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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Maja Primic-Žakelj
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, M. Primic-Žakelj wrote the following 5 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Development and validation of a prognostic model to predict the prognosis of patients who underwent chemotherapy and resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a large international population-based cohort study. 2019

Huang, Lei / Balavarca, Yesilda / van der Geest, Lydia / Lemmens, Valery / Van Eycken, Liesbet / De Schutter, Harlinde / Johannesen, Tom B / Zadnik, Vesna / Primic-Žakelj, Maja / Mägi, Margit / Grützmann, Robert / Besselink, Marc G / Schrotz-King, Petra / Brenner, Hermann / Jansen, Lina. ·Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Medical Faculty Heidelberg, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR), Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organization (IKNL), Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Belgian Cancer Registry (BCR), Brussels, Belgium. · Registry Department, The Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN), Oslo, Norway. · Epidemiology and Cancer Registry, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Estonian Cancer Registry, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia. · Department of Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Group (DPCG), Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam University Medical Centers (UMC), Academic Medical Center (AMC), University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. l.jansen@dkfz-heidelberg.de. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. l.jansen@dkfz-heidelberg.de. ·BMC Med · Pubmed #30905320.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer (PaC) remains extremely lethal worldwide even after resection. PaC resection rates are low, making prognostic studies in resected PaC difficult. This large international population-based study aimed at exploring factors associated with survival in patients with resected TNM stage I-II PaC receiving chemotherapy and at developing and internationally validating a survival-predicting model. METHODS: Data of stage I-II PaC patients resected and receiving chemotherapy in 2003-2014 were obtained from the national cancer registries of Belgium, the Netherlands, Slovenia, and Norway, and the US Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-18 Program. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to investigate the associations of patient and tumor characteristics with overall survival, and analysis was performed in each country respectively without pooling. Prognostic factors remaining after backward selection in SEER-18 were used to build a nomogram, which was subjected to bootstrap internal validation and external validation using the European datasets. RESULTS: A total of 11,837 resected PaC patients were analyzed, with median survival time of 18-23 months and 3-year survival rates of 21-31%. In the main analysis, patient age, tumor T stage, N stage, and differentiation were associated with survival across most countries, with country-specific association patterns and strengths. However, tumor location was mostly not significantly associated with survival. Resection margin, hospital type, tumor size, positive and harvested lymph node number, lymph node ratio, and comorbidity number were associated with survival in certain countries where the information was available. A median survival time- and 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year survival probability-predictive nomogram incorporating the backward-selected variables in the main analysis was established. It fits each European national cohort similarly well. Calibration curves showed very good agreement between nomogram-prediction and actual observation. The concordance index of the nomogram (0.60) was significantly higher than that of the T and N stage-based model (0.56) for predicting survival. CONCLUSIONS: In these large international population-based cohorts, patients with resected PaC receiving chemotherapy have distinct characteristics independently associated with survival, with country-specific patterns and strengths. A robust benchmark population-based survival-predicting model is established and internationally validated. Like previous models predicting survival in resected PaC, our nomogram performs modestly.

2 Article Resection of pancreatic cancer in Europe and USA: an international large-scale study highlighting large variations. 2019

Huang, Lei / Jansen, Lina / Balavarca, Yesilda / Molina-Montes, Esther / Babaei, Masoud / van der Geest, Lydia / Lemmens, Valery / Van Eycken, Liesbet / De Schutter, Harlinde / Johannesen, Tom B / Fristrup, Claus W / Mortensen, Michael B / Primic-Žakelj, Maja / Zadnik, Vesna / Becker, Nikolaus / Hackert, Thilo / Mägi, Margit / Cassetti, Tiziana / Sassatelli, Romano / Grützmann, Robert / Merkel, Susanne / Gonçalves, Ana F / Bento, Maria J / Hegyi, Péter / Lakatos, Gábor / Szentesi, Andrea / Moreau, Michel / van de Velde, Tony / Broeks, Annegien / Sant, Milena / Minicozzi, Pamela / Mazzaferro, Vincenzo / Real, Francisco X / Carrato, Alfredo / Molero, Xavier / Besselink, Marc G / Malats, Núria / Büchler, Markus W / Schrotz-King, Petra / Brenner, Hermann. ·Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · Geneticand Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), CIBERONC, ISCIII, Madrid, Spain. · Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR), Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organization (IKNL), Utrecht, Netherlands. · Belgian Cancer Registry (BCR), Brussels, Belgium. · Registry Department, The Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN), Oslo, Norway. · Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database (DPCD), Odense, Denmark. · Danish Pancreatic Cancer Group, HPB Section, Department of Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Epidemiology and Cancer Registry, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Clinical Cancer Registry, DKFZ and NCT, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Estonian Cancer Registry, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia. · Pancreatic Cancer Registry of Reggio Emilia Province, Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy AUSL-RE, Local Health Authority-IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany. · Departments of Epidemiology, Portuguese Oncology Institute of Porto (IPOP), Porto, Portugal. · Institute for Translational Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary. · Department of Oncology, St. Istvan and St. Laszlo Hospital and Out-Patient Department, Budapest, Hungary. · Department of Surgical Oncology, Jules Bordet Institute (IJB), Brussels, Belgium. · Biometrics Department, The Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Analytical Epidemiology and Health Impact Unit, Department of Preventive and Predictive Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori (INT), Milan, Italy. · Hepato-Biliary Surgery Unit, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori (INT), and University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), CIBERONC, Madrid, Spain. · Department de Ciencies Experimentals i de la, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Oncology, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital, IRYCIS, Alcala University, CIBERONC, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Exocrine Pancreas Research Unit and Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Campus de la UAB, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBEREHD and CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Group, Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ·Gut · Pubmed #29158237.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Resection can potentially cure resectable pancreatic cancer (PaC) and significantly prolong survival in some patients. This large-scale international study aimed to investigate variations in resection for PaC in Europe and USA and determinants for its utilisation. DESIGN: Data from six European population-based cancer registries and the US Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program database during 2003-2016 were analysed. Age-standardised resection rates for overall and stage I-II PaCs were computed. Associations between resection and demographic and clinical parameters were assessed using multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS: A total of 153 698 records were analysed. In population-based registries in 2012-2014, resection rates ranged from 13.2% (Estonia) to 21.2% (Slovenia) overall and from 34.8% (Norway) to 68.7% (Denmark) for stage I-II tumours, with great international variations. During 2003-2014, resection rates only increased in USA, the Netherlands and Denmark. Resection was significantly less frequently performed with more advanced tumour stage (ORs for stage III and IV versus stage I-II tumours: 0.05-0.18 and 0.01-0.06 across countries) and increasing age (ORs for patients 70-79 and ≥80 versus those <60 years: 0.37-0.63 and 0.03-0.16 across countries). Patients with advanced-stage tumours (stage III-IV: 63.8%-81.2%) and at older ages (≥70 years: 52.6%-59.5%) receiving less frequently resection comprised the majority of diagnosed cases. Patient performance status, tumour location and size were also associated with resection application. CONCLUSION: Rates of PaC resection remain low in Europe and USA with great international variations. Further studies are warranted to explore reasons for these variations.

3 Article Stratified survival of resected and overall pancreatic cancer patients in Europe and the USA in the early twenty-first century: a large, international population-based study. 2018

Huang, Lei / Jansen, Lina / Balavarca, Yesilda / Babaei, Masoud / van der Geest, Lydia / Lemmens, Valery / Van Eycken, Liesbet / De Schutter, Harlinde / Johannesen, Tom B / Primic-Žakelj, Maja / Zadnik, Vesna / Besselink, Marc G / Schrotz-King, Petra / Brenner, Hermann. ·Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Medical Faculty Heidelberg, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, DKFZ and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · The Netherlands Cancer Registry, The Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organization (IKNL), Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Belgian Cancer Registry (BCR), Brussels, Belgium. · Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN), Oslo, Norway. · Cancer Registry of Slovenia (CRS), Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Group, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. h.brenner@dkfz-heidelberg.de. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. h.brenner@dkfz-heidelberg.de. · Division of Preventive Oncology, DKFZ and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. h.brenner@dkfz-heidelberg.de. ·BMC Med · Pubmed #30126408.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The prognosis of pancreatic cancer (PaC) strongly varies across different stages and age groups, which has unfortunately not been well recorded in the literature. This international population-based study aimed to provide tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage- and age-specific survival estimates and trends in resected and overall (resected and unresected) PaC in the early twenty-first century. METHODS: Using data from the US Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-18 Program and the national cancer registries of the Netherlands, Belgium, Norway, and Slovenia, short-term and long-term overall survival results stratified by TNM stage and age in resected and overall primary PaC, irrespective of being microscopically confirmed or not, in 2003-2014 were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The temporal survival trends over three predefined periods (2003-2005, 2006-2008, and 2009-2011) were further examined using the log-rank test. RESULTS: In total, data for 125,183 patients were analyzed. Overall, age-stratified 3-year survival was 20-34% (< 60 years), 14-25% (60-69 years), and 9-13% (≥ 70 years) in stages I-II PaC; and 2-5% (< 60 years), 1-2% (60-69 years), and < 1-1% (≥ 70 years) in stages III-IV cancer. Patients who underwent operation had higher 3-year survival in each stage and age group (stages I-II: 23-39% (< 60 years), 16-31% (60-69 years), and 17-30% (≥ 70 years); stages III-IV: 5-19% (< 70 years) and 2-14% (≥ 70 years)). Perioperative survival also decreased with advancing stage and older age (stages I-II: 98-100% (< 60 years), 97-99% (60-69 years), and 94-99% (≥ 70 years); stages III-IV: 94-99% (< 70 years) and 81-96% (≥ 70 years)). Between 2003 and 2005 and 2009-2011, for overall PaC, both short-term and long-term survival improvements were observed in all countries except Belgium; for resected disease, short-term improvements were present only in the USA and Slovenia, but long-term improvements were observed in all countries except Slovenia, with stage-specific variations. CONCLUSIONS: Our large international study provides TNM stage- and age-specific population-based survival in overall and resected PaC that will facilitate clinical counseling. While the survival expectations for patients with resected PaC are substantially higher than the widely available and known dismal survival predictions for overall patients, conclusions on the benefits of resection cannot be made from this observational study. Patients with advanced-stage disease and/or older age should undergo careful risk assessment before treatment. Limited but inspiring improvement in survival is observed.

4 Article Nonsurgical therapies for resected and unresected pancreatic cancer in Europe and USA in 2003-2014: a large international population-based study. 2018

Huang, Lei / Jansen, Lina / Balavarca, Yesilda / van der Geest, Lydia / Lemmens, Valery / Van Eycken, Liesbet / De Schutter, Harlinde / Johannesen, Tom B / Primic-Žakelj, Maja / Zadnik, Vesna / Mägi, Margit / Pulte, Dianne / Schrotz-King, Petra / Brenner, Hermann. ·Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Medical Faculty Heidelberg, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR), The Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organization (IKNL), Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Belgian Cancer Registry (BCR), Brussels, Belgium. · Registry Department, The Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN), Oslo, Norway. · Epidemiology and Cancer Registry, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Estonian Cancer Registry, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #29923613.

ABSTRACT: The role of chemotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer (PaC) has been well-established, while radiation plays ambiguous roles. This international large-scale population-based study aimed to investigate the real-world application of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for resected and unresected PaC in Europe and USA. Population-based data from multiple European national cancer registries and the US Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-18 database during 2003-2014 were analyzed. Temporal trends and geographical variations in the application rates of chemotherapy and radiotherapy were quantified using age standardization. Associations of treatment with demographic and clinical characteristics were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. A total of 141,533 PaC patients were analyzed. From 2003-2005 to 2012-2014, chemotherapy administration rates increased in most countries and more strongly among resected patients, while radiation rates were generally low with a slight decline or no obvious trend. In 2012-2014, 12.5% (Estonia) to 61.7% (Belgium) of resected and 17.1% (Slovenia) to 56.9% (Belgium) of unresected patients received chemotherapy. Radiation was administered in 2.6% (Netherlands) to 32.6% (USA) of resected and 1.0% (USA) to 6.0% (Belgium) of unresected patients. Strong temporal and geographical variations were observed. Patterns and strengths of associations of treatment administration with various demographic and clinical factors differed substantially between resected and unresected cancers and varied greatly across countries. Conclusively, administration of chemotherapy but not radiotherapy for PaC increased during the last decade in Europe and USA. Treatment rates were low and the uptake strongly varied across countries, highlighting the need for standardization in PaC treatment to improve patient care.

5 Article Common variables in European pancreatic cancer registries: The introduction of the EURECCA pancreatic cancer project. 2016

de Leede, E M / Sibinga Mulder, B G / Bastiaannet, E / Poston, G J / Sahora, K / Van Eycken, E / Valerianova, Z / Mortensen, M B / Dralle, H / Primic-Žakelj, M / Borràs, J M / Gasslander, T / Ryzhov, A / Lemmens, V E / Mieog, J S D / Boelens, P G / van de Velde, C J H / Bonsing, B A. ·Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of Surgery and Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Medical University of Vienna/ABCSG Pancreatic Cancer Registry, Austria. · Belgian Cancer Registry, Brussels, Belgium. · Bulgarian National Cancer Registry/National Oncological Hospital, Sofia, Bulgaria. · Department of Surgery, Odense University Hospital/Danish Pancreas Cancer Group, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, University of Halle-Wittenberg/Pancreatic Cancer Register, Halle, Germany. · Epidemiology and Cancer Registry/Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Linköping University/Swedish Registry for Pancreatic Tumors, Sweden. · National Cancer Registry of Ukraine/National Institute of Cancer, Kiev, Ukraine. · Department of Research, Netherlands Cancer Registry/Comprehensive Cancer Centre The Netherlands (IKNL), Eindhoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. Electronic address: c.j.h.van_de_velde@lumc.nl. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #27061790.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Quality assurance of cancer care is of utmost importance to detect and avoid under and over treatment. Most cancer data are collected by different procedures in different countries, and are poorly comparable at an international level. EURECCA, acronym for European Registration of Cancer Care, is a platform aiming to harmonize cancer data collection and improve cancer care by feedback. After the prior launch of the projects on colorectal, breast and upper GI cancer, EURECCA's newest project is collecting data on pancreatic cancer in several European countries. METHODS: National cancer registries, as well as specific pancreatic cancer audits/registries, were invited to participate in EURECCA Pancreas. Participating countries were requested to share an overview of their collected data items. Of the received datasets, a shared items list was made which creates insight in similarities between different national registries and will enable data comparison on a larger scale. Additionally, first data was requested from the participating countries. RESULTS: Over 24 countries have been approached and 11 confirmed participation: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Denmark, Germany, The Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine and United Kingdom. The number of collected data items varied between 16 and 285. This led to a shared items list of 25 variables divided into five categories: patient characteristics, preoperative diagnostics, treatment, staging and survival. Eight countries shared their first data. CONCLUSIONS: A list of 25 shared items on pancreatic cancer coming from eleven participating registries was created, providing a basis for future prospective data collection in pancreatic cancer treatment internationally.