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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Isabelle Romieu
Based on 6 articles published since 2010
(Why 6 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, I. Romieu wrote the following 6 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Circulating plasma phospholipid fatty acids and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large European cohort. 2018

Matejcic, M / Lesueur, F / Biessy, C / Renault, A L / Mebirouk, N / Yammine, S / Keski-Rahkonen, P / Li, K / Hémon, B / Weiderpass, E / Rebours, V / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Carbonnel, F / Kaaks, R / Katzke, V / Kuhn, T / Boeing, H / Trichopoulou, A / Palli, D / Agnoli, C / Panico, S / Tumino, R / Sacerdote, C / Quirós, J R / Duell, E J / Porta, M / Sánchez, M J / Chirlaque, M D / Barricarte, A / Amiano, P / Ye, W / Peeters, P H / Khaw, K T / Perez-Cornago, A / Key, T J / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Riboli, E / Vineis, P / Romieu, I / Gunter, M J / Chajès, V. ·International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Genetic Epidemiology of Cancer team, Inserm, U900, Paris, France. · Institut Curie, Paris, France. · PSL University, Paris, France. · Mines ParisTech, Fontainebleau, France. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research institute, San Sebastian, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, University Paris 7, Clichy, France. · INSERM, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Health across Generations Team, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Université Paris Sud, UMRS, Villejuif, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, Bicêtre University Hospital, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE), Nuthetal, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute - ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Clinical Medicine and Surgery Department, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, ASP, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, Ragusa, Italy. · Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Citta' della Salute e della Scienza Hospital, University of Turin and Centre for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Turin, Italy. · EPIC Asturias, Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital del Mar Research Institute - IMIM, CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) and Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública. Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA. Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain. · CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Department of Health and Social Sciences, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), Pamplona, Spain. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · MRC-PHE Center for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30110135.

ABSTRACT: There are both limited and conflicting data on the role of dietary fat and specific fatty acids in the development of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we investigated the association between plasma phospholipid fatty acids and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The fatty acid composition was measured by gas chromatography in plasma samples collected at recruitment from375 incident pancreatic cancer cases and375 matched controls. Associations of specific fatty acids with pancreatic cancer risk were evaluated using multivariable conditional logistic regression models with adjustment for established pancreatic cancer risk factors. Statistically significant inverse associations were found between pancreatic cancer incidence and levels of heptadecanoic acid (OR

2 Article Flavonoid and lignan intake and pancreatic cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort. 2016

Molina-Montes, Esther / Sánchez, María-José / Zamora-Ros, Raul / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Wark, Petra A / Obon-Santacana, Mireia / Kühn, Tilman / Katzke, Verena / Travis, Ruth C / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Naccarati, Alessio / Mattiello, Amalia / Krogh, Vittorio / Martorana, Caterina / Masala, Giovanna / Amiano, Pilar / Huerta, José-María / Barricarte, Aurelio / Quirós, José-Ramón / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Angell Åsli, Lene / Skeie, Guri / Ericson, Ulrika / Sonestedt, Emily / Peeters, Petra H / Romieu, Isabelle / Scalbert, Augustin / Overvad, Kim / Clemens, Matthias / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Peppa, Eleni / Vidalis, Pavlos / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Olsen, Anja / Tjønneland, Anne / Boutroun-Rualt, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Cross, Amanda J / Lu, Yunxia / Riboli, Elio / Duell, Eric J. ·Andalusian School of Public Health, Instituto De Investigación Biosanitaria Ibs, GRANADA, Hospitales Universitarios De Granada/Universidad De Granada, Granada, Spain. · CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiología Y Salud Pública, Spain. · Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, the School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, the School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-Idibell), Barcelona, Spain. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, HuGeF-Human Genetics Foundation, Torino, Italy. · Dipartimento Di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Registry ASP, Ragusa, Italy. · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastián, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Public Health Institute of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology, and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Epidemiology Unit, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Inserm, CESP Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, France. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #27184434.

ABSTRACT: Despite the potential cancer preventive effects of flavonoids and lignans, their ability to reduce pancreatic cancer risk has not been demonstrated in epidemiological studies. Our aim was to examine the association between dietary intakes of flavonoids and lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. A total of 865 exocrine pancreatic cancer cases occurred after 11.3 years of follow-up of 477,309 cohort members. Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake was estimated through validated dietary questionnaires and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Phenol Explorer databases. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using age, sex and center-stratified Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for energy intake, body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol and diabetes status. Our results showed that neither overall dietary intake of flavonoids nor of lignans were associated with pancreatic cancer risk (multivariable-adjusted HR for a doubling of intake = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.95-1.11 and 1.02; 95% CI: 0.89-1.17, respectively). Statistically significant associations were also not observed by flavonoid subclasses. An inverse association between intake of flavanones and pancreatic cancer risk was apparent, without reaching statistical significance, in microscopically confirmed cases (HR for a doubling of intake = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.91-1.00). In conclusion, we did not observe an association between intake of flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses or lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the EPIC cohort.

3 Article The association of circulating adiponectin levels with pancreatic cancer risk: a study within the prospective EPIC cohort. 2012

Grote, Verena A / Rohrmann, Sabine / Dossus, Laure / Nieters, Alexandra / Halkjaer, Jytte / Tjønneland, Anne / Overvad, Kim / Stegger, Jakob / Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Teucher, Birgit / Becker, Susen / Montonen, Jukka / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Lagiou, Pagona / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Palli, Domenico / Sieri, Sabina / Tumino, Rosario / Vineis, Paolo / Mattiello, Amalia / Argüelles, Marcial / Duell, Eric J / Molina-Montes, Esther / Larrañaga, Nerea / Chirlaque, María-Dolores / Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte / Jeurnink, Suzanne M / Peeters, Petra Hm / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Lindkvist, Björn / Johansen, Dorthe / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Crowe, Francesca L / Romieu, Isabelle / Rinaldi, Sabina / Jenab, Mazda / Romaguera, Dora / Michaud, Dominique S / Riboli, Elio / Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H / Kaaks, Rudolf. ·German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #21681743.

ABSTRACT: Excess body weight and type 2 diabetes mellitus, risk factors of pancreatic cancer, are characterized by decreased levels of adiponectin. In addition to anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative actions, adiponectin has an important role in regulating glucose metabolism, i.e., decreasing circulating blood glucose levels. Prospectively, hyperglycemia has been associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of pre-diagnostic adiponectin levels with pancreatic cancer risk. We conducted a case-control study nested within European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Blood samples of 452 pancreatic cancer cases and 452 individually matched controls were analyzed by immunoassays. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Overall, adiponectin showed no association with pancreas cancer risk; however, among never smokers, higher circulating levels of adiponectin were associated with a reduction in pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 0.44 [95% CI 0.23-0.82] for highest vs. lowest quartile), whereas among current smokers there was no significant association (OR = 1.59 [95% CI 0.67-3.76] for highest vs. lowest quartile; p-trend = 0.530; p-interaction = 0.309). In our study, lower adiponectin concentrations may be associated with the development of pancreatic cancer among never smokers, whereas the only other prospective study being conducted so far showed a decrease in risk among male smokers. Therefore, further studies are needed to clarify the role of adiponectin in pancreatic cancer development.

4 Article Diabetes mellitus, glycated haemoglobin and C-peptide levels in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. 2011

Grote, V A / Rohrmann, S / Nieters, A / Dossus, L / Tjønneland, A / Halkjær, J / Overvad, K / Fagherazzi, G / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Morois, S / Teucher, B / Becker, S / Sluik, D / Boeing, H / Trichopoulou, A / Lagiou, P / Trichopoulos, D / Palli, D / Pala, V / Tumino, R / Vineis, P / Panico, S / Rodríguez, L / Duell, E J / Molina-Montes, E / Dorronsoro, M / Huerta, J M / Ardanaz, E / Jeurnink, S M / Beulens, J W J / Peeters, P H M / Sund, M / Ye, W / Lindkvist, B / Johansen, D / Khaw, K T / Wareham, N / Allen, N / Crowe, F / Jenab, M / Romieu, I / Michaud, D S / Riboli, E / Romaguera, D / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Kaaks, R. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology c020, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ·Diabetologia · Pubmed #21953276.

ABSTRACT: AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: There has been long-standing debate about whether diabetes is a causal risk factor for pancreatic cancer or a consequence of tumour development. Prospective epidemiological studies have shown variable relationships between pancreatic cancer risk and blood markers of glucose and insulin metabolism, overall and as a function of lag times between marker measurements (blood donation) and date of tumour diagnosis. METHODS: Pre-diagnostic levels of HbA(1c) and C-peptide were measured for 466 participants with pancreatic cancer and 466 individually matched controls within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs for pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: Pancreatic cancer risk gradually increased with increasing pre-diagnostic HbA(1c) levels up to an OR of 2.42 (95% CI 1.33, 4.39 highest [≥ 6.5%, 48 mmol/mol] vs lowest [≤ 5.4%, 36 mmol/mol] category), even for individuals with HbA(1c) levels within the non-diabetic range. C-peptide levels showed no significant relationship with pancreatic cancer risk, irrespective of fasting status. Analyses showed no clear trends towards increasing hyperglycaemia (as marked by HbA(1c) levels) or reduced pancreatic beta cell responsiveness (as marked by C-peptide levels) with decreasing time intervals from blood donation to cancer diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our data on HbA(1c) show that individuals who develop exocrine pancreatic cancer tend to have moderate increases in HbA(1c) levels, relatively independently of obesity and insulin resistance-the classic and major risk factors for type 2 diabetes. While there is no strong difference by lag time, more data are needed on this in order to reach a firm conclusion.

5 Article A U-shaped relationship between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2011

Chuang, Shu-Chun / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Ueland, Per Magne / Vollset, Stein Emil / Midttun, Øivind / Olsen, Anja / Tjønneland, Anne / Overvad, Kim / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Morois, Sophie / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Teucher, Birgit / Kaaks, Rudolf / Weikert, Cornelia / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Benetou, Vassiliki / Naska, Androniki / Jenab, Mazda / Slimani, Nadia / Romieu, Isabelle / Michaud, Dominique S / Palli, Domenico / Sieri, Sabina / Panico, Salvatore / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Tumino, Rosario / Skeie, Guri / Duell, Eric J / Rodriguez, Laudina / Molina-Montes, Esther / Huerta, José Marı A / Larrañaga, Nerea / Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte / Johansen, Dorthe / Manjer, Jonas / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Peeters, Petra H M / Jeurnink, Suzanne / Wareham, Nicholas / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Crowe, Francesca / Riboli, Elio / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Vineis, Paolo. ·School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #21411310.

ABSTRACT: Folate intake has shown an inverse association with pancreatic cancer; nevertheless, results from plasma measurements were inconsistent. The aim of this study is to examine the association between plasma total homocysteine, methionine, folate, cobalamin, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We conducted a nested case-control study in the EPIC cohort, which has an average of 9.6 years of follow-up (1992-2006), using 463 incident pancreatic cancer cases. Controls were matched to each case by center, sex, age (± 1 year), date (± 1 year) and time (± 3 h) at blood collection and fasting status. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for education, smoking status, plasma cotinine concentration, alcohol drinking, body mass index and diabetes status. We observed a U-shaped association between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk. The ORs for plasma folate ≤ 5, 5-10, 10-15 (reference), 15-20, and > 20 nmol/L were 1.58 (95% CI=0.72-3.46), 1.39 (0.93-2.08), 1.0 (reference), 0.79 (0.52-1.21), and 1.34 (0.89-2.02), respectively. Methionine was associated with an increased risk in men (per quintile increment: OR=1.17, 95% CI=1.00-1.38) but not in women (OR=0.91, 95% CI=0.78-1.07; p for heterogeneity <0.01). Our results suggest a U-shaped association between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk in both men and women. The positive association that we observed between methionine and pancreatic cancer may be sex dependent and may differ by time of follow-up. However, the mechanisms behind the observed associations warrant further investigation.

6 Article Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in childhood and incidence of cancer in adulthood in never smokers in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2011

Chuang, Shu-Chun / Gallo, Valentina / Michaud, Dominique / Overvad, Kim / Tjønneland, Anne / Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise / Romieu, Isabelle / Straif, Kurt / Palli, Domenico / Pala, Valeria / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Panico, Salvatore / Peeters, Petra H / Lund, Eiliv / Gram, Inger Torhild / Manjer, Jonas / Borgquist, Signe / Riboli, Elio / Vineis, Paolo. ·School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, W2 1PG, London, UK. s-c.chuang@imperial.ac.uk ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #21279734.

ABSTRACT: The association between childhood environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure and adult cancer risk is controversial; we examined this relationship in never smokers within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Over an average of 10 years, 8,372 cases of cancer were diagnosed in 112,430 never smokers in EPIC. Childhood ETS was self-reported by participants at baseline, along with other lifestyle factors. Hazard ratios (HR) for ETS exposure in childhood and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards models stratified by age, sex, and study center and adjusted for education, alcohol drinking, body mass index, physical activity, non-alcoholic energy intake, fruit and vegetable intake, and adulthood ETS exposure. Models were further adjusted for reproductive factors for female cancers, for meat intake for digestive system cancers, and for diabetes status for pancreatic cancer. No association was observed between childhood ETS exposure and overall cancer risks (HR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.92-1.02), and for selected sites. The only exception was pancreatic cancer, as previously reported by Vrieling et al., among those who had been exposed daily in childhood (overall HR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.14-3.84). In conclusion, childhood ETS exposure might not be a major risk factor for common cancers in adulthood.