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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Michael N. Pollak
Based on 14 articles published since 2010
(Why 14 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Michael Pollak wrote the following 14 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Circulating Leptin and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Pooled Analysis From 3 Cohorts. 2015

Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Newton, Christina C / Silverman, Debra T / Pollak, Michael / Nogueira, Leticia M / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Albanes, Demetrius / Männistö, Satu / Jacobs, Eric J. · ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #26085045.

ABSTRACT: Adiposity is associated with pancreatic cancer; however, the underlying mechanism(s) is uncertain. Leptin is an adipokine involved in metabolic regulation, and obese individuals have higher concentrations. We conducted a pooled, nested case-control study of cohort participants from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, and the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort to investigate whether prediagnostic serum leptin was associated with pancreatic cancer. A total of 731 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases that occurred between 1986 and 2010 were included (maximum follow-up, 23 years). Incidence density-selected controls (n = 909) were matched to cases by cohort, age, sex, race, and blood draw date. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Sex-specific quintiles were based on the distribution of the controls. Overall, serum leptin was not associated with pancreatic cancer (quintile 5 vs. quintile 1: odds ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval: 0.75, 1.71; Ptrend = 0.38). There was a significant interaction by follow-up time (P = 0.003), such that elevated risk was apparent only during follow-up of more than 10 years after blood draw (quintile 5 vs. quintile 1: odds ratio = 2.55, 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 5.27; Ptrend = 0.004). Our results support an association between increasing leptin concentration and pancreatic cancer; however, long follow-up is necessary to observe the relationship. Subclinical disease may explain the lack of association during early follow-up.

2 Clinical Trial Metformin in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial. 2015

Kordes, Sil / Pollak, Michael N / Zwinderman, Aeilko H / Mathôt, Ron A / Weterman, Mariëtte J / Beeker, Aart / Punt, Cornelis J / Richel, Dick J / Wilmink, Johanna W. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. · Department of Statistics, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Hospital Pharmacy, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Internal Medicine, Spaarne Hospital, Hoofddorp, Netherlands. · Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Electronic address: j.w.wilmink@amc.uva.nl. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #26067687.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In preclinical work and retrospective population studies, the anti-diabetic drug metformin has been associated with antineoplastic activity and decreased burden of many cancers, including pancreatic cancer. There is therefore interest in the hypothesis that this drug might be repurposed for indications in oncology. We aimed to assess the efficacy of the addition of metformin to a standard systemic therapy in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, and provide the first report of a clinical trial with a survival endpoint of metformin for an oncological indication. METHODS: We did this double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial at four centres in the Netherlands. Patients aged 18 years or older with advanced pancreatic cancer were randomly assigned (1:1), via a permutated computer-generated block allocation scheme (block size of six) to receive intravenous gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2)) on days 1, 8, and 15 every 4 weeks and oral erlotinib (100mg) once daily in combination with either oral metformin or placebo twice daily. Metformin dose was escalated from 500 mg (in the first week) to 1000 mg twice daily in the second week. Randomisation was stratified by hospital, diabetes status, and tumour stage. The primary endpoint was overall survival at 6 months in the intention-to-treat population. This trial is complete and is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01210911. FINDINGS: Between May 31, 2010, and Jan 3, 2014, we randomly assigned 121 patients to receive gemcitabine and erlotinib with either placebo (n=61) or metformin (n=60). Overall survival at 6 months was 63·9% (95% CI 51·9-75·9) in the placebo group and 56·7% (44·1-69·2) in the metformin group (p=0·41). There was no difference in overall survival between groups (median 7·6 months [95% CI 6·1-9·1] vs 6·8 months [95% CI 5·1-8·5] in the metformin group; hazard ratio [HR] 1·056 [95% CI 0·72-1·55]; log-rank p=0·78). The most frequent grade 3-4 toxic effects were neutropenia (15 [25%] patients in placebo group vs 15 [25%] in metformin group), skin rash (six [10%] vs four [7%]), diarrhoea (three [5%] vs six [10%]), and fatigue (two [3%] vs six [10%]). INTERPRETATION: Addition of a conventional anti-diabetic dose of metformin does not improve outcome in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated with gemcitabine and erlotinib. Future research should include studies of more potent biguanides, and should focus on patients with hyperinsulinaemia and patients with tumours showing markers of sensitivity to energetic stress, such as loss of function of AMP kinase, a key regulator of cellular energy homoeostasis. FUNDING: Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, and The Terry Fox Foundation, Vancouver, Canada.

3 Article Prediagnosis Circulating Insulin-Like Growth Factors and Pancreatic Cancer Survival. 2017

Toriola, Adetunji T / Ziegler, Mark / Li, Yize / Pollak, Michael / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael. ·Department of Surgery, Division of Public Health Sciences, and Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. a.toriola@wustl.edu. · Department of Surgery, Division of Public Health Sciences, and Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. · Branch of Nutritional Epidemiology, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD, USA. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #28681154.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Prediagnosis obesity and diabetes are associated with survival from pancreatic cancer, but the underlying mechanisms have not been characterized. Because both are associated with dysregulation in circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF) levels, we evaluated the associations of prediagnosis IGF levels (IGF-I, IGF-II) and IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) with pancreatic cancer survival. METHODS: Participants were subjects enrolled in the intervention arm of the PLCO Cancer Screening Trial who developed exocrine pancreatic cancer during follow-up (N = 178, 116 men and 67 women). Participants provided blood samples at enrollment, before cancer diagnosis. Cox proportional hazards regression model, adjusted for confounders was used to investigate associations of IGF biomarkers with pancreatic cancer survival. Because of the well-documented, gender-specific differences in circulating IGF biomarkers, and differential associations of IGF biomarkers with mortality, we evaluated associations separately among males and females. RESULTS: Median survival was 172 days. Higher IGF-II and IGFBP-3 levels were associated with pancreatic cancer survival among males but not among females. The hazard ratios (HR) of death among men in the highest tertiles of IGF-II and IGFBP-3 compared with men in the lowest tertiles were 0.40 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.23-0.71, p < 0.01) and 0.59 (95% CI 0.35-0.97, p = 0.10), respectively. There were no statistically significant associations between IGF-I concentrations, IGF-I/IGFBP-3, and pancreatic cancer survival. CONCLUSIONS: Higher prediagnosis circulating IGF-II and IGFBP-3 levels are associated with better pancreatic cancer survival among men but not women. A greater understanding of how IGF signaling is related to pancreatic cancer survival could have utility in improving pancreatic cancer prognosis.

4 Article Serum C-peptide, Total and High Molecular Weight Adiponectin, and Pancreatic Cancer: Do Associations Differ by Smoking? 2017

Nogueira, Leticia M / Newton, Christina C / Pollak, Michael / Silverman, Debra T / Albanes, Demetrius / Männistö, Satu / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Jacobs, Eric J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Texas Cancer Registry, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Rockville, Rockville, Maryland. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta Georgia. · Department of Oncology, Lady Davis Research Institute of the Jewish General Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta Georgia. rs221z@nih.gov Eric.jacobs@cancer.org. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Rockville, Rockville, Maryland. rs221z@nih.gov Eric.jacobs@cancer.org. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #28096201.

ABSTRACT:

5 Article Pancreatic Cancer Risk Associated with Prediagnostic Plasma Levels of Leptin and Leptin Receptor Genetic Polymorphisms. 2016

Babic, Ana / Bao, Ying / Qian, Zhi Rong / Yuan, Chen / Giovannucci, Edward L / Aschard, Hugues / Kraft, Peter / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente / Ng, Kimmie / Stampfer, Meir J / Ogino, Shuji / Buring, Julie E / Sesso, Howard D / Gaziano, John Michael / Rifai, Nader / Pollak, Michael N / Anderson, Matthew L / Cochrane, Barbara B / Luo, Juhua / Manson, JoAnn E / Fuchs, Charles S / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, Maryland. · Division of MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts. · Cancer Prevention Research Unit, Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Community Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. bwolpin@partners.org. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #27780823.

ABSTRACT: Leptin is an adipokine involved in regulating energy balance, which has been identified as a potential biologic link in the development of obesity-associated cancers, such as pancreatic cancer. In this prospective, nested case-control study of 470 cases and 1,094 controls from five U.S. cohorts, we used conditional logistic regression to evaluate pancreatic cancer risk by prediagnostic plasma leptin, adjusting for race/ethnicity, diabetes, body mass index, physical activity, plasma C-peptide, adiponectin, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Because of known differences in leptin levels by gender, analyses were conducted separately for men and women. We also evaluated associations between 32 tagging SNPs in the leptin receptor (LEPR) gene and pancreatic cancer risk. Leptin levels were higher in female versus male control participants (median, 20.8 vs. 6.7 ng/mL; P < 0.0001). Among men, plasma leptin was positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk and those in the top quintile had a multivariable-adjusted OR of 3.02 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.27-7.16; P

6 Article Metformin and Rapamycin Reduce Pancreatic Cancer Growth in Obese Prediabetic Mice by Distinct MicroRNA-Regulated Mechanisms. 2015

Cifarelli, Vincenza / Lashinger, Laura M / Devlin, Kaylyn L / Dunlap, Sarah M / Huang, Jennifer / Kaaks, Rudolf / Pollak, Michael N / Hursting, Stephen D. ·Department of Medicine, Center for Human Nutrition, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. · Department of Nutritional Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX. · Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX. · Division of Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany. · Departments of Medicine and Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. · Department of Nutritional Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC hursting@email.unc.edu. ·Diabetes · Pubmed #25576058.

ABSTRACT: Metformin treatment is associated with a decreased risk and better prognosis of pancreatic cancer (PC) in patients with type 2 diabetes, but the mechanism of metformin's PC growth inhibition in the context of a prediabetic state is unknown. We used a Panc02 pancreatic tumor cell transplant model in diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6 mice to compare the effects of metformin and the direct mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin on PC growth, glucose regulation, mTOR pathway signaling, and candidate microRNA (miR) expression. In DIO/prediabetic mice, metformin and rapamycin significantly reduced pancreatic tumor growth and mTOR-related signaling. The rapamycin effects centered on decreased mTOR-regulated growth and survival signaling, including increased expression of let-7b and cell cycle-regulating miRs. Metformin (but not rapamycin) reduced glucose and insulin levels and expression of miR-34a and its direct targets Notch, Slug, and Snail. Metformin also reduced the number and size of Panc02 tumor spheres in vitro and inhibited the expression of Notch in spheroids. Our results suggest that metformin and rapamycin can both inhibit pancreatic tumor growth in obese, prediabetic mice through shared and distinct mechanisms. Metformin and direct mTOR inhibitors, alone or possibly in combination, represent promising intervention strategies for breaking the diabetes-PC link.

7 Article Elevation of circulating branched-chain amino acids is an early event in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma development. 2014

Mayers, Jared R / Wu, Chen / Clish, Clary B / Kraft, Peter / Torrence, Margaret E / Fiske, Brian P / Yuan, Chen / Bao, Ying / Townsend, Mary K / Tworoger, Shelley S / Davidson, Shawn M / Papagiannakopoulos, Thales / Yang, Annan / Dayton, Talya L / Ogino, Shuji / Stampfer, Meir J / Giovannucci, Edward L / Qian, Zhi Rong / Rubinson, Douglas A / Ma, Jing / Sesso, Howard D / Gaziano, John Michael / Cochrane, Barbara B / Liu, Simin / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Manson, JoAnn E / Pollak, Michael N / Kimmelman, Alec C / Souza, Amanda / Pierce, Kerry / Wang, Thomas J / Gerszten, Robert E / Fuchs, Charles S / Vander Heiden, Matthew G / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. · Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Division of Genomic Stability and DNA repair, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana- Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215. · Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System. · University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, WA. · Departments of Epidemiology and Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, SUNY, Buffalo, NY. · Departments of Oncology and Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN. · Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. ·Nat Med · Pubmed #25261994.

ABSTRACT: Most patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are diagnosed with advanced disease and survive less than 12 months. PDAC has been linked with obesity and glucose intolerance, but whether changes in circulating metabolites are associated with early cancer progression is unknown. To better understand metabolic derangements associated with early disease, we profiled metabolites in prediagnostic plasma from individuals with pancreatic cancer (cases) and matched controls from four prospective cohort studies. We find that elevated plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are associated with a greater than twofold increased risk of future pancreatic cancer diagnosis. This elevated risk was independent of known predisposing factors, with the strongest association observed among subjects with samples collected 2 to 5 years before diagnosis, when occult disease is probably present. We show that plasma BCAAs are also elevated in mice with early-stage pancreatic cancers driven by mutant Kras expression but not in mice with Kras-driven tumors in other tissues, and that breakdown of tissue protein accounts for the increase in plasma BCAAs that accompanies early-stage disease. Together, these findings suggest that increased whole-body protein breakdown is an early event in development of PDAC.

8 Article Serum transforming growth factor-β1 and risk of pancreatic cancer in three prospective cohort studies. 2014

Jacobs, Eric J / Newton, Christina C / Silverman, Debra T / Nogueira, Leticia M / Albanes, Demetrius / Männistö, Satu / Pollak, Michael / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, National Home Office, 250 Williams Street, Atlanta, GA, 30303-1002, USA, ejacobs@cancer.org. ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #24913781.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Clinically evident chronic pancreatitis is a strong risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A small Japanese cohort study previously reported that pre-diagnostic serum transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) concentration, a potential marker of subclinical pancreatic inflammation, was associated with higher risk of pancreatic cancer. We further explored this association in a larger prospective study. METHODS: Serum TGF-β1 concentrations were measured in pre-diagnostic samples from 729 pancreatic cancer cases and 907 matched controls from a cohort of Finnish male smokers (the Alpa-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Cancer Prevention Study) and two cohorts of US men and women, the Cancer Prevention Study-II and the Prostate Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Overall, serum TGF-β1 concentration was not associated with a clear increase in pancreatic cancer risk (OR 1.36, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.98-1.88 for highest vs. lowest quintile, p trend = 0.20). However, this association differed significantly by follow-up time (p = 0.02). Serum TGF-β1 concentration was not associated with risk during the first 10 years of follow-up, but was associated with higher risk during follow-up after 10 years (OR 2.13, 95 % CI 1.23-3.68 for highest vs. lowest quintile, p trend = 0.001). During follow-up after 10 years, serum TGF-β1 was associated with higher risk only in the ATBC cohort, although most subjects were from ATBC during this time period and statistical evidence for heterogeneity across cohorts was limited (p = 0.14). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that high serum TGF-β1 may be associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer although a long follow-up period may be needed to observe this association.

9 Article Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, impaired pancreatic β-cell function, and risk of pancreatic cancer. 2013

Wolpin, Brian M / Bao, Ying / Qian, Zhi Rong / Wu, Chen / Kraft, Peter / Ogino, Shuji / Stampfer, Meir J / Sato, Kaori / Ma, Jing / Buring, Julie E / Sesso, Howard D / Lee, I-Min / Gaziano, John Michael / McTiernan, Anne / Phillips, Lawrence S / Cochrane, Barbara B / Pollak, Michael N / Manson, JoAnn E / Giovannucci, Edward L / Fuchs, Charles S. ·Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. bwolpin@partners.org ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #23847240.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Obesity and diabetes mellitus are associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. These associations may be secondary to consequences of peripheral insulin resistance, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, or hyperglycemia itself. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a measure of hyperglycemia, whereas plasma insulin and proinsulin are markers of peripheral insulin resistance, and the proinsulin to insulin ratio marks pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. METHODS: This was a prospective, nested case-control study of 449 case patients and 982 control subjects with prediagnostic blood samples and no diabetes history from five prospective US cohorts followed through 2008. Two or three control subjects were matched to each case patient by year of birth, cohort, smoking, and fasting status. Pancreatic cancer risk was assessed by prediagnostic HbA1c, insulin, proinsulin, and proinsulin to insulin ratio with multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. All P values were two-sided. RESULTS: The highest vs lowest quintiles of HbA1c, insulin, and proinsulin were associated with with an increased risk for pancreatic cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 1.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.17 to 2.72, P trend = .04 for HbA1c; OR = 1.57; 95% CI = 1.08 to 2.30; Ptrend = .002 for insulin; and OR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.50 to 3.29; P trend < .001 for proinsulin). Proinsulin to insulin ratio was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Results were similar across studies (all P heterogeneity > .29). In cancers developing 10 or more years after blood collection, the associations with insulin and proinsulin became stronger (highest vs lowest quintile, OR = 2.77; 95% CI = 1.28 to 5.99 for insulin and OR = 3.60; 95% CI = 1.68 to 7.72 for proinsulin). In mutually adjusted models including HbA1c, insulin, and proinsulin, only proinsulin remained statistically significant ( highest vs lowest quintile, OR = 2.55; 95% CI = 1.54 to 4.21; Ptrend < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Among participants from five large prospective cohorts, circulating markers of peripheral insulin resistance, rather than hyperglycemia or pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, were independently associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

10 Article Inflammatory plasma markers and pancreatic cancer risk: a prospective study of five U.S. cohorts. 2013

Bao, Ying / Giovannucci, Edward L / Kraft, Peter / Qian, Zhi Rong / Wu, Chen / Ogino, Shuji / Gaziano, J Michael / Stampfer, Meir J / Ma, Jing / Buring, Julie E / Sesso, Howard D / Lee, I-Min / Rifai, Nader / Pollak, Michael N / Jiao, Li / Lessin, Lawrence / Cochrane, Barbara B / Manson, Joann E / Fuchs, Charles S / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ying.bao@channing.harvard.edu ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #23462920.

ABSTRACT: Chronic inflammation may play a role in the development of pancreatic cancer. However, few prospective studies have examined the association between plasma inflammatory markers and pancreatic cancer risk. Therefore, we investigated the association of prediagnostic circulating C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and TNF-α receptor II (TNF-αR2) with subsequent pancreatic cancer risk in a prospective, nested case-control study of 470 cases and 1,094 controls from Health Professionals Follow-up Study, Nurses' Health Study, Physicians' Health Study, Women's Health Initiative, and Women's Health Study. The median follow-up time of cases was 7.2 years (range 1-26 years). No association was observed between plasma CRP, IL-6, and TNF-αR2 and the risk of pancreatic cancer. Comparing extreme quintiles, the multivariate ORs were 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.74-1.63; Ptrend = 0.81] for CRP, 1.19 (95% CI, 0.81-1.76; Ptrend = 0.08) for IL-6, and 0.88 (95% CI, 0.58-1.33; Ptrend = 0.57) for TNF-αR2. In conclusion, prediagnostic levels of circulating CRP, IL-6, and TNF-αR2 were not associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer, suggesting that systemic inflammation as measured by circulating inflammatory factors is unlikely to play a major role in the development of pancreatic cancer.

11 Article A prospective study of plasma adiponectin and pancreatic cancer risk in five US cohorts. 2013

Bao, Ying / Giovannucci, Edward L / Kraft, Peter / Stampfer, Meir J / Ogino, Shuji / Ma, Jing / Buring, Julie E / Sesso, Howard D / Lee, I-Min / Gaziano, John Michael / Rifai, Nader / Pollak, Michael N / Cochrane, Barbara B / Kaklamani, Virginia / Lin, Jennifer H / Manson, Joann E / Fuchs, Charles S / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ying.bao@channing.harvard.edu ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #23243202.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The adipocyte-secreted hormone adiponectin has insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory properties. Although development of pancreatic cancer is associated with states of insulin resistance and chronic inflammation, the mechanistic basis of the associations is poorly understood. METHODS: To determine whether prediagnostic plasma levels of adiponectin are associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, we conducted a nested case-control study of 468 pancreatic cancer case subjects and 1080 matched control subjects from five prospective US cohorts: Health Professionals Follow-up Study, Nurses' Health Study, Physicians' Health Study, Women's Health Initiative, and Women's Health Study. Control subjects were matched to case subjects by prospective cohort, year of birth, smoking status, fasting status, and month of blood draw. All samples for plasma adiponectin were handled identically in a single batch. Odds ratios were calculated with conditional logistic regression, and linearity of the association between adiponectin and pancreatic cancer was modeled with restricted cubic spline regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Median plasma adiponectin was lower in case subjects versus control subjects (6.2 vs 6.8 µg/mL, P = .009). Plasma adiponectin was inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk, which was consistent across the five prospective cohorts (P (heterogeneity) = .49) and independent of other markers of insulin resistance (eg, diabetes, body mass index, physical activity, plasma C-peptide). Compared with the lowest quintile of adiponectin, individuals in quintiles 2 to 5 had multivariable odds ratios ([ORs] 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) of OR = 0.61 (95% CI = 0.43 to 0.86), OR = 0.58 (95% CI = 0.41 to 0.84), OR = 0.59 (95% CI = 0.40 to 0.87), and OR = 0.66 (95% CI = 0.44 to 0.97), respectively (P (trend) = .04). Restricted cubic spline regression confirmed a nonlinear association (P (nonlinearity) < .01). The association was not modified by sex, smoking, body mass index, physical activity, or C-peptide (all P (interaction) > .10). CONCLUSIONS: In this pooled analysis, low prediagnostic levels of circulating adiponectin were associated with an elevated risk of pancreatic cancer.

12 Article Metformin and pancreatic cancer: a clue requiring investigation. 2012

Pollak, Michael. ·Department of Oncology, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research of the Jewish General Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. michael.pollak@mcgill.ca ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #22465829.

ABSTRACT: Laboratory models show antineoplastic activity of metformin under certain conditions, and pharmacoepidemiologic studies have reported reduced cancer burden among diabetics taking metformin. Therefore, the hypothesis that metformin has antineoplastic activity is receiving increasing attention. However, gaps in knowledge must be addressed before metformin can be "repurposed" for oncologic indications.

13 Article Serum C-reactive protein and risk of pancreatic cancer in two nested, case-control studies. 2011

Douglas, Jason B / Silverman, Debra T / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Graubard, Barry I / Pollak, Michael N / Tao, Yuzhen / Virtamo, Jarmo / Albanes, Demetrius / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland, USA. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #21173171.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Many epidemiologic studies have examined the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) and risk of cancer with inconsistent results. METHODS: We conducted two nested, case-control studies in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC) and Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) to test whether prediagnostic circulating CRP concentrations were associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Between 1985 and 2004, 311 cases occurred in ATBC and between 1994 and 2006, 182 cases occurred in PLCO. Controls (n = 510 in ATBC, n = 374 in PLCO) were alive at the time the case was diagnosed and were matched by age, date of blood draw, sex, and race. We used conditional logistic regression adjusted for smoking to calculate OR and 95% CI for pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: CRP concentrations (ng/mL) tended to be inversely or not associated with pancreatic cancer risk in ATBC, PLCO, and combined analyses [per standardized quintile increase in CRP, continuous OR = 0.94 (95% CI, 0.89-0.99), OR = 0.99 (95% CI, 0.95-1.04), OR = 0.98 (95% CI, 0.95-1.01), respectively]. In combined analyses, we observed a significant interaction (P(interaction) = 0.02) such that inverse associations were suggestive in younger (OR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.90-1.01), but not older, participants. CONCLUSION: Our results do not support the hypothesis that higher CRP concentrations are associated with incident pancreatic cancer. IMPACT: Our results highlight the importance of investigating more specific biomarkers for inflammation that may reflect the biological mechanisms underlying pancreatic cancer in prospective cohort studies.

14 Article Serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio and risk of pancreatic cancer in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial. 2010

Douglas, Jason B / Silverman, Debra T / Pollak, Michael N / Tao, Yuzhen / Soliman, Amr S / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland, USA. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #20699371.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Experimental evidence suggests that an overexpression of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I is implicated in human pancreatic tumors. Increased IGF-II and decreased IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-3 serum concentrations have been linked to a number of other cancers. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial cohort of men and women 55 to 74 years of age at baseline to test whether prediagnostic circulating IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, and IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio concentrations were associated with exocrine pancreatic cancer risk. Between 1994 and 2006, 187 incident cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma occurred (follow-up of up to 11.7 years). Two controls (n = 374), who were alive at the time the case was diagnosed, were selected for each case and matched by age, race, sex, and date of blood draw. We calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) with the use of conditional logistic regression, adjusting for smoking. RESULTS: IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFBP-3 concentrations were not significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (highest compared with lowest quartile: OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 0.91-2.76; and P-trend = 0.25; OR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.49-1.50; and P-trend = 0.31; and OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.51-1.51; and P-trend = 0.47, respectively). However, a significant positive trend was observed with high IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio levels (highest compared with lowest quartile: OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 0.89-2.66; P-trend = 0.04). CONCLUSION: A higher IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio represents increased free IGF-I, which may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. IMPACT: Our results highlight the importance of this biomarker for further investigation in large prospective cohort studies and pooled analysis with other prospective cohorts.