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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by David Propper
Based on 7 articles published since 2009
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, D. Propper wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial A phase I trial of the γ-secretase inhibitor MK-0752 in combination with gemcitabine in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2018

Cook, Natalie / Basu, Bristi / Smith, Donna-Michelle / Gopinathan, Aarthi / Evans, Jeffry / Steward, William P / Palmer, Daniel / Propper, David / Venugopal, Balaji / Hategan, Mirela / Anthoney, D Alan / Hampson, Lisa V / Nebozhyn, Michael / Tuveson, David / Farmer-Hall, Hayley / Turner, Helen / McLeod, Robert / Halford, Sarah / Jodrell, Duncan. ·Cancer Research UK, Cambridge Research Institute, University of Cambridge Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0RE, UK. · Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge CB2 0RE, UK. · Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 0YN, United Kingdom. · Department of Oncology, University of Leicester, Leicester LE2 7LX, UK. · Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Clatterbridge Road, Bebington, Wirral CH63 4JY, UK. · Bart's Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London EC1M 6BQ, London, UK. · Cancer Research UK, Centre for Drug Development, Angel Building, 407 St. John Street, London EC1V 4AD, UK. · St James Institute of Oncology, University of Leeds & Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, Leeds LS9 7TF, UK. · Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Fylde College, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YF, UK. · Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ 07033, USA. · Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #29438372.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The Notch pathway is frequently activated in cancer. Pathway inhibition by γ-secretase inhibitors has been shown to be effective in pre-clinical models of pancreatic cancer, in combination with gemcitabine. METHODS: A multi-centre, non-randomised Bayesian adaptive design study of MK-0752, administered per os weekly, in combination with gemcitabine administered intravenously on days 1, 8 and 15 (28 day cycle) at 800 or 1000 mg m RESULTS: Overall, 44 eligible patients (performance status 0 or 1 with adequate organ function) received gemcitabine and MK-0752 as first or second line treatment for pancreatic cancer. RP2Ds of MK-0752 and gemcitabine as single agents could be combined safely. The Bayesian algorithm allowed further dose escalation, but pharmacokinetic analysis showed no increase in MK-0752 AUC (area under the curve) beyond 1800 mg once weekly. Tumour response evaluation was available in 19 patients; 13 achieved stable disease and 1 patient achieved a confirmed partial response. CONCLUSIONS: Gemcitabine and a γ-secretase inhibitor (MK-0752) can be combined at their full, single-agent RP2Ds.

2 Clinical Trial Vandetanib plus gemcitabine versus placebo plus gemcitabine in locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic carcinoma (ViP): a prospective, randomised, double-blind, multicentre phase 2 trial. 2017

Middleton, Gary / Palmer, Daniel H / Greenhalf, William / Ghaneh, Paula / Jackson, Richard / Cox, Trevor / Evans, Anthony / Shaw, Victoria E / Wadsley, Jonathan / Valle, Juan W / Propper, David / Wasan, Harpreet / Falk, Stephen / Cunningham, David / Coxon, Fareeda / Ross, Paul / Madhusudan, Srinivasan / Wadd, Nick / Corrie, Pippa / Hickish, Tamas / Costello, Eithne / Campbell, Fiona / Rawcliffe, Charlotte / Neoptolemos, John P. ·University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK. · Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit and LCTU-GCPLabs, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Wirral, UK. · Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit and LCTU-GCPLabs, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK. · Division of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · Centre for Cancer and Inflammation, Barts Cancer Institute, London, UK. · Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK. · Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, University Hospital Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK. · Royal Marsden, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Northern Centre for Cancer Care, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Guy's Hospital, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK. · James Cook University Hospital, South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Middlesborough, UK. · Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. · Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Bournemouth University, Poole, UK. · Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit and LCTU-GCPLabs, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. Electronic address: j.p.neoptolemos@liverpool.ac.uk. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #28259610.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Erlotinib is an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has shown a significant but only marginally improved median overall survival when combined with gemcitabine in patients with locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer. Vandetanib is a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor of VEGFR2, RET, and EGFR, all of which are in involved in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer. We investigated the clinical efficacy of vandetanib when used in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. METHODS: The Vandetanib in Pancreatic Cancer (ViP) trial was a phase 2 double-blind, multicentre, randomised placebo-controlled trial in previously untreated adult patients (aged ≥18 years) diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic carcinoma of the pancreas confirmed by cytology or histology. Patients had to have an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score of 0-2 and a documented life expectancy of at least 3 months. Patients were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive vandetanib plus gemcitabine (vandetanib group) or placebo plus gemcitabine (placebo group) according to pre-generated sequences produced on the principle of randomly permuted blocks with variable block sizes of two and four. Patients were stratified at randomisation by disease stage and ECOG performance status. All patients received gemcitabine 1000 mg/m FINDINGS: Patients were screened and enrolled between Oct 24, 2011, and Oct 7, 2013. Of 381 patients screened, 142 eligible patients were randomly assigned to treatment (72 to the vandetanib group and 70 to the placebo group). At database lock on July 15, 2015, at a median follow-up of 24·9 months (IQR 24·3 to not attainable), 131 patients had died: 70 (97%) of 72 in the vandetanib group and 61 (87%) of 70 in the placebo group. The median overall survival was 8·83 months (95% CI 7·11-11·58) in the vandetanib group and 8·95 months (6·55-11·74) in the placebo group (hazard ratio 1·21, 80·8% CI 0·95-1·53; log rank χ INTERPRETATION: The addition of vandetanib to gemcitabine monotherapy did not improve overall survival in advanced pancreatic cancer. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors might still have potential in the treatment of pancreatic cancer but further development requires the identification of biomarkers to specifically identify responsive cancer subtypes. FUNDING: Cancer Research UK and AstraZeneca.

3 Clinical Trial Gemcitabine and capecitabine with or without telomerase peptide vaccine GV1001 in patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer (TeloVac): an open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial. 2014

Middleton, Gary / Silcocks, Paul / Cox, Trevor / Valle, Juan / Wadsley, Jonathan / Propper, David / Coxon, Fareeda / Ross, Paul / Madhusudan, Srinivasan / Roques, Tom / Cunningham, David / Falk, Stephen / Wadd, Nick / Harrison, Mark / Corrie, Pippa / Iveson, Tim / Robinson, Angus / McAdam, Karen / Eatock, Martin / Evans, Jeff / Archer, Caroline / Hickish, Tamas / Garcia-Alonso, Angel / Nicolson, Marianne / Steward, William / Anthoney, Alan / Greenhalf, William / Shaw, Victoria / Costello, Eithne / Naisbitt, Dean / Rawcliffe, Charlotte / Nanson, Gemma / Neoptolemos, John. ·University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK. · Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit and GCLP Facility, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and University of Manchester, Manchester UK. · Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK. · St Bartholomew's Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust, West Smithfield, London, UK. · Northern Centre for Cancer Care, The Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Guy's Hospital, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK. · Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Norwich, UK. · The Royal Marsden, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Bristol Haematology And Oncology Centre, University Hospital Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK. · The James Cook University Hospital, South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Middleborough, UK. · Mount Vernon Hospital, The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Northwood, UK. · Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. · Southampton General Hospital, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, Hampshire, UK. · Conquest Hospital, East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust, The Ridge, St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex, UK. · Peterborough City Hospital, Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Edith, Cavell Campus, Peterborough, UK. · Belfast City Hospital, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, UK. · University of Glasgow, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK. · Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Cosham, Portsmouth, UK. · Royal Bournemouth Hospital, The Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Bournemouth, UK. · Glan Clwyd Hospital, University Health Board, Rhyl, Denbighshire, UK. · Abderdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Aberdeen, UK. · Leicester Royal Infirmary, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK. · St James University Hospital, The Leeds Teaching Hospital Trust, Beckett Street, Leeds, UK. · Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit and GCLP Facility, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. Electronic address: j.p.neoptolemos@liverpool.ac.uk. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #24954781.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of sequential or simultaneous telomerase vaccination (GV1001) in combination with chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. METHODS: TeloVac was a three-group, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial. We recruited patients from 51 UK hospitals. Eligible patients were treatment naive, aged older than 18 years, with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-2. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive either chemotherapy alone, chemotherapy with sequential GV1001 (sequential chemoimmunotherapy), or chemotherapy with concurrent GV1001 (concurrent chemoimmunotherapy). Treatments were allocated with equal probability by means of computer-generated random permuted blocks of sizes 3 and 6 in equal proportion. Chemotherapy included six cycles of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2), 30 min intravenous infusion, at days 1, 8, and 15) and capecitabine (830 mg/m(2) orally twice daily for 21 days, repeated every 28 days). Sequential chemoimmunotherapy included two cycles of combination chemotherapy, then an intradermal lower abdominal injection of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; 75 μg) and GV1001 (0·56 mg; days 1, 3, and 5, once on weeks 2-4, and six monthly thereafter). Concurrent chemoimmunotherapy included giving GV1001 from the start of chemotherapy with GM-CSF as an adjuvant. The primary endpoint was overall survival; analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, number ISRCTN4382138. FINDINGS: The first patient was randomly assigned to treatment on March 29, 2007, and the trial was terminated on March 27, 2011. Of 1572 patients screened, 1062 were randomly assigned to treatment (358 patients were allocated to the chemotherapy group, 350 to the sequential chemoimmunotherapy group, and 354 to the concurrent chemoimmunotherapy group). We recorded 772 deaths; the 290 patients still alive were followed up for a median of 6·0 months (IQR 2·4-12·2). Median overall survival was not significantly different in the chemotherapy group than in the sequential chemoimmunotherapy group (7·9 months [95% CI 7·1-8·8] vs 6·9 months [6·4-7·6]; hazard ratio [HR] 1·19, 98·25% CI 0·97-1·48, p=0·05), or in the concurrent chemoimmunotherapy group (8·4 months [95% CI 7·3-9·7], HR 1·05, 98·25% CI 0·85-1·29, p=0·64; overall log-rank of χ(2)2df=4·3; p=0·11). The commonest grade 3-4 toxic effects were neutropenia (68 [19%] patients in the chemotherapy group, 58 [17%] patients in the sequential chemoimmunotherapy group, and 79 [22%] patients in the concurrent chemoimmunotherapy group; fatigue (27 [8%] in the chemotherapy group, 35 [10%] in the sequential chemoimmunotherapy group, and 44 [12%] in the concurrent chemoimmunotherapy group); and pain (34 [9%] patients in the chemotherapy group, 39 [11%] in the sequential chemoimmunotherapy group, and 41 [12%] in the concurrent chemoimmunotherapy group). INTERPRETATION: Adding GV1001 vaccination to chemotherapy did not improve overall survival. New strategies to enhance the immune response effect of telomerase vaccination during chemotherapy are required for clinical efficacy. FUNDING: Cancer Research UK and KAEL-GemVax.

4 Clinical Trial Phase II, randomized, biomarker identification trial (MARK) for erlotinib in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma. 2014

Propper, D / Davidenko, I / Bridgewater, J / Kupcinskas, L / Fittipaldo, A / Hillenbach, C / Klughammer, B / Ducreux, M. ·Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK d.j.propper@qmul.ac.uk. · State Medical Institution Clinical Oncology Dispensary, Krasnodar, Russia. · University College London Cancer Institute, London, UK. · Institute for Digestive Research, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Roche Products Ltd, Welwyn Garden City, UK. · F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland. · Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #24827134.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A prospective, randomized phase II study, with mandatory tumor sampling at current disease stage, aimed to identify biomarkers predictive of improved progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with pancreatic cancer treated with erlotinib. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with histologically/cytologically confirmed, unresectable, locally advanced/metastatic pancreatic cancer, who had failed on or were unsuitable for first-line chemotherapy, underwent a tumor biopsy and were then randomized to receive once-daily erlotinib 150 mg or placebo. The primary end point was identification of biomarkers predicting improved PFS with erlotinib. Secondary end points included PFS, overall survival, response and toxicity. RESULTS: At data cut-off, 207 patients were enrolled and analyzed. Prespecified biomarker analyses of EGFR protein expression, EGFR gene copy number/mutations/polymorphisms and KRAS mutations did not identify any subgroups with a detrimental effect or a strong benefit for PFS with erlotinib. In the primary analysis, the median PFS was 6.1 versus 5.9 weeks in the erlotinib and placebo arms, respectively [hazard ratio (HR) 0.83; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63-1.10; P = 0.1909]. However, observed baseline imbalances indicated worse prognosis in the erlotinib arm. After adjustment for baseline characteristics, a significant PFS benefit for erlotinib was observed (HR 0.68; 95% CI 0.50-0.91; P = 0.0102). Exploratory biomarker analyses showed patients with high baseline serum amphiregulin levels might benefit from erlotinib. CONCLUSION: This study in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer did not identify any prespecified biomarkers predictive of PFS benefit with erlotinib. Exploratory analyses suggested high amphiregulin might predict PFS benefit from erlotinib. CLINICALTRIALSGOV NUMBER: NCT00674973.

5 Clinical Trial Gemcitabine versus gemcitabine plus dalteparin thromboprophylaxis in pancreatic cancer. 2012

Maraveyas, A / Waters, J / Roy, R / Fyfe, D / Propper, D / Lofts, F / Sgouros, J / Gardiner, E / Wedgwood, K / Ettelaie, C / Bozas, G. ·Queen's Centre for Oncology and Haematology, Castle Hill Hospital, Cottingham, UK. Anthony.maraveyas@hey.nhs.uk ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #22100906.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Annualised figures show an up to 7-fold higher incidence of vascular thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) compared to other common malignancies. Concurrent VTE has been shown to confer a worse overall prognosis in APC. METHODS: One hundred and twenty three APC patients were randomised to receive either gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) or the same with weight-adjusted dalteparin (WAD) for 12 weeks. Primary end-point was the reduction of all-type VTE during the study period. NCT00462852, ISRCTN: 76464767. FINDINGS: The incidence of all-type VTE during the WAD treatment period (<100 days from randomisation) was reduced from 23% to 3.4% (p = 0.002), with a risk ratio (RR)of 0.145, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.035-0.612) and an 85% risk reduction. All-type VTE throughout the whole follow-up period was reduced from 28% to 12% (p = 0.039), RR = 0.419, 95% CI (0.187-0.935) and a 58% risk reduction. Lethal VTE <100 days was seen only in the control arm, 8.3% compared to 0% (p = 0.057), RR = 0.092, 95% CI (0.005-1.635). INTERPRETATION: Weight adjusted dalteparin used as primary prophylaxis for 12 weeks is safe and produces a highly significant reduction of all-type VTE during the prophylaxis period. The benefit is maintained after dalteparin withdrawal although decreases with time.

6 Article Switchable CAR-T cells mediate remission in metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2019

Raj, Deepak / Yang, Ming-Hsin / Rodgers, David / Hampton, Eric N / Begum, Julfa / Mustafa, Arif / Lorizio, Daniela / Garces, Irene / Propper, David / Kench, James G / Kocher, H M / Young, Travis S / Aicher, Alexandra / Heeschen, Christopher. ·Stem Cells in Cancer and Ageing, Barts Cancer Institute (BCI), Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · Biologics, California Institute for Biomedical Research, La Jolla, California, USA. · Biological Service Unit, Barts Cancer Institute, London, UK. · Cancer and Inflammation, Barts Cancer Institute, London, UK. · Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Director of the Barts Pancreatic Cancer Tissue Bank, Barts Cancer Institute (BCI), Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Gut · Pubmed #30121627.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a disease of unmet medical need. While immunotherapy with chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells has shown much promise in haematological malignancies, their efficacy for solid tumours is challenged by the lack of tumour-specific antigens required to avoid on-target, off-tumour effects. Switchable CAR-T cells whereby activity of the CAR-T cell is controlled by dosage of a tumour antigen-specific recombinant Fab-based 'switch' to afford a fully tunable response may overcome this translational barrier. DESIGN: In this present study, we have used conventional and switchable CAR-T cells to target the antigen HER2, which is upregulated on tumour cells, but also present at low levels on normal human tissue. We used patient-derived xenograft models derived from patients with stage IV PDAC that mimic the most aggressive features of PDAC, including severe liver and lung metastases. RESULTS: Switchable CAR-T cells followed by administration of the switch directed against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-induced complete remission in difficult-to-treat, patient-derived advanced pancreatic tumour models. Switchable HER2 CAR-T cells were as effective as conventional HER2 CAR-T cells in vivo testing a range of different CAR-T cell doses. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that a switchable CAR-T system is efficacious against aggressive and disseminated tumours derived from patients with advanced PDAC while affording the potential safety of a control switch.

7 Article The VAR2CSA malaria protein efficiently retrieves circulating tumor cells in an EpCAM-independent manner. 2018

Agerbæk, Mette Ø / Bang-Christensen, Sara R / Yang, Ming-Hsin / Clausen, Thomas M / Pereira, Marina A / Sharma, Shreya / Ditlev, Sisse B / Nielsen, Morten A / Choudhary, Swati / Gustavsson, Tobias / Sorensen, Poul H / Meyer, Tim / Propper, David / Shamash, Jonathan / Theander, Thor G / Aicher, Alexandra / Daugaard, Mads / Heeschen, Christopher / Salanti, Ali. ·Centre for Medical Parasitology at Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Copenhagen and Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, 2200, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Vancouver Prostate Centre, Vancouver, BC, V6H 3Z6, Canada. · Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1M9, Canada. · Stem Cells in Cancer & Ageing, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, EC1M 6BQ, United Kingdom. · Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, 11490, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Molecular Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1L3, Canada. · UCL Cancer Institute, University College London, London, WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom. · Department of Medical Oncology, Barts Health NHS, London, EC1A 7BE, United Kingdom. · Stem Cells in Cancer & Ageing, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, EC1M 6BQ, United Kingdom. c.heeschen@unsw.edu.au. · School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia. c.heeschen@unsw.edu.au. · Centre for Medical Parasitology at Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Copenhagen and Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, 2200, Copenhagen, Denmark. salanti@sund.ku.dk. ·Nat Commun · Pubmed #30115931.

ABSTRACT: Isolation of metastatic circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patients is of high value for disease monitoring and molecular characterization. Despite the development of many new CTC isolation platforms in the last decade, their isolation and detection has remained a challenge due to the lack of specific and sensitive markers. In this feasibility study, we present a method for CTC isolation based on the specific binding of the malaria rVAR2 protein to oncofetal chondroitin sulfate (ofCS). We show that rVAR2 efficiently captures CTCs from hepatic, lung, pancreatic, and prostate carcinoma patients with minimal contamination of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Expression of ofCS is present on epithelial and mesenchymal cancer cells and is equally preserved during epithelial-mesenchymal transition of cancer cells. In 25 stage I-IV prostate cancer patient samples, CTC enumeration significantly correlates with disease stage. Lastly, rVAR2 targets a larger and more diverse population of CTCs compared to anti-EpCAM strategies.