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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Laudina Rodríguez
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Laudina Rodriguez wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Meat and fish consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2013

Rohrmann, Sabine / Linseisen, Jakob / Nöthlings, Ute / Overvad, Kim / Egeberg, Rikke / Tjønneland, Anne / Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Cottet, Vanessa / Pala, Valeria / Tumino, Rosario / Palli, Domenico / Panico, Salvatore / Vineis, Paolo / Boeing, Heiner / Pischon, Tobias / Grote, Verena / Teucher, Birigit / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nicholas J / Crowe, Francesca L / Goufa, Ioulia / Orfanos, Philippos / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Jeurnink, Suzanne M / Siersema, Peter D / Peeters, Petra H M / Brustad, Magritt / Engeset, Dagrun / Skeie, Guri / Duell, Eric J / Amiano, Pilar / Barricarte, Aurelio / Molina-Montes, Esther / Rodríguez, Laudina / Tormo, María-José / Sund, Malin / Ye, Weimin / Lindkvist, Björn / Johansen, Dorthe / Ferrari, Pietro / Jenab, Mazda / Slimani, Nadia / Ward, Heather / Riboli, Elio / Norat, Teresa / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. sabine.rohrmann@ifspm.uzh.ch ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #22610753.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death worldwide with large geographical variation, which implies the contribution of diet and lifestyle in its etiology. We examined the association of meat and fish consumption with risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). A total of 477,202 EPIC participants from 10 European countries recruited between 1992 and 2000 were included in our analysis. Until 2008, 865 nonendocrine pancreatic cancer cases have been observed. Calibrated relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using multivariable-adjusted Cox hazard regression models. The consumption of red meat (RR per 50 g increase per day = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.93-1.14) and processed meat (RR per 50 g increase per day = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.71-1.23) were not associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk. Poultry consumption tended to be associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (RR per 50 g increase per day = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.04-2.84); however, there was no association with fish consumption (RR per 50 g increase per day = 1.22, 95% CI = 0.92-1.62). Our results do not support the conclusion of the World Cancer Research Fund that red or processed meat consumption may possibly increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. The positive association of poultry consumption with pancreatic cancer might be a chance finding as it contradicts most previous findings.

2 Article Plasma cotinine levels and pancreatic cancer in the EPIC cohort study. 2012

Leenders, Max / Chuang, Shu-Chun / Dahm, Christina C / Overvad, Kim / Ueland, Per Magne / Midttun, Oivind / Vollset, Stein Emil / Tjønneland, Anne / Halkjaer, Jytte / Jenab, Mazda / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Kaaks, Rudolf / Canzian, Federico / Boeing, Heiner / Weikert, Cornelia / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Bamia, Christina / Naska, Androniki / Palli, Domenico / Pala, Valeria / Mattiello, Amalia / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B / Peeters, Petra H M / van Gils, Carla H / Lund, Eiliv / Rodriguez, Laudina / Duell, Eric J / Pérez, María-José Sánchez / Molina-Montes, Esther / Castaño, José María Huerta / Barricarte, Aurelio / Larrañaga, Nerea / Johansen, Dorthe / Lindkvist, Björn / Sund, Malin / Ye, Weimin / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nicholas J / Michaud, Dominique S / Riboli, Elio / Xun, Wei W / Allen, Naomi E / Crowe, Francesca L / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Vineis, Paolo. ·School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. m.leenders-6@umcutrecht.nl ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #21953524.

ABSTRACT: Smoking is an established risk factor for pancreatic cancer, previously investigated by the means of questionnaires. Using cotinine as a biomarker for tobacco exposure allows more accurate quantitative analyses to be performed. This study on pancreatic cancer, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC cohort), included 146 cases and 146 matched controls. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, plasma cotinine levels were analyzed on average 8.0 years before cancer onset (5-95% range: 2.8-12.0 years). The relation between plasma cotinine levels and pancreatic cancer was analyzed with conditional logistic regression for different levels of cotinine in a population of never and current smokers. This was also done for the self-reported number of smoked cigarettes per day at baseline. Every increase of 350 nmol/L of plasma cotinine was found to significantly elevate risk of pancreatic cancer [odds ratio (OR): 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.60]. People with a cotinine level over 1187.8 nmol/L, a level comparable to smoking 17 cigarettes per day, have an elevated risk of pancreatic cancer, compared to people with cotinine levels below 55 nmol/L (OR: 3.66, 95% CI: 1.44-9.26). The results for self-reported smoking at baseline also show an increased risk of pancreatic cancer from cigarette smoking based on questionnaire information. People who smoke more than 30 cigarettes per day showed the highest risk compared to never smokers (OR: 4.15, 95% CI: 1.02-16.42). This study is the first to show that plasma cotinine levels are strongly related to pancreatic cancer.

3 Article A U-shaped relationship between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2011

Chuang, Shu-Chun / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Ueland, Per Magne / Vollset, Stein Emil / Midttun, Øivind / Olsen, Anja / Tjønneland, Anne / Overvad, Kim / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Morois, Sophie / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Teucher, Birgit / Kaaks, Rudolf / Weikert, Cornelia / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Benetou, Vassiliki / Naska, Androniki / Jenab, Mazda / Slimani, Nadia / Romieu, Isabelle / Michaud, Dominique S / Palli, Domenico / Sieri, Sabina / Panico, Salvatore / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Tumino, Rosario / Skeie, Guri / Duell, Eric J / Rodriguez, Laudina / Molina-Montes, Esther / Huerta, José Marı A / Larrañaga, Nerea / Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte / Johansen, Dorthe / Manjer, Jonas / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Peeters, Petra H M / Jeurnink, Suzanne / Wareham, Nicholas / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Crowe, Francesca / Riboli, Elio / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Vineis, Paolo. ·School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #21411310.

ABSTRACT: Folate intake has shown an inverse association with pancreatic cancer; nevertheless, results from plasma measurements were inconsistent. The aim of this study is to examine the association between plasma total homocysteine, methionine, folate, cobalamin, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We conducted a nested case-control study in the EPIC cohort, which has an average of 9.6 years of follow-up (1992-2006), using 463 incident pancreatic cancer cases. Controls were matched to each case by center, sex, age (± 1 year), date (± 1 year) and time (± 3 h) at blood collection and fasting status. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for education, smoking status, plasma cotinine concentration, alcohol drinking, body mass index and diabetes status. We observed a U-shaped association between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk. The ORs for plasma folate ≤ 5, 5-10, 10-15 (reference), 15-20, and > 20 nmol/L were 1.58 (95% CI=0.72-3.46), 1.39 (0.93-2.08), 1.0 (reference), 0.79 (0.52-1.21), and 1.34 (0.89-2.02), respectively. Methionine was associated with an increased risk in men (per quintile increment: OR=1.17, 95% CI=1.00-1.38) but not in women (OR=0.91, 95% CI=0.78-1.07; p for heterogeneity <0.01). Our results suggest a U-shaped association between plasma folate and pancreatic cancer risk in both men and women. The positive association that we observed between methionine and pancreatic cancer may be sex dependent and may differ by time of follow-up. However, the mechanisms behind the observed associations warrant further investigation.

4 Article A genome-wide association study identifies pancreatic cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 13q22.1, 1q32.1 and 5p15.33. 2010

Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey / Fuchs, Charles S / Kraft, Peter / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Jacobs, Kevin B / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gallinger, Steven / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Klein, Alison P / LaCroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Risch, Harvey A / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Bamlet, William R / Berg, Christine D / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Bracci, Paige M / Canzian, Federico / Clipp, Sandra / Cotterchio, Michelle / de Andrade, Mariza / Duell, Eric J / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hassan, Manal / Howard, Barbara / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Kooperberg, Charles / Krogh, Vittorio / Kurtz, Robert C / Lynch, Shannon M / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Michaud, Dominique S / Parikh, Hemang / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Rajkovic, Aleksandar / Riboli, Elio / Rodriguez, Laudina / Seminara, Daniela / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Thomas, Gilles / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Zhaoming / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Fraumeni, Joseph F / Hoover, Robert N / Hartge, Patricia / Chanock, Stephen J. ·Department of Health Sciences Research, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #20101243.

ABSTRACT: We conducted a genome-wide association study of pancreatic cancer in 3,851 affected individuals (cases) and 3,934 unaffected controls drawn from 12 prospective cohort studies and 8 case-control studies. Based on a logistic regression model for genotype trend effect that was adjusted for study, age, sex, self-described ancestry and five principal components, we identified eight SNPs that map to three loci on chromosomes 13q22.1, 1q32.1 and 5p15.33. Two correlated SNPs, rs9543325 (P = 3.27 x 10(-11), per-allele odds ratio (OR) 1.26, 95% CI 1.18-1.35) and rs9564966 (P = 5.86 x 10(-8), per-allele OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.13-1.30), map to a nongenic region on chromosome 13q22.1. Five SNPs on 1q32.1 map to NR5A2, and the strongest signal was at rs3790844 (P = 2.45 x 10(-10), per-allele OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.71-0.84). A single SNP, rs401681 (P = 3.66 x 10(-7), per-allele OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.11-1.27), maps to the CLPTM1L-TERT locus on 5p15.33, which is associated with multiple cancers. Our study has identified common susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer that warrant follow-up studies.