WHO grade 2-3 advocate for surgical treatment. In the remaining patients, a wait-and-see policy might be considered.

23 Article Chemotherapy for Well-Differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours with a Ki-67 Index ≥10%: Is There a More Effective Antitumour Regimen? A Retrospective Multicentre Study of the French Group of Endocrine Tumours (GTE). 2018

Roquin, Guillaume / Baudin, Eric / Lombard-Bohas, Catherine / Cadiot, Guillaume / Dominguez, Sophie / Guimbaud, Rosine / Niccoli, Patricia / Legoux, Jean-Louis / Mitry, Emmanuel / Rohmer, Vincent / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Walter, Thomas / Ducreux, Michel / Couvelard, Anne / Scoazec, Jean-Yves / Ramond-Roquin, Aline / Caroli-Bosc, François-Xavier / Hentic, Olivia. ·Department of Hepatogastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, CHU Angers, Angers University, LUNAM University, Angers, France. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #28152531.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The best chemotherapy regimen for well- differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs) with a Ki-67 index ≥10% is still debated. We evaluated the antitumour efficacy of various first-line chemotherapy regimens (streptozocin based, platinum based, or dacarbazine/temozolomide based) in this situation. METHODS: In this retrospective multicentre study of the French Group of Endocrine Tumours (GTE), we recruited consecutive patients with advanced well-differentiated pNETs and a Ki-67 index ≥10% receiving chemotherapy between 2000 and 2012. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) according to RECIST. RESULTS: Seventy-four patients (42 men, median age 55.5 years) were enrolled from 10 centres. Fifty-one patients (69%) had grade 2 NET and 61 (82%) were stage IV. Median overall survival was 36.3 months. Forty-four patients (59%) received streptozocin-based, 18 (24%) platinum-based, and 12 (16%) dacarbazine/temozolomide-based chemotherapy regimens. These 3 groups were similar regarding age, functioning tumours, grade, the number of metastatic sites, and surgery for primary tumours, but not regarding surgery for metastases and time since diagnosis. Grade 3 NET (HR 2.15, 95% CI: 1.18-3.92, p = 0.012) and age above 55 years (HR 1.84, 95% CI: 1.06-3.18, p = 0.030) were associated with shorter median PFS in the multivariate analyses. Compared to streptozocin-based chemotherapy, no difference was found in terms of PFS for the platinum-based or for the dacarbazine/temozolomide-based chemotherapy regimen: median PFS was 7.2, 7.5, and 7.2 months, respectively (p = 0.51). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with intermediate or highly proliferative well-differentiated pNETs may benefit from 1 of the 3 chemotherapy regimens. Increased age and grade 3 were associated with shorter median PFS. Randomised studies searching for response predictors and the best efficacy-tolerance ratio are required to personalise the strategy.

24 Article Management of gastric neuro-endocrine tumours in a large French national cohort (GTE). 2017

Manfredi, Sylvain / Walter, Thomas / Baudin, Eric / Coriat, Romain / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Lecomte, Thierry / Laurenty, Anne-Pascale / Goichot, Bernard / Rohmer, Vincent / Roquin, Guillaume / Cojocarasu, Oana-Zvetlana / Lombard-Bohas, Catherine / Lepage, Côme / Morcet, Jeff / Cadiot, Guillaume. ·CHU Dijon, hepato-gastroenterology unit, University of Bourgogne Franche-Comté, INSERM, LNC UMR1231, F-21000, Dijon, France. sylvain.manfredi@chu-dijon.fr. · Département d'Oncologie Médicale, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, 69437, Lyon, cedex 03, France. · Gustave Roussy, Département d'Oncologie Endocrinienne, 94805, Villejuif cedex, France. · Department of Gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, Cochin Teaching Hospital, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. · Beaujon Hospital and Paris Diderot University, Clichy, France. · CHRU de Tours, service d'Hépato-Gastroenterologie, CNRS, UMR 7292, GICC & Université Francois-Rabelais, Tours, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse, France. · Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France. · Service d'endocrinologie et maladies métaboliques, CHU d'Angers, 4 rue Larrey, 49100, Angers, France. · Service d'Hépato-Gastro-Entérologie, CHU Angers, Angers, France. · CH Le Mans, Le Mans, France. · CHU Dijon, hepato-gastroenterology unit, University of Bourgogne Franche-Comté, INSERM, LNC UMR1231, F-21000, Dijon, France. · CIC, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes, France. · Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, Robert-Debré University Hospital, Reims, France. ·Endocrine · Pubmed #28664309.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Gastric neuro-endocrine tumours are rare. European guidelines for the management of neuro-endocrine tumours have been published in 2012. The aim of our survey was to study the management of gastric neuro-endocrine tumours registered in the national cohort. A prospective national cohort registers the Neuro-endocrine tumours in France since January 2003 (GTE network). We reviewed all the individual medical reports of gastric neuro-endocrine tumours in order to collect data on treatment. RESULTS: One hundred and ninety seven gastric neuro-endocrine tumours diagnosed between 1964 and 2013 in 20 centres were registered. For 181 cases data were considered complete for our survey. Eighty four tumours were type 1 (46.4%); five types 2 (2.8%); 52 types 3 (28.7%) and 40 types 4 (22.1%). Types 1 and 2 were first endoscopically managed in 93 and 60% of cases, respectively, whereas surgery was first done in 45 and 42%, respectively, of types 3 and 4. Systemic treatment, chemotherapy and/or somatostatin analogue, was first administered exclusively for types 3 and 4. Near 3% of types 1 and 40% of types 2 received at a time somatostatin analogue treatment. Five-year survival rates were 98.3, 100, 63.2 and 31.8% for types 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. CONCLUSION: The great majority of gastric neuro-endocrine tumours registered in this national cohort are treated in accordance with the current guidelines. The survival rates we reported must be interpreted with caution, because this cohort registered preferentially selected patients eligible for treatment. The registration of all the gastric neuro-endocrine tumours, in particular type 1 considered as benign and type 4 not eligible for specific anti-cancer treatment must be encouraged.

25 Article Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer in France: descriptive study from the French national hospital database. 2017

Maire, Frédérique / Cibot, Jean-Olivier / Compagne, Catherine / Hentic, Olivia / Hammel, Pascal / Muller, Nelly / Ponsot, Philippe / Levy, Philippe / Ruszniewski, Philippe. ·aGastroenterology-Pancreatology unit, Beaujon Hospital, Clichy, Paris-Diderot University bCustomizer, Paris cSigma-tau, Issy les, Moulineaux, France. ·Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #28471829.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Although indirect evidence suggests that the incidence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma has increased in the last decade, few data are available in European countries. The aim of the present study was to update the epidemiology of pancreatic cancer in France in 2014 from the French national hospital database (Programme de Médicalisation des Systèmes d'Information). PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients hospitalized for pancreatic cancer in France in 2014 in public or private institutions were included. Patient and stays (length, type of support, institutions) characteristics were studied. The results were compared with those observed in 2010. RESULTS: A total of 13 346 (52% men, median age 71 years) new patients were treated for pancreatic cancer in 2014, accounting for a 12.5% increase compared with 2010. Overall, 22% of patients were operated on. Liver metastases were present in 60% of cases. The disease accounted for 146 680 hospital stays (+24.8% compared with 2010), 76% of which were related to chemotherapy (+32%). The average annual number and length of stay were 7 and 2.6 days, respectively. In 2014, 11 052 deaths were reported (+15.8%). CONCLUSION: Approximately 13 350 new cases of pancreatic cancer were observed in France in 2014. The increase in incidence was associated with a marked increase in hospital stays for chemotherapy.

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