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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Guido Rindi
Based on 33 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, G. Rindi wrote the following 33 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Guideline ENETS Consensus Guidelines Update for the Management of Patients with Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors and Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors. 2016

Falconi, M / Eriksson, B / Kaltsas, G / Bartsch, D K / Capdevila, J / Caplin, M / Kos-Kudla, B / Kwekkeboom, D / Rindi, G / Klöppel, G / Reed, N / Kianmanesh, R / Jensen, R T / Anonymous1590854. · ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #26742109.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline Neuroendocrine gastroenteropancreatic tumours: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. 2010

Oberg, K / Akerström, G / Rindi, G / Jelic, S / Anonymous3170663. ·Department of Endocrine Oncology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #20555086.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Guideline ENETS Consensus Guidelines for the Standards of Care in Neuroendocrine Tumors: towards a standardized approach to the diagnosis of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and their prognostic stratification. 2009

Klöppel, Günter / Couvelard, Anne / Perren, Aurel / Komminoth, Paul / McNicol, Anne-Marie / Nilsson, Ola / Scarpa, Aldo / Scoazec, Jean-Yves / Wiedenmann, Bertram / Papotti, Mauro / Rindi, Guido / Plöckinger, Ursula / Anonymous1150617 / Anonymous1160617. ·Institut für Allgemeine Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie, Universität Kiel, DE-24105 Kiel, Germany. guenterkloeppel@path.uni-kiel.de ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #19060454.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial The ENETS and AJCC/UICC TNM classifications of the neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas: a statement. 2010

Klöppel, Günter / Rindi, Guido / Perren, Aurel / Komminoth, Paul / Klimstra, David S. · ·Virchows Arch · Pubmed #20422210.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review The New World Health Organization Classification for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasia. 2018

Inzani, Frediano / Petrone, Gianluigi / Rindi, Guido. ·Department of Anatomic Pathology, IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, Roma I-00168, Italy; Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, Roma I-00168, Italy; Gynecological and Breast Pathology Unit, IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, Roma I-00168, Italy. · Department of Anatomic Pathology, IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, Roma I-00168, Italy; Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, Roma I-00168, Italy; Anatomic Pathology Unit, IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, Roma I-00168, Italy. · Department of Anatomic Pathology, IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, Roma I-00168, Italy; Roma ENETS Center of Excellence, IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, Roma I-00168, Italy; Anatomic Pathology Unit, IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, Roma I-00168, Italy; Institute of Pathology, Università Cattolica-IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Largo A. Gemelli, 8, Roma I-00168, Italy. Electronic address: guido.rindi@unicatt.it. ·Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am · Pubmed #30098710.

ABSTRACT: Based on the 2010 version, the 2017 World Health Organization (WHO 2017) classification is for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNEN). The WHO 2017 classification introduces the novel well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor of high grade (NET G3). A sharp distinction between NET and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) is emphasized to highlight substantial biological differences. Further changes comprise the definition of mixed neuroendocrine non-neuroendocrine neoplasm (MiNEN), to accommodate all grades of both neoplasm components, and the abolition of preneoplastic lesions given their rarity in the pancreas. The 2017 American Joint Cancer Committee classification (AJCC 2017) adopts such a classification for all digestive sites.

6 Review Diagnostic performance of Gallium-68 somatostatin receptor PET and PET/CT in patients with thoracic and gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: a meta-analysis. 2012

Treglia, Giorgio / Castaldi, Paola / Rindi, Guido / Giordano, Alessandro / Rufini, Vittoria. ·Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Largo Gemelli, 8, 00168, Rome, Italy. giorgiomednuc@libero.it ·Endocrine · Pubmed #22350660.

ABSTRACT: RESULTS: Sixteen studies comprising 567 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SMSR PET or PET/CT in detecting NETs were 93% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 91-95%) and 91% (95% CI: 82-97%), respectively, on a per patient-based analysis. The area under the ROC curve was 0.96. In patients with suspicious thoracic and/or GEP NETs, SMSR PET and PET/CT demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity. These accurate techniques should be considered as first-line diagnostic imaging methods in patients with suspicious thoracic and/or GEP NETs.

7 Review Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the gut and pancreas: new insights. 2011

Rindi, Guido / Wiedenmann, Bertram. ·Institute of Pathology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore-Policlinico A. Gemelli, Largo A. Gemelli 8, I-00168 Rome, Italy. guido.rindi@rm.unicatt.it ·Nat Rev Endocrinol · Pubmed #21808296.

ABSTRACT: Neuroendocrine neoplasms arise in almost every organ of the body and are variably defined according to the site of origin. This Review focuses on neuroendocrine neoplasms of the digestive tract and pancreas. The 2010 WHO classification of tumors of the digestive system introduces grading and staging tools for neuroendocrine neoplasms. A carcinoid is now defined as a grade 1 or 2 neuroendocrine tumor and grade 3, small-cell or large-cell carcinomas are defined as neuroendocrine carcinoma. Epidemiological data show a worldwide increase in the prevalence and incidence of gastroentero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in the past few decades, which is probably due to improved methods of detection of these tumors. The current diagnostic procedures and treatment options for neuroendocrine neoplasms are defined and summarized in the Review, although evidence-based data are lacking. Surgery remains the treatment mainstay and somatostatin analogues the basis for both diagnosis and therapy as the only 'theranostic' tool. Emerging compounds including chemotherapeutic agents, small molecules and biological therapies may provide new hope for patients.

8 Review Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. 2008

Modlin, Irvin M / Oberg, Kjell / Chung, Daniel C / Jensen, Robert T / de Herder, Wouter W / Thakker, Rajesh V / Caplin, Martyn / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Kaltsas, Greg A / Krenning, Eric P / Moss, Steven F / Nilsson, Ola / Rindi, Guido / Salazar, Ramon / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Sundin, Anders. ·Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8062, USA. imodlin@optonline.net ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #18177818.

ABSTRACT: Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are fairly rare neoplasms that present many clinical challenges. They secrete peptides and neuroamines that cause distinct clinical syndromes, including carcinoid syndrome. However, many are clinically silent until late presentation with mass effects. Investigation and management should be highly individualised for a patient, taking into consideration the likely natural history of the tumour and general health of the patient. Management strategies include surgery for cure (which is achieved rarely) or for cytoreduction, radiological intervention (by chemoembolisation and radiofrequency ablation), chemotherapy, and somatostatin analogues to control symptoms that result from release of peptides and neuroamines. New biological agents and somatostatin-tagged radionuclides are under investigation. The complexity, heterogeneity, and rarity of GEP NETs have contributed to a paucity of relevant randomised trials and little or no survival increase over the past 30 years. To improve outcome from GEP NETs, a better understanding of their biology is needed, with emphasis on molecular genetics and disease modeling. More-reliable serum markers, better tumour localisation and identification of small lesions, and histological grading systems and classifications with prognostic application are needed. Comparison between treatments is currently very difficult. Progress is unlikely to occur without development of centers of excellence, with dedicated combined clinical teams to coordinate multicentre studies, maintain clinical and tissue databases, and refine molecularly targeted therapeutics.

9 Clinical Trial Anti-tumour effects of lanreotide for pancreatic and intestinal neuroendocrine tumours: the CLARINET open-label extension study. 2016

Caplin, Martyn E / Pavel, Marianne / Ćwikła, Jarosław B / Phan, Alexandria T / Raderer, Markus / Sedláčková, Eva / Cadiot, Guillaume / Wolin, Edward M / Capdevila, Jaume / Wall, Lucy / Rindi, Guido / Langley, Alison / Martinez, Séverine / Gomez-Panzani, Edda / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Anonymous721030. ·Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France m.caplin@ucl.ac.uk. · Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France. · Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #26743120.

ABSTRACT: In the CLARINET study, lanreotide Autogel (depot in USA) significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic pancreatic/intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). We report long-term safety and additional efficacy data from the open-label extension (OLE). Patients with metastatic grade 1/2 (Ki-67 ≤ 10%) non-functioning NET and documented baseline tumour-progression status received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg (n = 101) or placebo (n = 103) for 96 weeks or until death/progressive disease (PD) in CLARINET study. Patients with stable disease (SD) at core study end (lanreotide/placebo) or PD (placebo only) continued or switched to lanreotide in the OLE. In total, 88 patients (previously: lanreotide, n = 41; placebo, n = 47) participated: 38% had pancreatic, 39% midgut and 23% other/unknown primary tumours. Patients continuing lanreotide reported fewer adverse events (AEs) (all and treatment-related) during OLE than core study. Placebo-to-lanreotide switch patients reported similar AE rates in OLE and core studies, except more diarrhoea was considered treatment-related in OLE (overall diarrhoea unchanged). Median lanreotide PFS (core study randomisation to PD in core/OLE; n=101) was 32.8 months (95% CI: 30.9, 68.0). A sensitivity analysis, addressing potential selection bias by assuming that patients with SD on lanreotide in the core study and not entering the OLE (n=13) had PD 24 weeks after last core assessment, found median PFS remaining consistent: 30.8 months (95% CI: 30.0, 31.3). Median time to further PD after placebo-to-lanreotide switch (n=32) was 14.0 months (10.1; not reached). This OLE study suggests long-term treatment with lanreotide Autogel 120 mg maintained favourable safety/tolerability. CLARINET OLE data also provide new evidence of lanreotide anti-tumour benefits in indolent and progressive pancreatic/intestinal NETs.

10 Clinical Trial Lanreotide in metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2014

Caplin, Martyn E / Pavel, Marianne / Ćwikła, Jarosław B / Phan, Alexandria T / Raderer, Markus / Sedláčková, Eva / Cadiot, Guillaume / Wolin, Edward M / Capdevila, Jaume / Wall, Lucy / Rindi, Guido / Langley, Alison / Martinez, Séverine / Blumberg, Joëlle / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Anonymous1220800. ·From Royal Free Hospital, London (M.E.C.) · Charité University Medicine Berlin, Berlin (M.P.) · University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland (J.B.Ć.) · University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston (A.T.P.) · University Hospital, Vienna (M.R.) · Department of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic (E.S.) · Robert-Debré Hospital, Reims (G.C.), Ipsen, Les Ulis, (A.L., S.M., J.B.), Beaujon Hospital, Clichy (P.R.), and Paris Diderot University, Paris (P.R.) - all in France · Samuel Oschin Cancer Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles (E.M.W.) · Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona (J.C.) · Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (L.W.) · and Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (G.R.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #25014687.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Somatostatin analogues are commonly used to treat symptoms associated with hormone hypersecretion in neuroendocrine tumors; however, data on their antitumor effects are limited. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational study of the somatostatin analogue lanreotide in patients with advanced, well-differentiated or moderately differentiated, nonfunctioning, somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors of grade 1 or 2 (a tumor proliferation index [on staining for the Ki-67 antigen] of <10%) and documented disease-progression status. The tumors originated in the pancreas, midgut, or hindgut or were of unknown origin. Patients were randomly assigned to receive an extended-release aqueous-gel formulation of lanreotide (Autogel [known in the United States as Depot], Ipsen) at a dose of 120 mg (101 patients) or placebo (103 patients) once every 28 days for 96 weeks. The primary end point was progression-free survival, defined as the time to disease progression (according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.0) or death. Secondary end points included overall survival, quality of life (assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaires QLQ-C30 and QLQ-GI.NET21), and safety. RESULTS: Most patients (96%) had no tumor progression in the 3 to 6 months before randomization, and 33% had hepatic tumor volumes greater than 25%. Lanreotide, as compared with placebo, was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival (median not reached vs. median of 18.0 months, P<0.001 by the stratified log-rank test; hazard ratio for progression or death, 0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30 to 0.73). The estimated rates of progression-free survival at 24 months were 65.1% (95% CI, 54.0 to 74.1) in the lanreotide group and 33.0% (95% CI, 23.0 to 43.3) in the placebo group. The therapeutic effect in predefined subgroups was generally consistent with that in the overall population, with the exception of small subgroups in which confidence intervals were wide. There were no significant between-group differences in quality of life or overall survival. The most common treatment-related adverse event was diarrhea (in 26% of the patients in the lanreotide group and 9% of those in the placebo group). CONCLUSIONS: Lanreotide was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival among patients with metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors of grade 1 or 2 (Ki-67 <10%). (Funded by Ipsen; CLARINET ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00353496; EudraCT 2005-004904-35.).

11 Clinical Trial Feasibility and yield of a novel 22-gauge histology EUS needle in patients with pancreatic masses: a multicenter prospective cohort study. 2013

Larghi, Alberto / Iglesias-Garcia, Julio / Poley, Jan-Werner / Monges, Geneviève / Petrone, Maria Chiara / Rindi, Guido / Abdulkader, Ihab / Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio / Costamagna, Guido / Biermann, Katharina / Bories, Erwan / Doglioni, Claudio / Dominguez-Muñoz, J Enrique / Hassan, Cesare / Bruno, Marco / Giovannini, Marc. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Catholic University, Largo A. Gemelli 8, 00168, Rome, Italy, albertolarghi@yahoo.it. ·Surg Endosc · Pubmed #23644834.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The option of obtaining tissue samples for histological examination during endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has theoretical and practical advantages over cytology alone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, yield, and diagnostic accuracy of a new EUS 22-G fine-needle biopsy (FNB) device in patients with solid pancreatic masses in a multicenter, prospective study. METHODS: All consecutive patients who underwent EUS-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) using a newly developed 22-G FNB needle between September 2010 and October 2010 were enrolled in the study. The EUS-FNB technique was standardized among the participating endoscopists. Only a single needle pass was performed. RESULTS: A total of 61 patients (35 males, mean age 64.2 ± 12.4 years) with solid pancreatic masses with a mean size of 32.4 ± 8.5 mm (range 13-90 mm) participated. EUS-FNB was performed through the duodenum in 35 cases (57.4 %) and was technically feasible in all but one of the 61 (98.4 %) patients without complications. Tissue samples for histological examination were obtained from 55 patients (90.2 %) and were deemed adequate in 54 of the cases (88.5 %). The diagnoses established by EUS-FNB were adenocarcinoma (39 patients), neuroendocrine tumors (5), chronic focal pancreatitis (5), sarcoma (2), lymphoma (1), acinar cellular tumor (1), and pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (1). In an intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy for the histologic diagnosis of a pancreatic mass were 87.5, 100, 100, 41.7, and 88.5 %, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: EUS-FNB was technically feasible in 98 % of patients with a solid pancreatic mass. A suitable sample for histological evaluation was obtained in 88.5 % of the cases after only one single needle pass. The apparently low negative predictive value is likely to be improved by increasing the number of needle passes.

12 Clinical Trial Ki-67 grading of nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors on histologic samples obtained by EUS-guided fine-needle tissue acquisition: a prospective study. 2012

Larghi, Alberto / Capurso, Gabriele / Carnuccio, Antonella / Ricci, Riccardo / Alfieri, Sergio / Galasso, Domenico / Lugli, Francesca / Bianchi, Antonio / Panzuto, Francesco / De Marinis, Laura / Falconi, Massimo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Doglietto, Giovanni Battista / Costamagna, Guido / Rindi, Guido. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Divisionof Digestive and Liver Disease, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. albertolarghi@yahoo.it ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #22898415.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Preoperative determination of Ki-67 expression, an important prognostic factor for grading nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine tumors (NF-PETs), remains an important clinical challenge. OBJECTIVE: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility, yield, and clinical impact of EUS-guided fine-needle tissue acquisition (EUS-FNTA) with a large-gauge needle to obtain tissue samples for histologic diagnosis and Ki-67 analysis in patients with suspected NF-PETs. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Tertiary-care academic medical center. PATIENTS: Consecutive patients with a single pancreatic lesion suspicious for NF-PET on imaging. INTERVENTION: EUS-FNTA with a 19-gauge needle. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Feasibility and yield of EUS-FNTA for diagnosis and Ki-67 expression determination. RESULTS: Thirty patients (mean [± SD] age 55.7 ± 14.9 years), with a mean (± SD) lesion size of 16.9 ± 6.1 mm were enrolled. EUS-FNTA was successfully performed without complications in all patients, with a mean (± SD) of 2.7 ± 0.5 passes per patient. Adequate samples for histologic examination were obtained in 28 of the 30 patients (93.3%). Ki-67 determination could be performed in 26 of these 28 patients (92.9%, 86.6% overall), 12 of whom underwent surgical resection. Preoperative and postoperative Ki-67 proliferation indexes were concordant in 10 patients (83.3%), whereas 2 patients were upstaged from G1 to G2 or downstaged from G2 to G1, respectively. LIMITATIONS: Single center study with a single operator. CONCLUSION: In patients with suspected nonfunctioning low-grade to intermediate-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs), retrieval of tissue specimens with EUS-FNTA by using a 19-gauge needle is safe, feasible, and highly accurate for both diagnosis and Ki-67 determination. A Ki-67 proliferative index acquired through this technique might be of great help for further therapeutic decisions.

13 Clinical Trial Clinicopathological features of pancreatic endocrine tumors: a prospective multicenter study in Italy of 297 sporadic cases. 2010

Zerbi, Alessandro / Falconi, Massimo / Rindi, Guido / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Tomassetti, Paola / Pasquali, Claudio / Capitanio, Vanessa / Boninsegna, Letizia / Di Carlo, Valerio / Anonymous6020648. ·Department of Surgery, Pancreas Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. zerbi.alessandro@hsr.it ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #20087335.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Information on pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) comes mostly from small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies conducted on highly selected patients. The aim of the study was to describe the clinical and pathological features of PETs in a prospective, multicenter study. METHODS: Newly diagnosed, histologically proven, sporadic PETs observed from June 2004 to March 2007 in 24 Italian centers were included in a specific data set. RESULTS: Two hundred ninety-seven patients (mean age 58.6+/-14.7 years, females 51.2%, males 48.8%) were analyzed. In 73 cases (24.6%), the tumor was functioning (F) (53 insulinomas, 15 gastrinomas, 5 other syndromes) and in 232 (75.4%) it was non-functioning (NF); in 115 cases (38.7%), the diagnosis was incidental. The median tumor size was 20 mm (range 2-150). NF-PETs were significantly more represented among carcinomas (P<0.001). Nodal and liver metastases were detected in 84 (28.3%) and 85 (28.6%) cases, respectively. The presence of liver metastases was significantly higher in the NF-PETs than in the F-PETs (32.1% vs. 17.8%; P<0.05), and in the symptomatic than in the asymptomatic patients (34.6% vs. 19.1%; P<0.005). At the time of recruitment, the majority of patients (251, 84.5%) had undergone surgery, with complete resection in 209 cases (83.3%). CONCLUSIONS: This study points out the high number of new cases of PETs observed in Italy, with a high prevalence of NF and incidentally discovered forms. The size of the tumor was smaller and the rate of metastasis was lower than usually reported, suggesting a trend toward an earlier diagnosis.

14 Article A multicenter randomized trial comparing a 25-gauge EUS fine-needle aspiration device with a 20-gauge EUS fine-needle biopsy device. 2019

van Riet, Priscilla A / Larghi, Alberto / Attili, Fabia / Rindi, Guido / Nguyen, Nam Quoc / Ruszkiewicz, Andrew / Kitano, Masayuki / Chikugo, Takaaki / Aslanian, Harry / Farrell, James / Robert, Marie / Adeniran, Adebowale / Van Der Merwe, Schalk / Roskams, Tania / Chang, Kenneth / Lin, Fritz / Lee, John G / Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio / Petrone, Mariachiara / Doglioni, Claudio / Iglesias-Garcia, Julio / Abdulkader, Ihab / Giovannini, Marc / Bories, Erwan / Poizat, Flora / Santo, Erwin / Scapa, Erez / Marmor, Silvia / Bucobo, Juan Carlos / Buscaglia, Jonathan M / Heimann, Alan / Wu, Maoxin / Baldaque-Silva, Francisco / Moro, Carlos Fernández / Erler, Nicole S / Biermann, Katharina / Poley, Jan-Werner / Cahen, Djuna L / Bruno, Marco J. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Endoscopy, Catholic University Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Catholic University Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Endoscopy, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. · Department of Pathology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. · Department of Endoscopy, Kinki University, Osaka-Sayama, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Kinki University, Osaka-Sayama, Japan. · Department of Endoscopy, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Department of Endoscopy, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Pathology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Endoscopy, University of California, Irvine, California, USA. · Department of Pathology, University of California, Irvine, California, USA. · Department of Endoscopy, Vita Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Vita Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Endoscopy, University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Department of Pathology, University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Department of Endoscopy, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseilles, France. · Department of Pathology, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseilles, France. · Department of Endoscopy, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Pathology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Endoscopy, Stony Brook University Hospital, Stony Brook, New York, USA. · Department of Pathology, Stony Brook University Hospital, Stony Brook, New York, USA. · Department of Upper GI Diseases, Unit of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Pathology/Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #30367877.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Several studies have compared EUS-guided FNA with fine-needle biopsy (FNB), but none have proven superiority. We performed a multicenter randomized controlled trial to compare the performance of a commonly used 25-gauge FNA needle with a newly designed 20-gauge FNB needle. METHODS: Consecutive patients with a solid lesion were randomized in this international multicenter study between a 25-gauge FNA (EchoTip Ultra) or a 20-gauge FNB needle (ProCore). The primary endpoint was diagnostic accuracy for malignancy and the Bethesda classification (non-diagnostic, benign, atypical, malignant). Technical success, safety, and sample quality were also assessed. Multivariable and supplementary analyses were performed to adjust for confounders. RESULTS: A total of 608 patients were allocated to FNA (n = 306) or FNB (n = 302); 312 pancreatic lesions (51%), 147 lymph nodes (24%), and 149 other lesions (25%). Technical success rate was 100% for the 25-gauge FNA and 99% for the 20-gauge FNB needle (P = .043), with no differences in adverse events. The 20-gauge FNB needle outperformed 25-gauge FNA in terms of histologic yield (77% vs 44%, P < .001), accuracy for malignancy (87% vs 78%, P = .002) and Bethesda classification (82% vs 72%, P = .002). This was robust when corrected for indication, lesion size, number of passes, and presence of an on-site pathologist (odds ratio, 3.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.55-8.56; P = .004), and did not differ among centers (P = .836). CONCLUSION: The 20-gauge FNB needle outperformed the 25-gauge FNA needle in terms of histologic yield and diagnostic accuracy. This benefit was irrespective of the indication and was consistent among participating centers, supporting the general applicability of our findings. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT02167074.).

15 Article Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1 disease: a mono-centric longitudinal and prognostic study. 2018

Chiloiro, S / Lanza, F / Bianchi, A / Schinzari, G / Brizi, M G / Giampietro, A / Rufini, V / Inzani, F / Giordano, A / Rindi, G / Pontecorvi, A / De Marinis, L. ·Department of Endocrinology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · Department of Radiology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · Department of Anatomic Pathology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · Department of Endocrinology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. laurademarinis@yahoo.it. ·Endocrine · Pubmed #28567607.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an inherited endocrine neoplastic syndrome associated with a greater risk of endocrine tumor development like pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NET), with different clinical characteristics from sporadic ones. This paper aims to compare clinical, hystological and morphological aspects of p-NET in patients affected from MEN1 (MEN1+) and not-affected ones (MEN1-). METHODS: We performed a retrospective observational study. Data was collected between December 2010 and December 2015, including patients with a histological diagnosis of p-NET and radiological imaging. We compared clinical, histological, radiological, and prognostic aspects of MEN+ p-NET with MEN-1 p-NET. RESULTS: Of the 45 patients enrolled, 13 MEN1+ and 21 MEN1- cases were analyzed. Frequency of not secreting p-NETs and insulin secreting p-NETs, histopathological grades and Ki67 expression were superimposable between MEN1+ and MEN1- patients. MEN1+ pNETs are more often multicentric compared to MEN1- pNETs. Frequency of liver and nodes metastatic spread was higher in MEN1- p-NET compared to MEN1+ p-NET. Analyzing p-NET according to the disease outcome, we found that recovered and stable p-NETs in MEN1+ patients, compared to MEN1- cases, are diagnosed at lower age (p = 0.04/p = 0.002) and that are more frequently multifocal lesions (p = 0.009/p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: In our study pNETs in MEN1+ and pNETs in MEN1- don't significantly differ for prognosis but only for clinical features. p-NET stage disease and prognosis can be positively influenced by early diagnosis and screening in index patients' first-degree relatives.

16 Article RUNX3 as a Potential Predictor of Metastasis in Human Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Rossi, Ernesto / Bagalà, Cinzia / Inzani, Frediano / Leoncini, Emanuele / Brunelli, Chiara / Lanza, Paola / Basso, Michele / Mattiucci, Gian Carlo / Cassano, Alessandra / Rindi, Guido / Barone, Carlo / Schinzari, Giovanni. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione Policlinico "A.Gemelli", Largo A. Gemelli, Rome, Italy ernestorossi.rm@gmail.com. · Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione Policlinico "A.Gemelli", Largo A. Gemelli, Rome, Italy. · Institute of Anatomic Pathology, Fondazione Policlinico "A.Gemelli", Largo A. Gemelli, Rome, Italy. · Section of Hygiene, Institute of Public Health, Fondazione Policlinico "A.Gemelli", Largo A. Gemelli, Rome, Italy. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione Policlinico "A.Gemelli", Largo A. Gemelli, Rome, Italy. ·In Vivo · Pubmed #28882948.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/AIM: In genetically engineered murine models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC), high levels of Runx3 increase the metastatic potential of cancer cells. In this study we evaluated the role of Runx3 in human pancreatic cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Runx3 was retrospectively assessed by immunohistochemistry in seventy-eight tumor samples of patients who underwent surgical resection for PDCA and were followed at least for 24 months. RESULTS: Thirty-two cases resulted completely negative for Runx3; forty-six showed highly variable expression. We established an optimal cut-off value of Runx3 in predicting distant metastasis equal to 0.04. The odds ratio (ORs) for development of distant metastases at multivariate analysis for patients having Runx3 ≥0.04 was 4.26 (p=0.043) and 4.68 (p=0.032) after adjusting for residual tumor and treatment, respectively; OR for development of metastases in multiple sites was 4.28 (p=0.025) for Runx3 ≥0.04. CONCLUSION: Our results support the ability of Runx3 to contribute to the dissemination of human PDAC thus confirming the observations from murine models.

17 Article Watery stools and metabolic acidosis. 2017

Ferrari, Maria Chiara / Miele, Luca / Guidi, Luisa / Rindi, Guido / Rocchi, Carlo / Castaldi, Paola / Alfieri, Sergio / Gasbarrini, Antonio / Grieco, Antonio / Rapaccini, Gianlodovico. ·Institute of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology Area, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, Largo Gemelli, 00168, Rome, Italy. · Institute of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology Area, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, Largo Gemelli, 00168, Rome, Italy. luca.miele@policlinicogemelli.it. · Institute of Human Pathology and Oncology Area, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome, Italy. · Institute of Emergency Medicine and Anaesthesiology Area, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome, Italy. · PET-CT Center, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome, Italy. · Institute of Surgery and Abdominal Surgery Area, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome, Italy. ·Intern Emerg Med · Pubmed #28382558.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Article The Accessory Spleen Is an Important Pitfall of 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT in the Workup for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasm. 2017

Rufini, Vittoria / Inzani, Frediano / Stefanelli, Antonella / Castaldi, Paola / Perotti, Germano / Cinquino, Annarita / Indovina, Luca / Rindi, Guido. ·From the *Institute of Nuclear Medicine, †Roma ENETS Center of Excellence for the Diagnosis and Cure of Neuroendocrine Tumors, ‡Institute of Pathology, and §Division of Medical Physics, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore-Fondazione Policlinico A. Gemelli, Rome, Italy. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #27846139.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess the value and potential pitfalls of Ga-DOTANOC positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with suspected pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNEN). METHODS: Consecutive patients referred for Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT for suspected pNEN between May 1, 2011, and October 31, 2014, were retrospectively assessed. Scan data were compared with cytological/histological final diagnosis. Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm detection rate was determined on per-patient and per-lesion basis. Maximum standardized uptake values of lesions were determined. RESULTS: Fifty-eight patients with 65 lesions were enrolled. Twelve patients had nonconfirmed diagnosis; of these, 7 were positive and 5 negative at PET/CT. Of 46 patients with confirmed diagnosis, 36 had pNEN; of these, 33 were positive, 1 negative, and 2 nonevaluable at PET/CT. Ten patients had non-NE lesions, of which 8 were positive, 1 negative, and 1 nonevaluable at PET/CT. Of 48 patients with positive PET/CT, 8 proved to have non-NE lesions, of which 6 were intrapancreatic accessory spleen. No significant maximum standardized uptake values difference was found between pNEN and non-NE lesions. CONCLUSIONS: Intrapancreatic accessory spleen is an important pitfall in Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT for suspected pNEN. Cytological/histological confirmation is mandatory before any surgical procedure is undertaken.

19 Article Evaluation of the Added Value of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging to Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors and Comparison With 68Ga-DOTANOC Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography. 2016

Farchione, Alessandra / Rufini, Vittoria / Brizi, Maria Gabriella / Iacovazzo, Donato / Larghi, Alberto / Massara, Roberto Maria / Petrone, Gianluigi / Poscia, Andrea / Treglia, Giorgio / De Marinis, Laura / Giordano, Alessandro / Rindi, Guido / Bonomo, Lorenzo. ·From the Institutes of *Radiology and †Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiological Sciences; ‡Division of Endocrinology; §Digestive Endoscopy Unit; ∥Institute of Pathology; and ¶Institute of Hygiene, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; and #Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT Center, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #26418904.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to investigate the added value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) evaluation and to compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to Ga-DOTANOC positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) results. METHODS: Morphological MRI (T2-weighted [T2-w] + contrast-enhanced [CE] T1-w) and DWI (T2-w + DWI) and Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT in 25 patients/30 pNETs were retrospectively evaluated. Per-patient and per-lesion detection rates (pDR and lDR, respectively) were calculated. Apparent diffusion coefficient values were compared among pNET and surrounding and normal pancreas (control group, 18 patients). Apparent diffusion coefficient and standardized uptake value (SUV) values were compared among different grading and staging groups. RESULTS: No statistically significant differences in PET/CT and MRI session detection rates were found (morphological MRI and DW-MRI, 88% pDR and 87% lDR; combined evaluation, 92% pDR and 90% lDR; Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT, 88% pDR and 80% lDR). Consensus reading (morphological/DW-MRI + PET/CT) improved pDR and lDR (100%). Apparent diffusion coefficient mean value was significantly lower compared with surrounding and normal parenchyma (P < 0.01). The apparent diffusion coefficient and SUV values of pNETs among different grading and staging groups were not statistically different. CONCLUSIONS: Conventional MRI, DW-MRI + T2-w sequences, and Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT can be alternative tools in pNET detection. Diffusion-weighted MRI could be valuable in patients with clinical suspicion but negative conventional imaging findings. However, the consensus reading of the 3 techniques seems the best approach.

20 Article Accuracy and inter-observer agreement of the Procore™ 25 gauge needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided tissue core biopsy. 2015

Attili, Fabia / Petrone, Gianluigi / Abdulkader, Ihab / Correale, Loredana / Inzani, Frediano / Iglesias-Garcia, Julio / Hassan, Cesare / Andrade Zurita, Santiago / Rindi, Guido / Dominguez-Muñoz, J Enrique / Costamagna, Guido / Larghi, Alberto. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Gastroenterology Department, Foundation for Research in Digestive Diseases (FIENAD), University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: alberto.larghi@yahoo.it. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #26216067.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Scanty data on the performance of the new 25-gauge Procore™ biopsy needle are available. METHODS: Consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) using the 25G Procore™ were retrospectively retrieved. All samples were independently reviewed by 3 pathologists for the following: histological, cytological or no specimen, neoplasia, diagnostic or non-diagnostic. Diagnostic accuracy and inter-rater concordance among pathologists were calculated. RESULTS: 94 patients underwent EUS-FNB of 101 sites (69 solid masses, 25 lymph nodes, 5 wall thickening). Forty-one biopsies (40.5%) were classified as histological samples by at least two pathologists, 29 as cytological (28.7%), 31 had no sample (30.7%). Good and almost perfect agreements among pathologists in defining cytological vs. histological samples (k 0.82; 95% CI: 0.74-0.90), diagnostic vs. non-diagnostic (k 0.95; 95% CI: 0.85-1.00) and neoplastic vs. non-neoplastic (k 0.94; 95% CI: 0.83-1.00). According to consensus rating, 61 cases were diagnostic samples (60.4%). Histological samples were more likely to lead to a correct diagnosis (OR, 4.1; 95% P=0.027), while neoplastic lesions were less likely to be correctly classified than benign (OR, 0.11; P=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: EUS-FNB with the Procore™ 25G needle provided samples for histological examination in only 40% of the cases, with 31% of inadequate specimens, despite excellent results in term of inter-observer variability.

21 Article Interobserver agreement and accuracy of preoperative endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsy for histological grading of pancreatic cancer. 2015

Larghi, Alberto / Correale, Loredana / Ricci, Riccardo / Abdulkader, Ihab / Monges, Geneviève / Iglesias-Garcia, Julio / Giovannini, Marc / Attili, Fabia / Vitale, Giovanna / Hassan, Cesare / Costamagna, Guido / Rindi, Guido. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Department of Pathology, Paoli-Calmettes Institute, Marseilles, France. · Gastroenterology Department, Foundation for Research in Digestive Diseases (FIENAD), University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Endoscopic Unit, Paoli-Calmettes Institute, Marseilles, France. ·Endoscopy · Pubmed #25521572.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIM: Poorly differentiated/high grade pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is associated with an early unfavorable outcome, and patients with these tumors may be candidates for neo-adjuvant treatment. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) may, in theory, allow preoperative assessment of PDAC histological grading. The aim of the current study was to assess the interobserver agreement and accuracy of preoperative PDAC grading from EUS-FNB specimens. METHODS: Data from 42 postsurgical PDAC patients who had undergone preoperative EUS-FNB were retrieved. Four experienced pathologists independently reviewed the EUS-FNB slides and reported tumor grading (well, moderately, or poorly differentiated). Agreement among pathologists for grading of preoperative EUS-FNB samples was expressed by using Cohen's or Fleiss' kappa statistic, as appropriate. Postsurgical PDAC grading was used as the gold standard to assess the cumulative accuracy of EUS-FNB for the preoperative prediction of PDAC grading. RESULTS: The kappa values for PDAC grading on EUS-FNB specimens ranged from 0.09 to 0.41. The total agreement among the four pathologists was only fair (κ = 0.27; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.14 - 0.38). When tumor grades were grouped as well or moderately differentiated vs. poorly differentiated, kappa values ranged from 0.19 to 0.50, with only a fair overall agreement (κ = 0.27; 95 %CI 0.21 - 0.49). The accuracy of preoperative grading from EUS-FNB was 56 % (75/134 readings; 95 %CI 40 % - 65 %), with mean sensitivity and specificity to detect a high grade, poorly differentiated tumor of 41 % (95 %CI 19 % - 54 %) and 78 % (53/68 readings; 95 %CI 60 % - 99 %), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative EUS-FNB-based histological grading of PDAC is unreliable, and current results do not support the use of this information in clinical practice. This appears to be due to suboptimal interobserver agreement among pathologists and an overall low accuracy in predicting postsurgical grading.

22 Article Italian Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AME) position statement: a stepwise clinical approach to the diagnosis of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2014

Grimaldi, Franco / Fazio, Nicola / Attanasio, Roberto / Frasoldati, Andrea / Papini, Enrico / Angelini, Francesco / Baldelli, Roberto / Berretti, Debora / Bianchetti, Sara / Bizzarri, Giancarlo / Caputo, Marco / Castello, Roberto / Cremonini, Nadia / Crescenzi, Anna / Davì, Maria Vittoria / D'Elia, Angela Valentina / Faggiano, Antongiulio / Pizzolitto, Stefano / Versari, Annibale / Zini, Michele / Rindi, Guido / Oberg, Kjell. ·Endocrinology and Metabolic Disease Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria "S. Maria della Misericordia", P.le S.M. della Misericordia, 15-33100, Udine, Italy, franco.grimaldi@aliceposta.it. ·J Endocrinol Invest · Pubmed #25038902.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Article A rare case of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome caused by a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas detected by 68Ga-DOTANOC and 18F-FDG PET/CT. 2013

Treglia, Giorgio / Salomone, Enrica / Petrone, Gianluigi / Giaccari, Andrea / Rindi, Guido / Rufini, Vittoria. ·Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. giorgiomednuc@libero.it ·Clin Nucl Med · Pubmed #23486330.

ABSTRACT: We report a rare case of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome caused by a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas detected by PET/CT using different tracers. A 43-year-old female patient with Cushing syndrome (CS) by suspected ectopic ACTH secretion underwent a 68Ga-DOTANOC and a 18F-FDG PET/CT. Both these functional imaging techniques revealed increased tracer uptake in a pancreatic mass and multiple liver metastases. Histology showed the presence of a mildly differentiated pancreatic NET. 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT may be a useful functional imaging method, complementary to 18F-FDG PET/CT, in detecting ACTH-secreting pancreatic NETs.

24 Article Treatment of malignant pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: middle-term (2-year) outcomes of a prospective observational multicentre study. 2013

Zerbi, Alessandro / Capitanio, Vanessa / Boninsegna, Letizia / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Pasquali, Claudio / Rindi, Guido / Campana, Davide / Falconi, Massimo / Anonymous1740752. ·Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #23472667.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Information on malignant pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs) is mostly from retrospective studies in highly selected patients. The aim of this prospective, multicentre study was to assess treatment and outcomes of malignant pNENs in clinical practice. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Consecutive patients with newly diagnosed, histologically-proven pNENs were included and followed-up for 2 years. Tumours were defined as malignant when nodal or distant metastases were present or invasion of extrapancreatic structures/organs was evident. RESULTS: A total of 140 patients with malignant pNENs were included. Ninety-eight patients (70.0%) underwent a surgical resection (76 radical and 22 palliative). Other non-surgical treatments were used in 101 patients (72.1%): somatostatin analogues (n = 63), chemotherapy (n = 30), ablative treatments (n = 15) and peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (n = 14). No relationship was observed between the 2010 WHO classification and type of treatment. A surgical resection was more often performed in incidentally detected tumours located in the pancreas body tail. Two-year progression-free survival was 63.8%: 82% after a radical resection, 44% after a palliative resection and 41% without a resection. A radical resection and Ki67 proliferative index >5% and >10% were the only significant prognostic determinants in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: A radical resection is the cornerstone treatment of malignant pNENs and represents, together with Ki67 assessment, the most powerful prognostic factor for 2-year outcomes.

25 Article A case of insulinoma detected by (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and missed by (18)F-dihydroxyphenylalanine PET/CT. 2013

Treglia, Giorgio / Inzani, Frediano / Campanini, Nicoletta / Rindi, Guido / Agnes, Salvatore / Giordano, Alessandro / Rufini, Vittoria. ·Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. giorgiomednuc@libero.it ·Clin Nucl Med · Pubmed #23377414.

ABSTRACT: A 65-year-old woman with suspected insulinoma on the basis of clinical, biochemical, and conventional imaging data underwent F-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) PET/CT and Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT. F-DOPA PET/CT did not show any focal uptake in the pancreas, whereas Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT showed a focal area of intense uptake in the pancreatic tail. The patient underwent surgery and an insulinoma of about 20 mm in diameter was detected in the pancreatic tail. F-DOPA PET may fail in localizing insulin secreting tumors in adults; in these cases, the use of Ga-somatostatin analogs may lead to the correct diagnosis.

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