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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by A. Gordon Robertson
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, A. Gordon Robertson wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Integrative Genomic Analysis of Cholangiocarcinoma Identifies Distinct IDH-Mutant Molecular Profiles. 2017

Farshidfar, Farshad / Zheng, Siyuan / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Newton, Yulia / Shih, Juliann / Robertson, A Gordon / Hinoue, Toshinori / Hoadley, Katherine A / Gibb, Ewan A / Roszik, Jason / Covington, Kyle R / Wu, Chia-Chin / Shinbrot, Eve / Stransky, Nicolas / Hegde, Apurva / Yang, Ju Dong / Reznik, Ed / Sadeghi, Sara / Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar / Ojesina, Akinyemi I / Hess, Julian M / Auman, J Todd / Rhie, Suhn K / Bowlby, Reanne / Borad, Mitesh J / Anonymous5350899 / Zhu, Andrew X / Stuart, Josh M / Sander, Chris / Akbani, Rehan / Cherniack, Andrew D / Deshpande, Vikram / Mounajjed, Taofic / Foo, Wai Chin / Torbenson, Michael S / Kleiner, David E / Laird, Peter W / Wheeler, David A / McRee, Autumn J / Bathe, Oliver F / Andersen, Jesper B / Bardeesy, Nabeel / Roberts, Lewis R / Kwong, Lawrence N. ·Departments of Surgery and Oncology, Arnie Charbonneau Cancer Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1, Canada. · Departments of Genomic Medicine, Melanoma Medical Oncology, Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Pathology, and Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. · The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA; Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215, USA. · Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4S6, Canada. · Center for Epigenetics, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, MI 49503, USA. · Departments of Genetics and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Blueprint Medicines, 38 Sidney Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. · Divisions of Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10005, USA. · University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA; HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, Huntsville, AL 35806, USA. · The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. · Departments of Genetics and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ 85054, USA. · Departments of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Departments of Pathology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, Department of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2200, Denmark. Electronic address: jesper.andersen@bric.ku.dk. · Departments of Pathology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: bardeesy.nabeel@mgh.harvard.edu. · Divisions of Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address: roberts.lewis@mayo.edu. · Departments of Genomic Medicine, Melanoma Medical Oncology, Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Pathology, and Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: lkwong@mdanderson.org. ·Cell Rep · Pubmed #28297679.

ABSTRACT: Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an aggressive malignancy of the bile ducts, with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Here, we describe the integrated analysis of somatic mutations, RNA expression, copy number, and DNA methylation by The Cancer Genome Atlas of a set of predominantly intrahepatic CCA cases and propose a molecular classification scheme. We identified an IDH mutant-enriched subtype with distinct molecular features including low expression of chromatin modifiers, elevated expression of mitochondrial genes, and increased mitochondrial DNA copy number. Leveraging the multi-platform data, we observed that ARID1A exhibited DNA hypermethylation and decreased expression in the IDH mutant subtype. More broadly, we found that IDH mutations are associated with an expanded histological spectrum of liver tumors with molecular features that stratify with CCA. Our studies reveal insights into the molecular pathogenesis and heterogeneity of cholangiocarcinoma and provide classification information of potential therapeutic significance.

2 Article Stiffness of pancreatic cancer cells is associated with increased invasive potential. 2016

Nguyen, Angelyn V / Nyberg, Kendra D / Scott, Michael B / Welsh, Alia M / Nguyen, Andrew H / Wu, Nanping / Hohlbauch, Sophia V / Geisse, Nicholas A / Gibb, Ewan A / Robertson, A Gordon / Donahue, Timothy R / Rowat, Amy C. ·Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA. rowat@ucla.edu. · Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA. rowat@ucla.edu and Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles, USA. · Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, USA. · Asylum Research, an Oxford Instruments Company, Santa Barbara, California, USA. · Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC, Canada. · Department of General Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, USA and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, USA. · Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA. rowat@ucla.edu and Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles, USA and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, USA. ·Integr Biol (Camb) · Pubmed #27761545.

ABSTRACT: Metastasis is a fundamentally physical process in which cells are required to deform through narrow gaps as they invade surrounding tissues and transit to distant sites. In many cancers, more invasive cells are more deformable than less invasive cells, but the extent to which mechanical phenotype, or mechanotype, can predict disease aggressiveness in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains unclear. Here we investigate the invasive potential and mechanical properties of immortalized PDAC cell lines derived from primary tumors and a secondary metastatic site, as well as noncancerous pancreatic ductal cells. To investigate how invasive behavior is associated with cell mechanotype, we flow cells through micron-scale pores using parallel microfiltration and microfluidic deformability cytometry; these results show that the ability of PDAC cells to passively transit through pores is only weakly correlated with their invasive potential. We also measure the Young's modulus of pancreatic ductal cells using atomic force microscopy, which reveals that there is a strong association between cell stiffness and invasive potential in PDAC cells. To determine the molecular origins of the variability in mechanotype across our PDAC cell lines, we analyze RNAseq data for genes that are known to regulate cell mechanotype. Our results show that vimentin, actin, and lamin A are among the most differentially expressed mechanoregulating genes across our panel of PDAC cell lines, as well as a cohort of 38 additional PDAC cell lines. We confirm levels of these proteins across our cell panel using immunoblotting, and find that levels of lamin A increase with both invasive potential and Young's modulus. Taken together, we find that stiffer PDAC cells are more invasive than more compliant cells, which challenges the paradigm that decreased cell stiffness is a hallmark of metastatic potential.