Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Kim Robien
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, K. Robien wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Central adiposity, obesity during early adulthood, and pancreatic cancer mortality in a pooled analysis of cohort studies. 2015

Genkinger, J M / Kitahara, C M / Bernstein, L / Berrington de Gonzalez, A / Brotzman, M / Elena, J W / Giles, G G / Hartge, P / Singh, P N / Stolzenberg-Solomon, R Z / Weiderpass, E / Adami, H-O / Anderson, K E / Beane-Freeman, L E / Buring, J E / Fraser, G E / Fuchs, C S / Gapstur, S M / Gaziano, J M / Helzlsouer, K J / Lacey, J V / Linet, M S / Liu, J J / Park, Y / Peters, U / Purdue, M P / Robien, K / Schairer, C / Sesso, H D / Visvanathan, K / White, E / Wolk, A / Wolpin, B M / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A / Jacobs, E J. ·Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York jg3081@columbia.edu. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda. · Division of Cancer Etiology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte. · Westat, Rockville. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council of Victoria, and Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Population Medicine and The Center for Health Research, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, USA. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, and Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta. · Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston. · The Prevention & Research Center, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda Division of Public Health Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis. · Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle. · Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore Department of Medical Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, John Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA. · Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Population Health and Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University, New York, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #26347100.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Body mass index (BMI), a measure of obesity typically assessed in middle age or later, is known to be positively associated with pancreatic cancer. However, little evidence exists regarding the influence of central adiposity, a high BMI during early adulthood, and weight gain after early adulthood on pancreatic cancer risk. DESIGN: We conducted a pooled analysis of individual-level data from 20 prospective cohort studies in the National Cancer Institute BMI and Mortality Cohort Consortium to examine the association of pancreatic cancer mortality with measures of central adiposity (e.g. waist circumference; n = 647 478; 1947 pancreatic cancer deaths), BMI during early adulthood (ages 18-21 years) and BMI change between early adulthood and cohort enrollment, mostly in middle age or later (n = 1 096 492; 3223 pancreatic cancer deaths). Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. RESULTS: Higher waist-to-hip ratio (HR = 1.09, 95% CI 1.02-1.17 per 0.1 increment) and waist circumference (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.00-1.14 per 10 cm) were associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer mortality, even when adjusted for BMI at baseline. BMI during early adulthood was associated with increased pancreatic cancer mortality (HR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.11-1.25 per 5 kg/m(2)), with increased risk observed in both overweight and obese individuals (compared with BMI of 21.0 to <23 kg/m(2), HR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.20-1.55 for BMI 25.0 < 27.5 kg/m(2), HR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.20-1.84 for BMI 27.5 to <30 kg/m(2), HR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.11-1.85 for BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)). BMI gain after early adulthood, adjusted for early adult BMI, was less strongly associated with pancreatic cancer mortality (HR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.10 per 5 kg/m(2)). CONCLUSIONS: Our results support an association between pancreatic cancer mortality and central obesity, independent of BMI, and also suggest that being overweight or obese during early adulthood may be important in influencing pancreatic cancer mortality risk later in life.

2 Review Dairy products and pancreatic cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies. 2014

Genkinger, J M / Wang, M / Li, R / Albanes, D / Anderson, K E / Bernstein, L / van den Brandt, P A / English, D R / Freudenheim, J L / Fuchs, C S / Gapstur, S M / Giles, G G / Goldbohm, R A / Håkansson, N / Horn-Ross, P L / Koushik, A / Marshall, J R / McCullough, M L / Miller, A B / Robien, K / Rohan, T E / Schairer, C / Silverman, D T / Stolzenberg-Solomon, R Z / Virtamo, J / Willett, W C / Wolk, A / Ziegler, R G / Smith-Warner, S A. ·Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York jg3081@columbia.edu. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. · Division of Cancer Etiology, Department of Population Science, Beckman Research Institute and City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council of Victoria, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo. · Division of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, USA. · Department of Prevention and Health, TNO Quality of Life, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. · Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, USA. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Health Services, George Washington University, Washington, DC. · Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #24631943.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer has few early symptoms, is usually diagnosed at late stages, and has a high case-fatality rate. Identifying modifiable risk factors is crucial to reducing pancreatic cancer morbidity and mortality. Prior studies have suggested that specific foods and nutrients, such as dairy products and constituents, may play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this pooled analysis of the primary data from 14 prospective cohort studies, 2212 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified during follow-up among 862 680 individuals. Adjusting for smoking habits, personal history of diabetes, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI), and energy intake, multivariable study-specific hazard ratios (MVHR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random effects model. There was no association between total milk intake and pancreatic cancer risk (MVHR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.82-1.18 comparing ≥500 with 1-69.9 g/day). Similarly, intakes of low-fat milk, whole milk, cheese, cottage cheese, yogurt, and ice-cream were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. No statistically significant association was observed between dietary (MVHR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.77-1.19) and total calcium (MVHR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.71-1.12) intake and pancreatic cancer risk overall when comparing intakes ≥1300 with <500 mg/day. In addition, null associations were observed for dietary and total vitamin D intake and pancreatic cancer risk. Findings were consistent within sex, smoking status, and BMI strata or when the case definition was limited to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall, these findings do not support the hypothesis that consumption of dairy foods, calcium, or vitamin D during adulthood is associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

3 Review Folate intake and risk of pancreatic cancer: pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies. 2011

Bao, Ying / Michaud, Dominique S / Spiegelman, Donna / Albanes, Demetrius / Anderson, Kristin E / Bernstein, Leslie / van den Brandt, Piet A / English, Dallas R / Freudenheim, Jo L / Fuchs, Charles S / Giles, Graham G / Giovannucci, Edward / Goldbohm, R Alexandra / Håkansson, Niclas / Horn-Ross, Pamela L / Jacobs, Eric J / Kitahara, Cari M / Marshall, James R / Miller, Anthony B / Robien, Kim / Rohan, Thomas E / Schatzkin, Arthur / Stevens, Victoria L / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wolk, Alicja / Ziegler, Regina G / Smith-Warner, Stephanie A. ·Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #22034634.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies evaluating the association between folate intake and risk of pancreatic cancer have produced inconsistent results. The statistical power to examine this association has been limited in previous studies partly because of small sample size and limited range of folate intake in some studies. METHODS: We analyzed primary data from 14 prospective cohort studies that included 319,716 men and 542,948 women to assess the association between folate intake and risk of pancreatic cancer. Folate intake was assessed through a validated food-frequency questionnaire at baseline in each study. Study-specific relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random effects model. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: During 7-20 years of follow-up across studies, 2195 pancreatic cancers were identified. No association was observed between folate intake and risk of pancreatic cancer in men and women (highest vs lowest quintile: dietary folate intake, pooled multivariable RR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.90 to 1.25, P(trend) = .47; total folate intake [dietary folate and supplemental folic acid], pooled multivariable RR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.80 to 1.16, P(trend) = .90). No between-study heterogeneity was observed (for dietary folate, P(heterogeneity) = .15; for total folate, P(heterogeneity) = .22). CONCLUSION: Folate intake was not associated with overall risk of pancreatic cancer in this large pooled analysis.

4 Article Vitamin D-binding protein and pancreatic cancer: a nested case-control study. 2015

Piper, Marina R / Freedman, D Michal / Robien, Kim / Kopp, William / Rager, Helen / Horst, Ronald L / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·From the Nutritional Epidemiology Branch (MRP and RZS-S) and the Radiation Epidemiology Branch (DMF), Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD · the Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Exercise Science, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC (KR) · the Clinical Support Laboratory, Leidos Biomedical Research Inc./Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD (WK and HR) · and Heartland Assays Inc., Iowa State University, Ames, IA (RLH). ·Am J Clin Nutr · Pubmed #25904602.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) is the primary carrier of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in the circulation. One prospective study in male smokers found a protective association between DBP and pancreatic cancer, particularly among men with higher 25(OH)D concentrations. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the association between DBP and pancreatic cancer risk in an American population. DESIGN: We conducted a nested case-control study in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer screening trial cohort of men and women aged 55-74 y at baseline. Between 1993 and 2010, 295 incident pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases were reported (follow-up to 15.1 y). Two controls (n = 590) were matched to each case by age, race, sex, and month of blood draw. We calculated smoking- and diabetes-adjusted ORs and 95% CIs with the use of conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: DBP concentration was not significantly associated with pancreatic cancer overall [highest (≥7149.4 nmol/L) vs. lowest (<3670.4 nmol/L) quintile; OR: 1.75; 95% CI: 0.91, 3.37; P-trend = 0.25]. For serum 25(OH)D compared with the referent (50 to <75 nmol/L), individuals in the highest group had a significantly higher risk (≥100 nmol/L; OR: 3.23; 95% CI: 1.24, 8.44), whereas those in the lowest group had no significant association (<25 nmol/L; OR: 2.50; 95% CI: 0.92, 6.81). Further adjustment for DBP did not alter this association. CONCLUSION: Our results do not support the hypothesis that serum DBP or 25(OH)D plays a protective role in pancreatic cancer. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00339495.

5 Article Intake of fruits and vegetables and risk of pancreatic cancer in a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies. 2012

Koushik, Anita / Spiegelman, Donna / Albanes, Demetrius / Anderson, Kristin E / Bernstein, Leslie / van den Brandt, Piet A / Bergkvist, Leif / English, Dallas R / Freudenheim, Jo L / Fuchs, Charles S / Genkinger, Jeanine M / Giles, Graham G / Goldbohm, R Alexandra / Horn-Ross, Pamela L / Männistö, Satu / McCullough, Marjorie L / Millen, Amy E / Miller, Anthony B / Robien, Kim / Rohan, Thomas E / Schatzkin, Arthur / Shikany, James M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Willett, Walter C / Wolk, Alicja / Ziegler, Regina G / Smith-Warner, Stephanie A. ·University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM), Montreal, Quebec, Canada. anita.koushik@umontreal.ca ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #22875754.

ABSTRACT: Fruit and vegetable intake may protect against pancreatic cancer, since fruits and vegetables are rich in potentially cancer-preventive nutrients. Most case-control studies have found inverse associations between fruit and vegetable intake and pancreatic cancer risk, although bias due to reporting error cannot be ruled out. In most prospective studies, inverse associations have been weaker and imprecise because of small numbers of cases. The authors examined fruit and vegetable intake in relation to pancreatic cancer risk in a pooled analysis of 14 prospective studies from North America, Europe, and Australia (study periods between 1980 and 2005). Relative risks and 2-sided 95% confidence intervals were estimated separately for the 14 studies using the Cox proportional hazards model and were then pooled using a random-effects model. Of 862,584 men and women followed for 7-20 years, 2,212 developed pancreatic cancer. The pooled multivariate relative risks of pancreatic cancer per 100-g/day increase in intake were 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99, 1.03) for total fruits and vegetables, 1.01 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.03) for total fruits, and 1.02 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.06) for total vegetables. Associations were similar for men and women separately and across studies. These results suggest that fruit and vegetable intake during adulthood is not associated with a reduced pancreatic cancer risk.

6 Article Coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink intake and pancreatic cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies. 2012

Genkinger, Jeanine M / Li, Ruifeng / Spiegelman, Donna / Anderson, Kristin E / Albanes, Demetrius / Bergkvist, Leif / Bernstein, Leslie / Black, Amanda / van den Brandt, Piet A / English, Dallas R / Freudenheim, Jo L / Fuchs, Charles S / Giles, Graham G / Giovannucci, Edward / Goldbohm, R Alexandra / Horn-Ross, Pamela L / Jacobs, Eric J / Koushik, Anita / Männistö, Satu / Marshall, James R / Miller, Anthony B / Patel, Alpa V / Robien, Kim / Rohan, Thomas E / Schairer, Catherine / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Wolk, Alicja / Ziegler, Regina G / Smith-Warner, Stephanie A. ·Mailman School of Public Health, 722 w 168th St, Rm 803, New York, NY 10032, USA. jg3081@columbia.edu ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #22194529.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Coffee has been hypothesized to have pro- and anticarcinogenic properties, whereas tea may contain anticarcinogenic compounds. Studies assessing coffee intake and pancreatic cancer risk have yielded mixed results, whereas findings for tea intake have mostly been null. Sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink (SSB) intake has been associated with higher circulating levels of insulin, which may promote carcinogenesis. Few prospective studies have examined SSB intake and pancreatic cancer risk; results have been heterogeneous. METHODS: In this pooled analysis from 14 prospective cohort studies, 2,185 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified among 853,894 individuals during follow-up. Multivariate (MV) study-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random-effects model. RESULTS: No statistically significant associations were observed between pancreatic cancer risk and intake of coffee (MVRR = 1.10; 95% CI, 0.81-1.48 comparing ≥900 to <0 g/d; 237g ≈ 8oz), tea (MVRR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.78-1.16 comparing ≥400 to 0 g/d; 237g ≈ 8oz), or SSB (MVRR = 1.19; 95% CI, 0.98-1.46 comparing ≥250 to 0 g/d; 355g ≈ 12oz; P value, test for between-studies heterogeneity > 0.05). These associations were consistent across levels of sex, smoking status, and body mass index. When modeled as a continuous variable, a positive association was evident for SSB (MVRR = 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.12). CONCLUSION AND IMPACT: Overall, no associations were observed for intakes of coffee or tea during adulthood and pancreatic cancer risk. Although we were only able to examine modest intake of SSB, there was a suggestive, modest positive association for risk of pancreatic cancer for intakes of SSB.

7 Article Nutrients, food groups, dietary patterns, and risk of pancreatic cancer in postmenopausal women. 2011

Inoue-Choi, Maki / Flood, Andrew / Robien, Kim / Anderson, Kristin. ·Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, 1300 S. Second Street, Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA. inou0021@umn.edu ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #21278328.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Identifying modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer is important because of its poor prognosis. Previous findings on diet are inconsistent. METHODS: Associations between intake of nutrients, food groups, dietary patterns, and pancreatic cancer risk were examined among 34,642 postmenopausal women in the Iowa Women's Health Study (IWHS). RESULTS: No significant associations were observed between intake of nutrients and food groups or dietary patterns and pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSION: Our findings do not support the hypothesis that fruits, vegetables, and red meat are associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. IMPACT: Dietary intake, assessed in multiple aspects in a large prospective cohort study, was not associated with pancreatic cancer.