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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Ignasi Poves
Based on 11 articles published since 2009
(Why 11 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Ignasi Poves wrote the following 11 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Reduced risk of pancreatic cancer associated with asthma and nasal allergies. 2017

Gomez-Rubio, Paulina / Zock, Jan-Paul / Rava, Marta / Marquez, Mirari / Sharp, Linda / Hidalgo, Manuel / Carrato, Alfredo / Ilzarbe, Lucas / Michalski, Christoph / Molero, Xavier / Farré, Antoni / Perea, José / Greenhalf, William / O'Rorke, Michael / Tardón, Adonina / Gress, Thomas / Barberà, Victor / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana / Domínguez-Muñoz, Enrique / Muñoz-Bellvís, Luís / Alvarez-Urturi, Cristina / Balcells, Joaquim / Barneo, Luis / Costello, Eithne / Guillén-Ponce, Carmen / Kleeff, Jörg / Kong, Bo / Lawlor, Rita / Löhr, Matthias / Mora, Josefina / Murray, Lim / O'Driscoll, Damian / Peláez, Pablo / Poves, Ignasi / Scarpa, Aldo / Real, Francisco X / Malats, Núria / Anonymous6460850. ·Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain. · National Cancer Registry Ireland, Cork, Ireland, and Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University, UK. · Hospital Madrid-Norte-Sanchinarro, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Oncology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital del Mar-Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Exocrine Pancreas Research Unit, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, 12 de Octubre University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK. · Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Laboratorio de Genética Molecular, Hospital General Universitario de Elche, Elche, Spain. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Cirugía General y del Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Gastrocentrum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. ·Gut · Pubmed #26628509.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Studies indicate an inverse association between ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (PDAC) and nasal allergies. However, controversial findings are reported for the association with asthma. Understanding PDAC risk factors will help us to implement appropriate strategies to prevent, treat and diagnose this cancer. This study assessed and characterised the association between PDAC and asthma and corroborated existing reports regarding the association between allergies and PDAC risk. DESIGN: Information about asthma and allergies was collated from 1297 PDAC cases and 1024 controls included in the PanGenEU case-control study. Associations between PDAC and atopic diseases were studied using multilevel logistic regression analysis. Meta-analyses of association studies on these diseases and PDAC risk were performed applying random-effects model. RESULTS: Asthma was associated with lower risk of PDAC (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.88), particularly long-standing asthma (>=17 years, OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.65). Meta-analysis of 10 case-control studies sustained our results (metaOR 0.73, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.89). Nasal allergies and related symptoms were associated with lower risk of PDAC (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.83 and OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.77, respectively). These results were supported by a meta-analysis of nasal allergy studies (metaOR 0.6, 95% CI 0.5 to 0.72). Skin allergies were not associated with PDAC risk. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a consistent inverse association between PDAC and asthma and nasal allergies, supporting the notion that atopic diseases are associated with reduced cancer risk. These results point to the involvement of immune and/or inflammatory factors that may either foster or restrain pancreas carcinogenesis warranting further research to understand the molecular mechanisms driving this association.

2 Article Pancreatic cancer and autoimmune diseases: An association sustained by computational and epidemiological case-control approaches. 2019

Gomez-Rubio, Paulina / Piñero, Janet / Molina-Montes, Esther / Gutiérrez-Sacristán, Alba / Marquez, Mirari / Rava, Marta / Michalski, Christoph W / Farré, Antoni / Molero, Xavier / Löhr, Matthias / Perea, José / Greenhalf, William / O'Rorke, Michael / Tardón, Adonina / Gress, Thomas / Barberá, Victor M / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana / Muñoz-Bellvís, Luís / Domínguez-Muñoz, Enrique / Balsells, Joaquim / Costello, Eithne / Yu, Jingru / Iglesias, Mar / Ilzarbe, Lucas / Kleeff, Jörg / Kong, Bo / Mora, Josefina / Murray, Liam / O'Driscoll, Damian / Poves, Ignasi / Lawlor, Rita T / Ye, Weimin / Hidalgo, Manuel / Scarpa, Aldo / Sharp, Linda / Carrato, Alfredo / Real, Francisco X / Furlong, Laura I / Malats, Núria / Anonymous2321201. ·Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center CNIO, Madrid, Spain. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en Oncología (CIBERONC), Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBERHD), and Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. · Research Program on Biomedical Informatics (GRIB), Hospital del Mar Research Institute (IMIM), Universidad Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital Universitaru Vall d'Hebron, Exocrine Pancreas Research Unit and Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), Barcelona, Spain. · Universitat Auntònoma de Barcelona, Campus de la UAB, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom. · Department of Medicine, Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Laboratorio de Genética Molecular, Hospital General Universitario de Elche, Elche, Spain. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, John Vane Science Centre, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom. · General and Digestive Surgery Department, Hospital Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital del Mar/Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Visceral, Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, (Saale), Germany. · Cancer Data Registrars, National Cancer Registry Ireland, Cork, Ireland. · ARC-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Sweden. · Hospital Madrid-Norte-Sanchinarro and Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · Rosenberg Clinical Cancer Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. · Department of Oncology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. · PanGenEU Study Investigators (Additional file 1: Annex S1). ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30229903.

ABSTRACT: Deciphering the underlying genetic basis behind pancreatic cancer (PC) and its associated multimorbidities will enhance our knowledge toward PC control. The study investigated the common genetic background of PC and different morbidities through a computational approach and further evaluated the less explored association between PC and autoimmune diseases (AIDs) through an epidemiological analysis. Gene-disease associations (GDAs) of 26 morbidities of interest and PC were obtained using the DisGeNET public discovery platform. The association between AIDs and PC pointed by the computational analysis was confirmed through multivariable logistic regression models in the PanGen European case-control study population of 1,705 PC cases and 1,084 controls. Fifteen morbidities shared at least one gene with PC in the DisGeNET database. Based on common genes, several AIDs were genetically associated with PC pointing to a potential link between them. An epidemiologic analysis confirmed that having any of the nine AIDs studied was significantly associated with a reduced risk of PC (Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58-0.93) which decreased in subjects having ≥2 AIDs (OR = 0.39, 95%CI 0.21-0.73). In independent analyses, polymyalgia rheumatica, and rheumatoid arthritis were significantly associated with low PC risk (OR = 0.40, 95%CI 0.19-0.89, and OR = 0.73, 95%CI 0.53-1.00, respectively). Several inflammatory-related morbidities shared a common genetic component with PC based on public databases. These molecular links could shed light into the molecular mechanisms underlying PC development and simultaneously generate novel hypotheses. In our study, we report sound findings pointing to an association between AIDs and a reduced risk of PC.

3 Article International Summit on Laparoscopic Pancreatic Resection (ISLPR) "Coimbatore Summit Statements". 2018

Palanivelu, Chinnusamy / Takaori, Kyoichi / Abu Hilal, Mohammad / Kooby, David A / Wakabayashi, Go / Agarwal, Anil / Berti, Stefano / Besselink, Marc G / Chen, Kuo Hsin / Gumbs, Andrew A / Han, Ho-Seong / Honda, Goro / Khatkov, Igor / Kim, Hong Jin / Li, Jiang Tao / Duy Long, Tran Cong / Machado, Marcel Autran / Matsushita, Akira / Menon, Krish / Min-Hua, Zheng / Nakamura, Masafumi / Nagakawa, Yuichi / Pekolj, Juan / Poves, Ignasi / Rahman, Shahidur / Rong, Liu / Sa Cunha, Antonio / Senthilnathan, Palanisamy / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Gurumurthy, S Srivatsan / Sup Yoon, Dong / Yoon, Yoo-Seok / Khatri, Vijay P. ·Division of Gastrointestinal Surgery and Minimal Access Surgery, GEM Hospital and Research Centre, Coimbatore, India. Electronic address: palanivelu@mac.com. · Division of Hapato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery and Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. · Division of HPB Surgery, Southampton General Hospital (NHS), Southampton, UK. · Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, United States. · Department of Surgery, Ageo Central General Hospital, Saitama, Japan. · Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, G B Pant Hospital, Delhi, India. · Division of Miniinvasive Surgery, S. Andrea Hospital, La Spezia, Italy. · Hepato-Pancreato- Biliary (HPB) Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taiwan. · Department of Surgical Oncology, Summit Medical Group-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Berkeley Heights, NJ, USA. · Comprehensive Cancer Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Bundang, South Korea. · Department of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center Komagome Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Surgical Oncology, Moscow Clinical Scientific Center, Moscow, Russia. · Department of HBP Surgery, Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu, South Korea. · Department of Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China. · Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center in Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam, Ho Chi Minh, Viet Nam. · Department of Surgery, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. · Department of Gastrointestinal and Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan. · Division and/or Department - Institute of Liver Studies, Department of Liver Transplantation and HPB, King's College Hospital NHS Trust, Camberwell, UK. · Department of General Surgery, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. · Department of Gastrointestinal and Pediatric Surgery, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · General Surgery Service, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Department of Surgery, Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Hepatobiliary Pancreatic and Liver Transplant Division, Bangobandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh. · The Military Institute of Hepato-Pancreatico-Biliary Surgery and Second Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China. · Department of HPB Surgery, AP-HP Hôpital Paul Brousse, Paris, France. · Division of Minimally Invasive, Liver Transplantation & HPB Surgery, GEM Hosptial & Research Centre, Coimbatore, India. · Division of Cancer Surgery / Department of Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India. · Division of HPB & Minimal Access Surgery, GEM Hosptial & Research Centre, Coimbatore, India. · Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul, South Korea. · Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, South Korea. · Department of Oncology, California Northstate University College of Medicine, Elk Grove, California, USA. ·Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29371066.

ABSTRACT: The International Summit on Laparoscopic Pancreatic Resection (ISLPR) was held in Coimbatore, India, on 7th and 8th of October 2016 and thirty international experts who regularly perform laparoscopic pancreatic resections participated in ISPLR from four continents, i.e., South and North America, Europe and Asia. Prior to ISLPR, the first conversation among the experts was made online on August 26th, 2016 and the structures of ISPLR were developed. The aims of ISPLR were; i) to identify indications and optimal case selection criteria for minimally invasive pancreatic resection (MIPR) in the setting of both benign and malignant diseases; ii) standardization of techniques to increase the safety of MIPR; iii) identification of common problems faced during MIPR and developing associated management strategies; iv) development of clinical protocols to allow early identification of complications and develop the accompanying management plan to minimize morbidity and mortality. As a process for interactive discussion, the experts were requested to complete an online questionnaire consisting of 65 questions about the various technical aspects of laparoscopic pancreatic resections. Two further web-based meetings were conducted prior to ISPLR. Through further discussion during ISPLR, we have created productive statements regarding the topics of Disease, Implementation, Patients, Techniques, and Instrumentations (DIPTI) and hereby publish them as "Coimbatore Summit Statements".

4 Article Laparoscopic Distal Pancreatectomy for Pancreatic Tumors: Does Size Matter? 2016

Fernández-Cruz, Laureano / Poves, Ignasi / Pelegrina, Amalia / Burdío, Fernando / Sánchez-Cabus, Santiago / Grande, Luis. ·Department of Surgery, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. ·Dig Surg · Pubmed #27216800.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) for large pancreatic tumors may require prolonged dissection, and this could be associated with increased operative time and intraoperative complications. METHODS: From a total cohort of 190 consecutive patients undergoing LDP, 18 patients were found to have pancreatic tumors >5 cm and were included in the retrospective study of prospectively collected data. Three techniques were used to approach the splenic vessels: the superior pancreatic, the inferior supracolic and post-pancreatic transection. RESULTS: Of these 18 patients, 13 were women and 5 were men, the median age was 68 years and their median tumor size 7 cm. Exocrine pancreatic malignancy was diagnosed in 8 patients, 6 patients had neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors and 4 patients cystic neoplasm. The median number of resected nodes was 14. R1 resections for exocrine pancreatic malignancies were found in 50% of patients. Morbidity (grade >II) was found in 16.6% of patients and 30 days mortality in 1 patient. Overall median survival was 50 months and 29 months for patients with exocrine pancreatic malignancies. CONCLUSIONS: LDP for large tumors, while technically demanding, is possible without additional morbidity and did not compromise short- and long-term oncological outcomes.

5 Article The Posterior Approach for Laparoscopic Distal Pancreatectomy: A Valid Choice for Resection of Complex Lesions of the Distal Pancreas. 2015

Poves, Ignasi / Burdío, Fernando / Grande, Luís. ·Unit of Hepato-Biliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Hospital del Mar, Autonomous University of Barcelona , Barcelona, Spain . ·J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A · Pubmed #26076336.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) is replacing open surgery as the technique of choice for benign and premalignant lesions of the left pancreas. In most laparoscopic series, the supine decubitus or semilateral position is preferred. A posterior approach with the patient in full right lateral decubitus (PA-FRLD) has been proposed as an alternative. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From July 2012 to November 2014 we performed 14 LDPs. PA-FRLD was chosen in 8 patients; in 6 patients splenectomy was also performed. RESULTS: Definitive diagnoses were 3 cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, 2 cases of nonfunctioning neuroendocrine tumors, 1 case of bulky serous cystic neoplasm, 1 case of inflammatory chronic pancreatitis, and 1 case of pancreatic trauma (duct disruption). No conversions were required. No postoperative pancreatic fistula was detected. No patient required transfusion. Two patients had Clavien II and IIIb postoperative complications. In both cases in which preservation of the splenic vessels was attempted, it was successfully achieved. CONCLUSIONS: The PA-FRLD position is a valid alternative to the supine or semilateral position for LDP. This approach is especially beneficial for resection of complex and bulky lesions of the tail of the pancreas and those in close contact with retroperitoneal organs and can also facilitate spleen-preserving LDP.

6 Article [Results of the laparoscopic approach in left-sided pancreatectomy]. 2013

Poves, Ignasi / Burdío, Fernando / Dorcaratto, Dimitri / Grande, Luis. ·Unidad de Cirugía Hepato-Bilio-Pancreática, Servicio de Cirugía General y del Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, España. ipoves@parcdesalutmar.cat ·Cir Esp · Pubmed #23218526.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic left-sided pancreatectomy (LLP) is an accepted technique for the treatment of benign and pre-malignant lesions of the left side of the pancreas, but there is still controversy on its use for malignant ones. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate our results in LLP as a routine technique for primary lesions of the left pancreas. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed LLP in 15 patients for primary lesions of the pancreas from November 2007 to November 2011. An intra-abdominal drainage was left in all cases, and the recommendations of the International Study Group for Pancreatic Fistula were followed. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 64±13 years. Six radical spleno-pancreatectomies, 3 corporo-caudal with preservation of the spleen, and 6 pure distal (4 with preservation of the spleen). There was one conversion. The mean surgical time was 230±69 minutes. The mean post-operative stay was 8.1±7.6 days. At 90 days, complications were detected in 4 patients; 3 grade II and one grade V according to the modified classification of Clavien. There was one grade B pancreatic fistula. The diagnosis was a malignant neoplasm in 53% of cases. The number of resected lymph nodes in the cases where a radical resection was planned due to cancer was 21.7±11.5, there being negative margins in all cases. CONCLUSIONS: LLP may be considered as a suitable technique for the treatment of primary pancreatic lesions, including malignant ones, provided that it is performed by groups with experience in pancreatic surgery and highly trained in laparoscopic surgery.

7 Article Retroperitoneal inflammatory pseudotumor presenting as a pancreatic mass. 2012

Poves, Ignasi / Alonso, Sandra / Jimeno, Mireya / Bessa, Xavier / Burdío, Fernando / Grande, Luís. ·Department of Surgery, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Autonomous University of Barcelona. Barcelona, Spain. ipoves@parcdesalutmar.cat ·JOP · Pubmed #22572139.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: The inflammatory pseudotumor is a rare chronic inflammatory disease not considered as a real tumor but with a similar locally aggressive behavior. Although usually located in the lungs it may be found in other organs. CASE REPORT: We present the clinical case of a 66-year-old woman diagnosed with inflammatory pseudotumor after undergoing an exploratory laparotomy due to a large non resectable abdominal mass. Preoperative abdominal CT revealed a large solid polylobulated mass involving the pancreas, duodenum, hepatic hilum and superior mesenteric artery. Percutaneous fine needle aspiration and tru-cut biopsies ruled out lymphoma but did not achieve a definitive diagnosis. CD68 antibody positivity of the surgical biopsy specimen confirmed the histiocytary origin. Ki67 antibody expression was 10%. The final diagnosis was inflammatory pseudotumor rather than malignant fibrohistiocytoma based on the features and the severity of the inflammatory component. Chemotherapy was ineffective and the patient died 25 months later because of local progression and infection of the tumoral necrotic tissue. CONCLUSION: Although inflammatory pseudotumor is not considered to be a real tumor, its aggressive local growth is similar to that of malignant soft tissue sarcomas. The only curative option is the complete surgical resection, albeit frequent recurrence.

8 Article Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy: feasibility study of radiofrequency-assisted transection in a porcine model. 2012

Dorcaratto, Dimitri / Burdío, Fernando / Fondevila, Dolors / Andaluz, Anna / Poves, Ignasi / Martinez, Maria Angeles / Quesada, Rita / Berjano, Enrique / Grande, Luis. ·General Surgery Department, Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, Spain. 97485@parcdesalutmar.cat ·J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A · Pubmed #22288880.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIM: Despite technological improvements in pancreatic surgery, the incidence and morbidity of pancreatic leak after resection of distal pancreas are persistently high in most series. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) is today the gold standard procedure for benign and certain malignant neoplasms of the pancreatic body and tail in specialized centers. This study evaluated safety and feasibility of a radiofrequency (RF)-assisted transection device in a porcine model of LDP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: LDP was performed on 10 pigs (median weight, 39.6 kg) using a new device based on an internally cooled RF-assisted electrode (Coolinside(®), Apeiron Medical, Valencia, Spain). The animals were subjected to daily observation and then sacrificed and necropsied at 4 weeks postoperatively. Primary end points were the development of postoperative pancreatic fistula using the Pancreatic Anastomotic Leak Study Group definition and/or the presence of abdominal amylase-rich fluid collections or abscesses during necropsy and pathological study and/or dye extravasation from the pancreatic remnant duct. Secondary end points were intra- or postoperative complications, surgery, and transection duration. RESULTS: No clinically relevant postoperative pancreatic fistulas were observed. In one case a grade A postoperative fistula was diagnosed due to amylase drain concentration of more than 6200 IU/mL on postoperative day 4. Median peritoneal liquid amylase concentration on postoperative day 4 was 2399.0 IU/L (range, 819.2-7122.0 IU/L), similar to the median plasma amylase level of 1520.8 IU/L (range, 1015.3-4056.6 IU/L). Median surgery time was 93.5 minutes (range, 46.0-140.0 minutes), and median transection time was 4.5 minutes (range, 2.0-26.0 minutes). There was one postoperative wound infection. There were no postoperative deaths or major complications. During the histopathological study, the surgical margin of the remaining pancreas showed a common pattern with a central area of necrosis surrounded by granulomatous infiltrate and fibrosis. Ductal obliteration was observed. No purulent inflammatory infiltrate or abscesses were present. CONCLUSION: Experimental findings suggest that performing pancreatic transection with Coolinside in a animal model of LDP is feasible and safe.

9 Article Laparoscopic pancreas-sparing subtotal duodenectomy. 2011

Poves, Ignasi / Burdio, Fernando / Alonso, Sandra / Seoane, Agustín / Grande, Luís. ·Department of General and Digestive Surgery, "Hospital del Mar", Barcelona, Spain. ipoves@parcdesalutmar.cat ·JOP · Pubmed #21206106.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Primary adenocarcinoma of the duodenum is a rare digestive malignancy which is commonly treated by radical surgical resection, pancreaticoduodenectomy being the technique of choice. Complete tumor resection obtaining free margins should be the standard of treatment for primary adenocarcinoma of the duodenum. Segmental duodenal resection is an appropriate operation for selected cases of primary adenocarcinoma of the duodenum of the 3rd and 4th portions of the duodenum. CASE REPORT: We present the case of a 67-year-old woman suffering from an infra-ampullary large villous polypoid mass affecting the 3rd portion of the duodenum. Multiple endoscopic biopsies did not disclose any malignancy, and abdominal CT and endoscopic ultrasound found no extraduodenal involvement. A 3rd and 4th portion pancreas-sparing duodenectomy was carried out using a totally laparoscopic approach. Intra-operatory duodenoscopy was done to safeguard the papilla of Vater. Recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the 7th postoperative day. The final diagnosis was primary adenocarcinoma of the duodenum (free resection margins). After forty-five months of follow-up, the patient is free of disease. CONCLUSIONS: We recommend this procedure for treatment of an infra-ampullary benign and pre-malignant duodenal pathology; it can also be a treatment option and an alternative to a pancreaticoduodenectomy in very selected cases of tumors confined to the duodenum. Expertise in both pancreatic surgery and laparoscopic techniques is required.

10 Article Resection of the uncinate process of the pancreas due to a ganglioneuroma. 2009

Poves, Ignasi / Burdío, Fernando / Iglesias, Mar / Martínez-Serrano, María de los Angeles / Aguilar, Guadalupe / Grande, Luís. ·Department of Surgery, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Passeig Marítim 25-29, 08003 Barcelona, Spain. ipoves@imas.imim.es ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #19750580.

ABSTRACT: A 33-year-old woman who presented with epigastric discomfort and diarrhea underwent an abdominal ultrasound (US). This investigation and subsequent contrast-enhanced computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic US with fine needle aspiration (FNA) revealed a 40 mm well-circumscribed mass in the uncinate process of the pancreas. Findings were suggestive of a mucinous or solid-cystic pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas, although other lesions such as a non-functioning neuroendocrine tumor could not be ruled out. FNA samples were negative for malignant cells, but of limited value due to poor cellularity. It was decided to surgically remove the tumor because malignancy could not be discounted. Multiple intraoperative biopsies were suggestive of mesenchymal tumor and consequently a conservative resection (uncinatectomy) was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful. The definitive diagnosis was ganglioneuroma. Immunocytochemistry showed positive staining with vimentin, S-100 protein, neurofilament and neuron-specific enolase. Ganglioneuroma is a rare benign tumor that can also present as a pancreatic tumor. Uncinatectomy is feasible, safe and a good surgical technique for the treatment of non-malignant tumors located in the uncinate process of the pancreas.

11 Minor [Laparoscopic radical antegrade modular pancreatosplenectomy]. 2010

Poves, Ignasi / Burdío, Fernando / Membrilla, Estela / Alonso, Sandra / Grande, Luis. · ·Cir Esp · Pubmed #19783242.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --