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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Sabina Rinaldi
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, S. Rinaldi wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article KRAS mutations in blood circulating cell-free DNA: a pancreatic cancer case-control. 2016

Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence / Foll, Matthieu / Wozniak, Magdalena B / Delhomme, Tiffany M / Durand, Geoffroy / Chopard, Priscilia / Pertesi, Maroulio / Fabianova, Eleonora / Adamcakova, Zora / Holcatova, Ivana / Foretova, Lenka / Janout, Vladimir / Vallee, Maxime P / Rinaldi, Sabina / Brennan, Paul / McKay, James D / Byrnes, Graham B / Scelo, Ghislaine. ·International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Regional Authority of Public Health, Banska Bystrica, Slovakia. · Charles University of Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Prague, Czech Republic. · Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute and Medical Faculty of Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, Czech Republic. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27705932.

ABSTRACT: The utility of KRAS mutations in plasma circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) samples as non-invasive biomarkers for the detection of pancreatic cancer has never been evaluated in a large case-control series. We applied a KRAS amplicon-based deep sequencing strategy combined with analytical pipeline specifically designed for the detection of low-abundance mutations to screen plasma samples of 437 pancreatic cancer cases, 141 chronic pancreatitis subjects, and 394 healthy controls. We detected mutations in 21.1% (N=92) of cases, of whom 82 (89.1%) carried at least one mutation at hotspot codons 12, 13 or 61, with mutant allelic fractions from 0.08% to 79%. Advanced stages were associated with an increased proportion of detection, with KRAS cfDNA mutations detected in 10.3%, 17,5% and 33.3% of cases with local, regional and systemic stages, respectively. We also detected KRAS cfDNA mutations in 3.7% (N=14) of healthy controls and in 4.3% (N=6) of subjects with chronic pancreatitis, but at significantly lower allelic fractions than in cases. Combining cfDNA KRAS mutations and CA19-9 plasma levels on a limited set of case-control samples did not improve the overall performance of the biomarkers as compared to CA19-9 alone. Whether the limited sensitivity and specificity observed in our series of KRAS mutations in plasma cfDNA as biomarkers for pancreatic cancer detection are attributable to methodological limitations or to the biology of cfDNA should be further assessed in large case-control series.

2 Article Concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2012

Rohrmann, S / Grote, V A / Becker, S / Rinaldi, S / Tjønneland, A / Roswall, N / Grønbæk, H / Overvad, K / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Clavel-Chapelon, F / Racine, A / Teucher, B / Boeing, H / Drogan, D / Dilis, V / Lagiou, P / Trichopoulou, A / Palli, D / Tagliabue, G / Tumino, R / Vineis, P / Mattiello, A / Rodríguez, L / Duell, E J / Molina-Montes, E / Dorronsoro, M / Huerta, J-M / Ardanaz, E / Jeurnink, S / Peeters, P H M / Lindkvist, B / Johansen, D / Sund, M / Ye, W / Khaw, K-T / Wareham, N J / Allen, N E / Crowe, F L / Fedirko, V / Jenab, M / Michaud, D S / Norat, T / Riboli, E / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Kaaks, R. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Hirschengraben 84, Zürich 8001, Switzerland. sabine.rohrmann@ifspm.uzh.ch ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #22315049.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (BPs) regulate cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, and may have a role in the aetiology of various cancers. Information on their role in pancreatic cancer is limited and was examined here in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. METHODS: Serum concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in 422 cases and 422 controls matched on age, sex, study centre, recruitment date, and time since last meal. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for confounding variables. RESULTS: Neither circulating levels of IGF-I (OR=1.21, 95% CI 0.75-1.93 for top vs bottom quartile, P-trend 0.301), IGFBP-3 (OR=1.00, 95% CI 0.66-1.51, P-trend 0.79), nor the molar IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio, an indicator of free IGF-I level (OR=1.22, 95% CI 0.75-1.97, P-trend 0.27), were statistically significantly associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer. In a cross-classification, however, a high concentration of IGF-I with concurrently low levels of IGFBP-3 was related to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR=1.72, 95% CI 1.05-2.83; P-interaction=0.154). CONCLUSION: On the basis of these results, circulating levels of components of the IGF axis do not appear to be the risk factors for pancreatic cancer. However, on the basis of the results of a subanalysis, it cannot be excluded that a relatively large amount of IGF-1 together with very low levels of IGFBP-3 might still be associated with an increase in pancreatic cancer risk.

3 Article The association of circulating adiponectin levels with pancreatic cancer risk: a study within the prospective EPIC cohort. 2012

Grote, Verena A / Rohrmann, Sabine / Dossus, Laure / Nieters, Alexandra / Halkjaer, Jytte / Tjønneland, Anne / Overvad, Kim / Stegger, Jakob / Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Teucher, Birgit / Becker, Susen / Montonen, Jukka / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Lagiou, Pagona / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Palli, Domenico / Sieri, Sabina / Tumino, Rosario / Vineis, Paolo / Mattiello, Amalia / Argüelles, Marcial / Duell, Eric J / Molina-Montes, Esther / Larrañaga, Nerea / Chirlaque, María-Dolores / Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte / Jeurnink, Suzanne M / Peeters, Petra Hm / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Lindkvist, Björn / Johansen, Dorthe / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Crowe, Francesca L / Romieu, Isabelle / Rinaldi, Sabina / Jenab, Mazda / Romaguera, Dora / Michaud, Dominique S / Riboli, Elio / Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H / Kaaks, Rudolf. ·German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #21681743.

ABSTRACT: Excess body weight and type 2 diabetes mellitus, risk factors of pancreatic cancer, are characterized by decreased levels of adiponectin. In addition to anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative actions, adiponectin has an important role in regulating glucose metabolism, i.e., decreasing circulating blood glucose levels. Prospectively, hyperglycemia has been associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of pre-diagnostic adiponectin levels with pancreatic cancer risk. We conducted a case-control study nested within European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Blood samples of 452 pancreatic cancer cases and 452 individually matched controls were analyzed by immunoassays. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Overall, adiponectin showed no association with pancreas cancer risk; however, among never smokers, higher circulating levels of adiponectin were associated with a reduction in pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 0.44 [95% CI 0.23-0.82] for highest vs. lowest quartile), whereas among current smokers there was no significant association (OR = 1.59 [95% CI 0.67-3.76] for highest vs. lowest quartile; p-trend = 0.530; p-interaction = 0.309). In our study, lower adiponectin concentrations may be associated with the development of pancreatic cancer among never smokers, whereas the only other prospective study being conducted so far showed a decrease in risk among male smokers. Therefore, further studies are needed to clarify the role of adiponectin in pancreatic cancer development.