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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Sara Regnér
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Sara Regner wrote the following 5 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Healthy lifestyle and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the EPIC study. 2019

Naudin, Sabine / Viallon, Vivian / Hashim, Dana / Freisling, Heinz / Jenab, Mazda / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Perrier, Flavie / McKenzie, Fiona / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Olsen, Anja / Tjønneland, Anne / Dahm, Christina C / Overvad, Kim / Mancini, Francesca R / Rebours, Vinciane / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Katzke, Verena / Kaaks, Rudolf / Bergmann, Manuela / Boeing, Heiner / Peppa, Eleni / Karakatsani, Anna / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Pala, Valeria / Masala, Giovana / Panico, Salvatore / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / May, Anne M / van Gils, Carla H / Rylander, Charlotta / Borch, Kristin Benjaminsen / Chirlaque López, María Dolores / Sánchez, Maria-Jose / Ardanaz, Eva / Quirós, José Ramón / Amiano Exezarreta, Pilar / Sund, Malin / Drake, Isabel / Regnér, Sara / Travis, Ruth C / Wareham, Nick / Aune, Dagfinn / Riboli, Elio / Gunter, Marc J / Duell, Eric J / Brennan, Paul / Ferrari, Pietro. ·Nutritional Methodology and Biostatistics Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, 150, Cours Albert Thomas, 69372, Lyon Cedex 08, France. · Department of Hematology and Oncology, Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Nutritional Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France. · Director Office, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France. · Environment and Radiation section, Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France. · Departement for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (Former), National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepathology, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. · CESP, Faculté de médecine (USVQ), Université Paris-Sud, INSERM, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France. · Inserm UMR1018, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Pancreatology Department, Beaujon Hospital, AP-HP, Clichy, France. · Inserm UMR1149, DHU Unit, Paris-Diderot University, Paris, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Pulmonary Medicine Department, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, ATTIKON University Hospital of Athens, Haidari, Greece. · School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy. · Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research, Prevention and Clinical Network - ISPRO, Florence, Italy. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medecine, University Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, Civic M.P.Arezzo Hospital, Ragusa, Italy. · Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Città della Salute e della Scienza University, Hospital and Center for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Turin, Italy. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia University, Murcia, Spain. · Spanish Consortium for Research and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria, Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain. · Department of Surgical and Preoperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Department of Nutrition, Bjørknes University College, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Endocrinology, Morbid Obesity and Preventive Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France. · Nutritional Methodology and Biostatistics Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, 150, Cours Albert Thomas, 69372, Lyon Cedex 08, France. ferrarip@iarc.fr. ·Eur J Epidemiol · Pubmed #31564045.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly fatal cancer with currently limited opportunities for early detection and effective treatment. Modifiable factors may offer pathways for primary prevention. In this study, the association between the Healthy Lifestyle Index (HLI) and PC risk was examined. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, 1113 incident PC (57% women) were diagnosed from 400,577 participants followed-up for 15 years (median). HLI scores combined smoking, alcohol intake, dietary exposure, physical activity and, in turn, overall and central adiposity using BMI (HLI

2 Article Helicobacter pylori infection, chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort: A nested case-control study. 2017

Huang, Jiaqi / Zagai, Ulrika / Hallmans, Göran / Nyrén, Olof / Engstrand, Lars / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Duell, Eric J / Overvad, Kim / Katzke, Verena A / Kaaks, Rudolf / Jenab, Mazda / Park, Jin Young / Murillo, Raul / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Lagiou, Pagona / Bamia, Christina / Bradbury, Kathryn E / Riboli, Elio / Aune, Dagfinn / Tsilidis, Konstantinos K / Capellá, Gabriel / Agudo, Antonio / Krogh, Vittorio / Palli, Domenico / Panico, Salvatore / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Tjønneland, Anne / Olsen, Anja / Martínez, Begoña / Redondo-Sanchez, Daniel / Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores / Hm Peeters, Petra / Regnér, Sara / Lindkvist, Björn / Naccarati, Alessio / Ardanaz, Eva / Larrañaga, Nerea / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Rebours, Vinciane / Barré, Amélie / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Ye, Weimin. ·Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden. · Department of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Metabolic Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Prevention and Implementation Group, Section of Early Detection and Prevention, Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece. · Translational Research Laboratory, IDIBELL-Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Research Program. Catalan Institute of Oncology-IDIBELL. L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy. · Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute - ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Dipartimento di medicina clinica e chirurgia Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Andalusian School of Public Health, Instituto De Investigación Biosanitaria Ibs, Granada, Spain. · CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs, Granada, Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Department of Health and Social Sciences, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Institution of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. · Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Human Genetics Foundation, Turin, Italy. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Regional Government of the Basque Country, Spain. · Hormones and Women's Health Team, INSERM, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Villejuif, F-94805, France. · Université Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, F-94805, France. · Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, F-94805, France. · Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, University Paris 7, Clichy, France. · Université Paris Sud and Gastroenterology Unit, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Sud, CHU de Bicêtre, AP-HP, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28032715.

ABSTRACT: The association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk remains controversial. We conducted a nested case-control study with 448 pancreatic cancer cases and their individually matched control subjects, based on the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, to determine whether there was an altered pancreatic cancer risk associated with H. pylori infection and chronic corpus atrophic gastritis. Conditional logistic regression models were applied to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for matching factors and other potential confounders. Our results showed that pancreatic cancer risk was neither associated with H. pylori seropositivity (OR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.70, 1.31) nor CagA seropositivity (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.48). We also did not find any excess risk among individuals seropositive for H. pylori but seronegative for CagA, compared with the group seronegative for both antibodies (OR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.63, 1.38). However, we found that chronic corpus atrophic gastritis was non-significantly associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 0.77, 2.37), and although based on small numbers, the excess risk was particularly marked among individuals seronegative for both H. pylori and CagA (OR = 5.66; 95% CI: 1.59, 20.19, p value for interaction < 0.01). Our findings provided evidence supporting the null association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk in western European populations. However, the suggested association between chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk warrants independent verification in future studies, and, if confirmed, further studies on the underlying mechanisms.

3 Article Artificial neural networks predict survival from pancreatic cancer after radical surgery. 2013

Ansari, Daniel / Nilsson, Johan / Andersson, Roland / Regnér, Sara / Tingstedt, Bobby / Andersson, Bodil. ·Department of Surgery, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. ·Am J Surg · Pubmed #23245432.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are nonlinear pattern recognition techniques that can be used as a tool in medical decision making. The objective of this study was to develop an ANN model for predicting survival in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS: A flexible nonlinear survival model based on ANNs was designed by using clinical and histopathological data from 84 patients who underwent resection for PDAC. RESULTS: Seven of 33 potential risk variables were selected to construct the ANN, including lymph node metastasis, differentiation, body mass index, age, resection margin status, peritumoral inflammation, and American Society of Anesthesiologists grade. Three variables (ie, lymph node metastasis, leukocyte count, and tumor location) were significant according to Cox regression analysis. Harrell's concordance index for the ANN model was .79, and for Cox regression it was .67. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, ANNs have been used to successfully predict individual long-term survival for patients after radical surgery for PDAC.

4 Article The associations of advanced glycation end products and its soluble receptor with pancreatic cancer risk: a case-control study within the prospective EPIC Cohort. 2012

Grote, Verena A / Nieters, Alexandra / Kaaks, Rudolf / Tjønneland, Anne / Roswall, Nina / Overvad, Kim / Nielsen, Michael R Skjelbo / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine / Racine, Antoine / Teucher, Birgit / Lukanova, Annekatrin / Boeing, Heiner / Drogan, Dagmar / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Lagiou, Pagona / Palli, Domenico / Sieri, Sabina / Tumino, Rosario / Vineis, Paolo / Mattiello, Amalia / Argüelles Suárez, Marcial Vicente / Duell, Eric J / Sánchez, María-José / Dorronsoro, Miren / Huerta Castaño, José María / Barricarte, Aurelio / Jeurnink, Suzanne M / Peeters, Petra H M / Sund, Malin / Ye, Weimin / Regner, Sara / Lindkvist, Björn / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Allen, Naomi E / Crowe, Francesca L / Fedirko, Veronika / Jenab, Mazda / Romaguera, Dora / Siddiq, Afshan / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Rohrmann, Sabine. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology c020, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #22301828.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptors (RAGE) have been implicated in cancer development through their proinflammatory capabilities. However, prospective data on their association with cancer of specific sites, including pancreatic cancer, are limited. METHODS: Prediagnostic blood levels of the AGE product Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and the endogenous secreted receptor for AGE (esRAGE) were measured using ELISA in 454 patients with exocrine pancreatic cancer and individually matched controls within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Pancreatic cancer risk was estimated by calculating ORs with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Elevated CML levels tended to be associated with a reduction in pancreatic cancer risk [OR = 0.57 (95% CI, 0.32-1.01) comparing highest with lowest quintile), whereas no association was observed for esRAGE (OR = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.62-1.54). Adjustments for body mass index and smoking attenuated the inverse associations of CML with pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.41-1.49). There was an inverse association between esRAGE and risk of pancreatic cancer for cases that were diagnosed within the first 2 years of follow-up [OR = 0.46 (95% CI, 0.22-0.96) for a doubling in concentration], whereas there was no association among those with a longer follow-up (OR = 1.11; 95% CI, 0.88-1.39; P(interaction) = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPACT: Our results do not provide evidence for an association of higher CML or lower esRAGE levels with risk of pancreatic cancer. The role of AGE/RAGE in pancreatic cancer would benefit from further investigations.

5 Article Pre-diagnostic levels of anionic trypsinogen, cationic trypsinogen, and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor in relation to pancreatic cancer risk. 2010

Johansen, Dorthe / Manjer, Jonas / Regner, Sara / Lindkvist, Björn. ·Department of Surgery, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. dorthe.johansen@med.lu.se ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #20484960.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/AIMS: Experimental studies have suggested that trypsinogen may enhance tumor progression and that the ratio between anionic trypsinogen and cationic trypsinogen (HAT/HCT) and between the sum of trypsinogens and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) ((HAT + HCT)/PSTI) are disturbed in patients with pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate if pre-diagnostic levels of these parameters are associated with subsequent pancreatic cancer risk. METHODS: A total of 33,346 subjects participated in a health screening programme in Malmö, Sweden. Pancreatic cancer cases (n = 84) were matched to three controls each. HAT, HCT and PSTI were analyzed in pre-diagnostic serum samples. Odds ratios for pancreatic cancer were calculated using logistic regression and were then stratified for other risk factors. RESULTS: In the main analysis, a statistically significant association between the ratio between HAT/HCT and pancreatic cancer was observed for all, for the crude OR and for the ORs adjusted for sex, BMI or Helicobacter pylori. When stratified for sex, statistically significant associations were found for females in the crude OR and for the ORs adjusted for time to analysis, BMI, alcohol consumption or H. pylori. There was a positive association between the ratio of HAT/HCT to pancreatic cancer in the intermediate/high alcohol consumption group and subjects with a BMI <25. The sum of trypsinogens showed a similar pattern, but was only of borderline significance in the intermediate/high alcohol consumption group. CONCLUSION: Our hypothesis predicted an increased risk for pancreatic cancer related to an imbalance between trypsin activity and trypsin inhibition capacity. The findings concerning the ratio of HAT/HCT are in line with this. The results related to analyses stratified for other risk factors should be considered as mainly explorative.