Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Corrado Rubini
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Corrado Rubini wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Positive neck margin at frozen section analysis is a significant predictor of tumour recurrence and poor survival after pancreatodudenectomy for pancreatic cancer. 2020

Crippa, Stefano / Guarneri, Giovanni / Belfiori, Giulio / Partelli, Stefano / Pagnanelli, Michele / Gasparini, Giulia / Balzano, Gianpaolo / Lena, Marco Schiavo / Rubini, Corrado / Doglioni, Claudio / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Falconi, Massimo. ·Division of Pancreatic Surgery, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, Università Vita Salute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Università Vita Salute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Università Politecnica Delle Marche, Ospedali Riuniti, Ancona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Ospedale Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria, Negrar, Italy. · Division of Pancreatic Surgery, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, Università Vita Salute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: falconi.massimo@hsr.it. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #32098733.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The possible benefit of frozen section (FS) analysis during (PD) for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and of additional resection up to total pancreatectomy (TP) is debated. Aim of this work is to evaluate the prognostic role of positive FS analysis after PD for PDAC. METHODS: Multicentric retrospective analysis on prospective databases of three institutions. Based on FS analysis patients were classified as FS negative/FS positive. All positive FS patients underwent extended PD (EPD) or TP. Postoperative outcomes, disease-free (DFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were evaluated. RESULTS: Of 371 patients, 58 (16%) had positive FS. This resulted in 313 (84%) SPD (standard pancreatoduodenectomy), 22 (6%) EPD and 36 (10%) TP. Postoperative mortality was higher in patients undergoing TP (11% compared to 4.5% in EPD and 1% in SPD; p = 0.01). 26% of patients underwent neoadjuvant therapy, and it did not decrease the rate of positive FS. Systemic/local relapse rates were 59% and 41% in negative FS group, and 78% and 22% in positive FS group (p = 0.031). Median DFS and DSS were 20 and 37 months in negative FS group, and 12 and 23 months in positive FS patients (p = 0.001). Independent predictors of recurrence were G3, N1/N2 status and positive FS. R1 resection, G3, N1/N2 status, perineural invasion and positive FS were independent predictors of DSS. CONCLUSIONS: Positive FS analysis is a poor prognostic factor after PD for PDAC. It is significantly associated with a high rate of R1 resection at final histology, PDAC recurrence and poor survival.

2 Article The size of well differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors correlates with Ki67 proliferative index and is not associated with age. 2019

Partelli, Stefano / Muffatti, Francesca / Rancoita, Paola Maria Vittoria / Andreasi, Valentina / Balzano, Gianpaolo / Crippa, Stefano / Doglioni, Claudio / Rubini, Corrado / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Falconi, Massimo. ·Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, "Vita-Salute" University, Milan, Italy. · University Centre for Statistics in the Biomedical Sciences, "Vita-Salute" University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, "Vita-Salute" University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Polytechnic University of Marche Region, Ancona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, "Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria" Hospital, Negrar, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, "Vita-Salute" University, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: falconi.massimo@hsr.it. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #30723019.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Concerns exist about a conservative management of well-differentiated nonfunctioning small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NF-PanNET) in young patients and when preoperative Ki67 proliferative index is ≥3%. AIM: To evaluate an association between age, tumor size and grading in patients with sporadic NF-PanNET who underwent curative resection. METHODS: Patients who underwent surgery for sporadic NF-PanNET (excluding G3) were retrospectively analyzed. Linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate a possible correlation between continuous variables, whereas multiple logistic regression analysis was performed for determining predictors of NF-PanNET-G2. RESULTS: Overall, 235 patients with NF-PanNET-G1/G2 were included. The median largest radiological diameter was 25 mm. Age correlated neither with tumor size (P = 0.675) nor with Ki67 index (P = 0.376). On multivariate linear regression analysis, factors independently associated with Ki67 index were NF-PanNET size (P = 0.031), perineural invasion (P = 0.004), microvascular invasion (P = 0.001) and necrosis (P = 0.009). The most accurate NF-PanNET size for predicting NF-PanNET-G2 was 25 mm. On multivariate analysis, a NF-PanNET size >25 mm was independently associated with the risk of having a PanNET-G2 (P = 0.025). CONCLUSION: No correlations exist between age and NF-PanNET size or proliferative index. Therefore, an a priori aggressive attitude is not justified in young patients with small NF-PanNET, as a long-life expectancy is probably unlikely to increase the risk of malignant transformation.

3 Article Competitive Testing of the WHO 2010 versus the WHO 2017 Grading of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: Data from a Large International Cohort Study. 2018

Rindi, Guido / Klersy, Catherine / Albarello, Luca / Baudin, Eric / Bianchi, Antonio / Buchler, Markus W / Caplin, Martyn / Couvelard, Anne / Cros, Jérôme / de Herder, Wouter W / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Doglioni, Claudio / Federspiel, Birgitte / Fischer, Lars / Fusai, Giuseppe / Gavazzi, Francesca / Hansen, Carsten P / Inzani, Frediano / Jann, Henning / Komminoth, Paul / Knigge, Ulrich P / Landoni, Luca / La Rosa, Stefano / Lawlor, Rita T / Luong, Tu V / Marinoni, Ilaria / Panzuto, F / Pape, Ulrich-Frank / Partelli, Stefano / Perren, Aurel / Rinzivillo, Maria / Rubini, Corrado / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Scarpa, Aldo / Schmitt, Anja / Schinzari, Giovanni / Scoazec, Jean-Yves / Sessa, Fausto / Solcia, Enrico / Spaggiari, Paola / Toumpanakis, Christos / Vanoli, Alessandro / Wiedenmann, Bertram / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Zandee, Wouter T / Zerbi, Alessandro / Falconi, Massimo. ·Institute of Pathology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma-Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italyguido.rindi@unicatt.it. · Service of Biometry and Clinical Epidemiology, Research Department, and IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. · Pathology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Cancer Campus, Villejuif, France. · Department of Endocrinology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma-Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Neu Heidelberg, Germany. · Neuroendocrine Tumour Unit, Centre for Gastroenterology, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Hopital Beaujon, Paris ENETS Center of Excellence, Clichy, France. · Section Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center and and Erasmus MC Cancer Institute Rotterdam, Rotterdam ENETS Center of Excellence, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea University Hospital, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen ENETS Center of Excellence, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, University College, Royal Free Hospital, London ENETS Center of Excellence, London, United Kingdom. · Pancreatic Surgery, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Humanitas Milan ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen ENETS Center of Excellence, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Institute of Pathology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma-Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Charité, Campus Virchow Klinikum and Charite Mitte, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin ENETS Center of Excellence, Berlin, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Stadtspital Triemli, Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, General and Pancreatic Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, Verona ENETS Center of Excellence, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Ospedale di Circolo, Università dell'Insubria, Varese, Italy. · Section of Pathology and ARC-Net Research Centre, Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona ENETS Center of Excellence, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University College, Royal Free Hospital, London ENETS Center of Excellence, London, United Kingdom. · Institute of Pathology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Marche Polytechnic University, Ancona, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Hopital Beaujon, Paris ENETS Center of Excellence, Clichy, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma-Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Department of Medical Biology and Pathology, Cancer Campus, Villejuif, France. · Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · Pathology Department, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Humanitas Milan ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar, Italy. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #30300897.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization (WHO) and the American Joint Cancer Committee (AJCC) modified the grading of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms from a three-tier (WHO-AJCC 2010) to a four-tier system by introducing the novel category of NET G3 (WHO-AJCC 2017). OBJECTIVES: This study aims at validating the WHO-AJCC 2017 and identifying the most effective grading system. METHOD: A total of 2,102 patients were enrolled; entry criteria were: (i) patient underwent surgery; (ii) at least 2 years of follow-up; (iii) observation time up to 2015. Data from 34 variables were collected; grading was assessed and compared for efficacy by statistical means including Kaplan-Meier method, Cox regression analysis, Harrell's C statistics, and Royston's explained variation in univariable and multivariable analyses. RESULTS: In descriptive analysis, the two grading systems demonstrated statistically significant differences for the major category sex but not for age groups. In Cox regression analysis, both grading systems showed statistically significant differences between grades for OS and EFS; however, no statistically significant difference was observed between the two G3 classes of WHO-AJCC 2017. In multivariable analysis for the two models fitted to compare efficacy, the two grading systems performed equally well with substantially similar optimal discrimination and well-explained variation for both OS and EFS. The WHO-AJCC 2017 grading system retained statistically significant difference between the two G3 classes for OS but not for EFS. CONCLUSIONS: The WHO-AJCC 2017 grading system is at least equally performing as the WHO-AJCC 2010 but allows the successful identification of the most aggressive PanNET subgroup. Grading is confirmed as probably the most powerful tool for predicting patient survival.

4 Article Impact of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) single nucleotide polymorphisms on outcome in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2018

Berardi, Rossana / Torniai, Mariangela / Partelli, Stefano / Rubini, Corrado / Pagliaretta, Silvia / Savini, Agnese / Polenta, Vanessa / Santoni, Matteo / Giampieri, Riccardo / Onorati, Sofia / Barucca, Federica / Murrone, Alberto / Bianchi, Francesca / Falconi, Massimo. ·Clinica di Oncologia Medica, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti di Ancona, Ancona, Italy. · Chirurgia del Pancreas, Ospedale San Raffaele IRCCS, Università Vita e Salute, Milano, Italy. · Section of Pathological Anatomy and Histopathology, Deparment of Neuroscience, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti di Ancona, Ancona, Italy. · Dipartimento di Chirurgia Generale, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti di Ancona, Ancona, Italy. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #29787601.

ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis represents a key event in cancer development, leading to local invasion e metastatization, and might be considered a basic feature in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) with a high expression of angiogenic molecules. We aimed to analyze the prognostic and predictive role of angiogenic factors in GEP-NENs through the analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of VEGF-A, VEGFR2 and VEGFR3. The genomic DNA of 58 consecutive patients with GEP-NENs treated at our Institution was extracted from peripheral blood. Two SNPs were identified respectively in VEGF-A (rs2010963G>C, rs699947A>C), VEGFR-2 (rs2305948C>T, rs1870377T>A), and VEGFR-3 (rs307821T>C, rs307826C>A) gene. Gene polymorphisms were determined by Real-Time PCR using TaqMan assays. Median age was 57 years (range 24-79 years); 32 patients were male and 77.5% of NENs were localized in the pancreas. The allele frequency of VEGFR-2 rs2305948T and of VEGF-A rs2010963C showed a trend of higher frequency than in general population (12.1% vs. 8.0% and 34.5% vs. 31.2%, respectively). Three out SNPs (VEGF-A rs699947C, VEGF-A rs2010963GC and VEGFR-3 rs307821C) showed a correlation with an increased risk of disease relapse. Moreover median PFS changes according to the presence of 0-1 SNPs (20.7% of cases; 61.9 months), 2 SNPs (25.9%; 49.2 months) and 3 SNPs (53.4%; 27.8 months) (p = 0.034). Results suggest, for the first time, that specific SNPs in VEGF-A and VEGFR-3 correlate with poor prognosis in GEP-NENs. The identification of this new prognostic factor might be helpful in order to optimize the management of these heterogeneous neoplasms.

5 Article mTOR inhibitors response and mTOR pathway in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2016

Falletta, Simona / Partelli, Stefano / Rubini, Corrado / Nann, Dominik / Doria, Andrea / Marinoni, Ilaria / Polenta, Vanessa / Di Pasquale, Carmelina / Degli Uberti, Ettore / Perren, Aurel / Falconi, Massimo / Zatelli, Maria Chiara. ·Department of Medical ScienceSection of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery UnitPancreas Translational and Research Institute, San Raffaele Hospital, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Biomedical Sciences and Public HealthPolytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy. · Institut fur PathologieUniversity of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. · Department of Medical ScienceSection of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy ztlmch@unife.it. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #27697900.

ABSTRACT: Medical therapy of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (P-NET) may take advantage of Everolimus treatment. However, the extent of therapeutic response cannot be predicted. This study was aimed to identify the possible predictive markers of response to Everolimus in P-NET. We found that Everolimus reduced the cell viability and induced apoptosis in primary cultures of 6 P-NET (P-NET-R), where the proliferative and antiapoptotic effects of IGF1 were blocked by Everolimus. On the contrary, 14 P-NET primary cultures (P-NET-NR) were resistant to Everolimus and IGF1, suggesting an involvement of PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in the mechanism of resistance. The response to Everolimus in vitro was associated with an active AKT/mTOR pathway and seemed to be associated with a greater clinical aggressiveness. In addition, a patient sensitive to Everolimus in vitro was sensitive to this drug in vivo also and showed a positive p-AKT immunohistochemistry (IHC) at tissue level. Similarly, a patient resistant to Everolimus treatment after surgery was not sensitive to the drug in vitro and had a negative p-AKT IHC staining. Therefore, present data confirm that P-NET primary cultures may be considered a model for testing medical treatment efficacy and that IHC characterization of p-AKT might help in identifying human P-NET who can benefit from Everolimus treatment. These data encourage conducting a prospective multicenter study involving different groups of P-NET patients treated with Everolimus.

6 Article Risk of misdiagnosis and overtreatment in patients with main pancreatic duct dilatation and suspected combined/main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. 2016

Crippa, Stefano / Pergolini, Ilaria / Rubini, Corrado / Castelli, Paola / Partelli, Stefano / Zardini, Claudio / Marchesini, Giorgia / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Falconi, Massimo. ·Department of Surgery, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Ospedali Riuniti, Ancona, Italy. · Department of Biomedical Sciences and Public Health, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Ospedali Riuniti, Ancona, Italy. · Division of Pathology, Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar, Italy. · General Surgery, Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar, Italy. · Division of Pathology, Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar, Italy; Department of Pathology, Università di Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, Ospedali Riuniti, Ancona, Italy. Electronic address: falconi.massimo@hsr.it. ·Surgery · Pubmed #26704784.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Segmental/diffuse dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) is the typical feature of combined/main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (CMD-IPMNs). MPD dilation in IPMNs may be also expression of mucus hypersecretion/obstructive chronic pancreatitis (OCP). The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence and extension of MPD involvement by tumor/OCP and assess the risk of overtreatment. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of suspected CMD-IPMNs resected between January 2009 and October 2014 were included. Pathologic correlations among MPD dilatation, IPMN, and OCP was searched. RESULTS: Overall, 93 patients were resected for suspected CMD-IPMNs. At pathology, CMD-IPMNs were found in 69 patients (74%). Branch-duct IPMNs (BD-IPMNs) were found in 8 cases (9%), pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in absence of IPMN in 9 (10%), cystic neuroendocrine tumor (NET G2) in 1 (1%), serous cystadenoma in 2 (2%), and OCP alone/mucinous metaplasia in 4 patients (4%). Overall, 18 patients (19%) underwent an overtreatment because unnecessary (2 BD-IPMNs, 2 serous cystadenomas, and 4 OCPs only) or too extensive resections (9 CMD-IPMNs and 1 PDAC with associated OCP). In these, total pancreatectomy was the most common procedure (67%). Median size of MPD in IPMN-involved area was 12 mm compared with 7 mm when only OCP was found (P < .05). CONCLUSION: There is a considerable risk of overtreatment in patients with a preoperative morphologic diagnosis of CMD-IPMNs. Partial pancreatectomy with margin examination should be performed instead of upfront total pancreatectomy. Radiologic observation can be considered in asymptomatic patients with "worrisome" MPD dilatation (5-9 mm) and lacking other high-risk stigmata.

7 Article Endoscopic ultrasound diagnosis of a primary hepatoid carcinoma of the pancreas. 2015

Antonini, Filippo / Angelelli, Lucia / Rubini, Corrado / Macarri, Giampiero. ·Department of Gastroenterology, A. Murri Hospital, Polytechnic University of Marche, Fermo, Italy. · Medical Oncology, Mazzoni Hospital, Ascoli Piceno, Italy. · Pathological Anatomy and Histopathology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Public Health, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy. ·Endoscopy · Pubmed #26262449.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --