Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Petra H. Peeters
Based on 11 articles published since 2010
(Why 11 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Petra H. Peeters wrote the following 11 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article CA19-9 and apolipoprotein-A2 isoforms as detection markers for pancreatic cancer: a prospective evaluation. 2019

Honda, Kazufumi / Katzke, Verena A / Hüsing, Anika / Okaya, Shinobu / Shoji, Hirokazu / Onidani, Kaoru / Olsen, Anja / Tjønneland, Anne / Overvad, Kim / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Vineis, Paolo / Muller, David / Tsilidis, Kostas / Palli, Domenico / Pala, Valeria / Tumino, Rosario / Naccarati, Alessio / Panico, Salvatore / Aleksandrova, Krasimira / Boeing, Heiner / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Peeters, Petra H / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Lagiou, Pagona / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Travis, Ruth C / Merino, Susana / Duell, Eric J / Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel / Chirlaque, María Dolores / Barricarte, Aurelio / Rebours, Vinciane / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Chiristine / Romana Mancini, Francesca / Brennan, Paul / Scelo, Ghislaine / Manjer, Jonas / Sund, Malin / Öhlund, Daniel / Canzian, Federico / Kaaks, Rudolf. ·Department of Biomarker for Early Detection of Cancer, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan. · Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED) CREST, Tokyo, Japan. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece. · Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute - ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, Ragusa, Italy. · Department of Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology, IIGM - Italian Institute for Genomic Medicine, Torino, Italy. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE), Nuthetal, Germany. · Department of Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Medicine, WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain, Acknowledgment of funds: Regional Government of Asturias. · PanC4 Consortium, Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública. Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain, Ronda de Levante, Murcia, Spain. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain. · Pancreatology Unit, Beaujon Hospital, Clichy, France. · INSERM - UMR 1149, University Paris 7, Paris, France. · CESP, INSERM U1018, Univ. Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France. · Lifestyle, Genes and Health: Integrative Trans-Generational Epidemiology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Section of Genetics, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), World Health Organization, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Surgical and Preoperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Radiation Sciences and Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Genomic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30259989.

ABSTRACT: Recently, we identified unique processing patterns of apolipoprotein A2 (ApoA2) in patients with pancreatic cancer. Our study provides a first prospective evaluation of an ApoA2 isoform ("ApoA2-ATQ/AT"), alone and in combination with carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), as an early detection biomarker for pancreatic cancer. We performed ELISA measurements of CA19-9 and ApoA2-ATQ/AT in 156 patients with pancreatic cancer and 217 matched controls within the European EPIC cohort, using plasma samples collected up to 60 months prior to diagnosis. The detection discrimination statistics were calculated for risk scores by strata of lag-time. For CA19-9, in univariate marker analyses, C-statistics to distinguish future pancreatic cancer patients from cancer-free individuals were 0.80 for plasma taken ≤6 months before diagnosis, and 0.71 for >6-18 months; for ApoA2-ATQ/AT, C-statistics were 0.62, and 0.65, respectively. Joint models based on ApoA2-ATQ/AT plus CA19-9 significantly improved discrimination within >6-18 months (C = 0.74 vs. 0.71 for CA19-9 alone, p = 0.022) and ≤ 18 months (C = 0.75 vs. 0.74, p = 0.022). At 98% specificity, and for lag times of ≤6, >6-18 or ≤ 18 months, sensitivities were 57%, 36% and 43% for CA19-9 combined with ApoA2-ATQ/AT, respectively, vs. 50%, 29% and 36% for CA19-9 alone. Compared to CA19-9 alone, the combination of CA19-9 and ApoA2-ATQ/AT may improve detection of pancreatic cancer up to 18 months prior to diagnosis under usual care, and may provide a useful first measure for pancreatic cancer detection prior to imaging.

2 Article Mediterranean diet adherence and risk of pancreatic cancer: A pooled analysis of two Dutch cohorts. 2019

Schulpen, Maya / Peeters, Petra H / van den Brandt, Piet A. ·Maastricht University Medical Centre, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Maastricht University Medical Centre, CAPHRI - School for Public Health and Primary Care, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht, The Netherlands. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30230536.

ABSTRACT: 3w?>Studies investigating the association of Mediterranean diet (MD) adherence with pancreatic cancer risk are limited and had inconsistent results. We examined the association between MD adherence and pancreatic cancer incidence by pooling data from the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS, 120,852 subjects) and the Dutch cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-NL, 40,011 subjects). MD adherence was assessed using alternate and modified Mediterranean diet scores (aMED and mMED, respectively), including and excluding alcohol. After median follow-ups of 20.3 (NLCS) and 19.2 (EPIC-NL) years, 449 microscopically confirmed pancreatic cancer (MCPC) cases were included in study-specific multivariable Cox models. Study-specific estimates were pooled using a random-effects model. MD adherence was not significantly associated with MCPC risk in pooled and study-specific analyses, regardless of sex and MD score. Pooled hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for high (6-8) compared to low (0-3) values of mMED excluding alcohol were 0.66 (0.40-1.10) in men and 0.94 (0.63-1.40) in women. In never smokers, mMED excluding alcohol seemed to be inversely associated with MCPC risk (nonsignificant). However, no association was observed in ever smokers (p

3 Article Dietary folate intake and pancreatic cancer risk: Results from the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition. 2019

Park, Jin Young / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Ferrari, Pietro / Weiderpass, Elisabete / de Batlle, Jordi / Tjønneland, Anne / Kyro, Cecilie / Rebours, Vinciane / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Mancini, Francesca Romana / Katzke, Verena / Kühn, Tilman / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / La Vecchia, Carlo / Kritikou, Maria / Masala, Giovanna / Pala, Valeria / Tumino, Rosario / Panico, Salvatore / Peeters, Petra H / Skeie, Guri / Merino, Susana / Duell, Eric J / Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel / Dorronsoro, Miren / Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores / Ardanaz, Eva / Gylling, Björn / Schneede, Jörn / Ericson, Ulrika / Sternby, Hanna / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Bradbury, Kathryn E / Huybrechts, Inge / Aune, Dagfinn / Vineis, Paolo / Slimani, Nadia. ·International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. · Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Group of Translational Research in Respiratory Medicine, IRBLleida, Hospital Universitari Arnau de Vilanova and Santa Maria, Lleida, Spain. · Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), Madrid, Spain. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Pancreatology Unit, Beaujon Hospital, Clichy, France. · INSERM-UMR 1149, University Paris 7, France. · CESP, INSERM U1018, University of Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Université Paris-Saclay, France. · Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Cancer Epidemiology, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition (DIfE) Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research, Prevention and Clinical Network-ISPRO, Florence, Italy. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, IRCCS Foundation National Cancer Institute, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, 'Civic-M.P. Arezzo' Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Italy. · Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology-IDIBELL, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain. · CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Dirección de Salud Pública y Adicciones, Gobierno Vasco, Vitoria, Spain. · Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Biodonostia, San Sebastián, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Department of Health and Social Sciences, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain. · Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Pharmacology and Clinical Neurosciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Diabetes and Cardiovascular disease, Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Sweden. · Department of Surgery, Institution of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Sweden. · Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, United Kingdom. · Bjørknes University College, Oslo, Norway. · IIGM Foundation, Turin, Italy. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30178496.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer (PC) has an exceptionally low survival rate and primary prevention strategies are limited. Folate plays an important role in one-carbon metabolism and has been associated with the risk of several cancers, but not consistently with PC risk. We aimed to investigate the association between dietary folate intake and PC risk, using the standardised folate database across 10 European countries. A total of 477,206 participants were followed up for 11 years, during which 865 incident primary PC cases were recorded. Folate intake was energy-adjusted using the residual method. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. In multivariable analyses stratified by age, sex, study centre and adjusted for energy intake, smoking status, BMI, educational level, diabetes status, supplement use and dietary fibre intake, we found no significant association between folate intake and PC risk: the HR of PC risk for those in the highest quartile of folate intake (≥353 μg/day) compared to the lowest (<241 μg/day) was 0.81 (95% CI: 0.51, 1.31; p

4 Article Lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. 2018

Naudin, Sabine / Li, Kuanrong / Jaouen, Tristan / Assi, Nada / Kyrø, Cecilie / Tjønneland, Anne / Overvad, Kim / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Rebours, Vinciane / Védié, Anne-Laure / Boeing, Heiner / Kaaks, Rudolf / Katzke, Verena / Bamia, Christina / Naska, Androniki / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Berrino, Franco / Tagliabue, Giovanna / Palli, Domenico / Panico, Salvatore / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Peeters, Petra H / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Gram, Inger Torhild / Skeie, Guri / Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores / Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel / Barricarte, Aurelio / Quirós, Jose Ramón / Dorronsoro, Miren / Johansson, Ingegerd / Sund, Malin / Sternby, Hanna / Bradbury, Kathryn E / Wareham, Nick / Riboli, Elio / Gunter, Marc / Brennan, Paul / Duell, Eric J / Ferrari, Pietro. ·Nutritional Methodology and Biostatistics Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · CESP, INSERM U1018, University of Paris-Sud, UVSQ, University of Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France. · Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Pancreatology Unit, Beaujon Hospital, Clichy, France. · INSERM U1149, University Paris 7, Paris, France. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE), Potsdam, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Preventive & Predictive Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Lombardy Cancer Registry Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute (ISPO), Florence, Italy. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, Civic M.P.Arezzo Hospital, Ragusa, Italy, Ragusa, Italy. · Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Hospital and Center for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Città della Salute e della Scienza University, Turin, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala, Malaysia, Lumpur. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Department of Health and Social Sciences, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Biosanitary Investigation Institute (IBS) of Granada, University Hospital and University of Granada, Granada, Spain. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Subdirección de Salud Pública de Gipuzkoa, Gobierno Vasco, San Sebastian, Spain. · Department of Odontology, Cariology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Surgery, Institution of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Nutrition and Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-Idibell), Barcelona, Spain. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #29524225.

ABSTRACT: Recent evidence suggested a weak relationship between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer (PC) risk. In our study, the association between lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and the risk of PC was evaluated, including the type of alcoholic beverages and potential interaction with smoking. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, 1,283 incident PC (57% women) were diagnosed from 476,106 cancer-free participants, followed up for 14 years. Amounts of lifetime and baseline alcohol were estimated through lifestyle and dietary questionnaires, respectively. Cox proportional hazard models with age as primary time variable were used to estimate PC hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence interval (CI). Alcohol intake was positively associated with PC risk in men. Associations were mainly driven by extreme alcohol levels, with HRs comparing heavy drinkers (>60 g/day) to the reference category (0.1-4.9 g/day) equal to 1.77 (95% CI: 1.06, 2.95) and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.16, 2.29) for lifetime and baseline alcohol, respectively. Baseline alcohol intakes from beer (>40 g/day) and spirits/liquors (>10 g/day) showed HRs equal to 1.58 (95% CI: 1.07, 2.34) and 1.41 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.94), respectively, compared to the reference category (0.1-2.9 g/day). In women, HR estimates did not reach statistically significance. The alcohol and PC risk association was not modified by smoking status. Findings from a large prospective study suggest that baseline and lifetime alcohol intakes were positively associated with PC risk, with more apparent risk estimates for beer and spirits/liquors than wine intake.

5 Article Do pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis share the same genetic risk factors? A PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium investigation. 2018

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Capurso, Gabriele / Hackert, Thilo / Di Leo, Milena / Izbicki, Jakob R / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Gioffreda, Domenica / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Pasquali, Claudio / Macinga, Peter / Kaaks, Rudolf / Stigliano, Serena / Peeters, Petra H / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Vodicka, Pavel / Valente, Roberto / Vashist, Yogesh K / Salvia, Roberto / Papaconstantinou, Ioannis / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Valsuani, Chiara / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Gazouli, Maria / Valantiene, Irena / Niesen, Willem / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Hara, Kazuo / Soucek, Pavel / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Johnson, Theron / Brenner, Herman / Tavano, Francesca / Fogar, Paola / Ito, Hidemi / Sperti, Cosimo / Butterbach, Katja / Latiano, Anna / Andriulli, Angelo / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Busch, Olivier R C / Dijk, Frederike / Greenhalf, William / Matsuo, Keitaro / Lombardo, Carlo / Strobel, Oliver / König, Anna-Katharina / Cuk, Katarina / Strothmann, Hendrik / Katzke, Verena / Cantore, Maurizio / Mambrini, Andrea / Oliverius, Martin / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Landi, Stefano / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Sciences and Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Visceral Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Second Department of Surgery, Aretaieion Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Massa and Carrara, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Epidemiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Institute for Health Research, Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28913878.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a very aggressive tumor with a five-year survival of less than 6%. Chronic pancreatitis (CP), an inflammatory process in of the pancreas, is a strong risk factor for PDAC. Several genetic polymorphisms have been discovered as susceptibility loci for both CP and PDAC. Since CP and PDAC share a consistent number of epidemiologic risk factors, the aim of this study was to investigate whether specific CP risk loci also contribute to PDAC susceptibility. We selected five common SNPs (rs11988997, rs379742, rs10273639, rs2995271 and rs12688220) that were identified as susceptibility markers for CP and analyzed them in 2,914 PDAC cases, 356 CP cases and 5,596 controls retrospectively collected in the context of the international PANDoRA consortium. We found a weak association between the minor allele of the PRSS1-PRSS2-rs10273639 and an increased risk of developing PDAC (OR

6 Article Plasma microRNAs as biomarkers of pancreatic cancer risk in a prospective cohort study. 2017

Duell, Eric J / Lujan-Barroso, Leila / Sala, Núria / Deitz McElyea, Samantha / Overvad, Kim / Tjonneland, Anne / Olsen, Anja / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Busund, Lill-Tove / Moi, Line / Muller, David / Vineis, Paolo / Aune, Dagfinn / Matullo, Giuseppe / Naccarati, Alessio / Panico, Salvatore / Tagliabue, Giovanna / Tumino, Rosario / Palli, Domenico / Kaaks, Rudolf / Katzke, Verena A / Boeing, Heiner / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Peeters, Petra H / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Lagiou, Pagona / Kotanidou, Anastasia / Travis, Ruth C / Wareham, Nick / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Ramon Quiros, Jose / Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel / Dorronsoro, Miren / Chirlaque, María-Dolores / Ardanaz, Eva / Severi, Gianluca / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Rebours, Vinciane / Brennan, Paul / Gunter, Marc / Scelo, Ghislaine / Cote, Greg / Sherman, Stuart / Korc, Murray. ·Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN. · Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Clinical Pathology, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromso, Norway. · Department of Medical Biology, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromso, Norway. · School of Public Health, Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Turin, Italy. · Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Lombardy Cancer Registry Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P, Arezzo" Hospital, ASP, Ragusa, Italy. · Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany. · Dt. for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Dt. of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Dt. of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Dept of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Dept of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Dept. of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Department of Critical Care Medicine & Pulmonary Services, University of Athens Medical School, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Andalusian School of Public Health, Research Insititute Biosanitary Granada, University Hospital Granada/University of Granada, Granada. · CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebatian, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Authority, Murcia, Spain. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain. · Université Paris-Saclay, Université Paris-Sud, UVSQ, CESP, INSERM, Villejuif, France. · Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Beaujon Hospital, Pancreatology Unit, Clichy, France. · INSERM, University Paris, France. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC. · Departments of Medicine and Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN. · Pancreatic Cancer Signature Center, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, IN. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28542740.

ABSTRACT: Noninvasive biomarkers for early pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) diagnosis and disease risk stratification are greatly needed. We conducted a nested case-control study within the Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort to evaluate prediagnostic microRNAs (miRs) as biomarkers of subsequent PDAC risk. A panel of eight miRs (miR-10a, -10b, -21-3p, -21-5p, -30c, -106b, -155 and -212) based on previous evidence from our group was evaluated in 225 microscopically confirmed PDAC cases and 225 controls matched on center, sex, fasting status and age/date/time of blood collection. MiR levels in prediagnostic plasma samples were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Logistic regression was used to model levels and PDAC risk, adjusting for covariates and to estimate area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). Plasma miR-10b, -21-5p, -30c and -106b levels were significantly higher in cases diagnosed within 2 years of blood collection compared to matched controls (all p-values <0.04). Based on adjusted logistic regression models, levels for six miRs (miR-10a, -10b, -21-5p, -30c, -155 and -212) overall, and for four miRs (-10a, -10b, -21-5p and -30c) at shorter follow-up time between blood collection and diagnosis (≤5 yr, ≤2 yr), were statistically significantly associated with risk. A score based on the panel showed a linear dose-response trend with risk (p-value = 0.0006). For shorter follow-up (≤5 yr), AUC for the score was 0.73, and for individual miRs ranged from 0.73 (miR-212) to 0.79 (miR-21-5p).

7 Article Mediterranean diet and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. 2017

Molina-Montes, Esther / Sánchez, María-José / Buckland, Genevieve / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Amiano, Pilar / Wark, Petra A / Kühn, Tilman / Katzke, Verena / Huerta, José María / Ardanaz, Eva / Quirós, José Ramón / Affret, Aurélie / His, Mathilde / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Peeters, Petra H / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Boeing, Heiner / Iqbal, Khalid / Ohlsson, Bodil / Sonestedt, Emily / Tjønneland, Anne / Petersen, Kristina En / Travis, Ruth C / Skeie, Guri / Agnoli, Claudia / Panico, Salvatore / Palli, Domenico / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Freisling, Heinz / Huybrechts, Inge / Overvad, Kim / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Bamia, Christina / Vasilopoulou, Effie / Wareham, Nick / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Cross, Amanda J / Ward, Heather A / Riboli, Elio / Duell, Eric J. ·Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · Andalusian School of Public Health, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA. Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastián, Spain. · Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DFKZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Université Paris-Saclay, Université Paris-Sud, UVSQ, CESP Generations and Health Team, INSERM, Villejuif, France. · Gustave Roussy, Villejuif F-94805, France. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany. · Department of Internal Medicine, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, 'Civic-M.P.Arezzo' Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Ragusa, Italy. · Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Citta' della Salute e della Scienza Hospital, University of Turin and Centre for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Turin, Italy. · Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France. · Department of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · Medical Research Council (MCR), Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge, UK. · University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #28170373.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The Mediterranean diet (MD) has been proposed as a means for cancer prevention, but little evidence has been accrued regarding its potential to prevent pancreatic cancer. We investigated the association between the adherence to the MD and pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. METHODS: Over half a million participants from 10 European countries were followed up for over 11 years, after which 865 newly diagnosed exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were identified. Adherence to the MD was estimated through an adapted score without the alcohol component (arMED) to discount alcohol-related harmful effects. Cox proportional hazards regression models, stratified by age, sex and centre, and adjusted for energy intake, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake and diabetes status at recruitment, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) associated with pancreatic cancer and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Adherence to the arMED score was not associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (HR high vs low adherence=0.99; 95% CI: 0.77-1.26, and HR per increments of two units in adherence to arMED=1.00; 95% CI: 0.94-1.06). There was no convincing evidence for heterogeneity by smoking status, body mass index, diabetes or European region. There was also no evidence of significant associations in analyses involving microscopically confirmed cases, plausible reporters of energy intake or other definitions of the MD pattern. CONCLUSIONS: A high adherence to the MD is not associated with pancreatic cancer risk in the EPIC study.

8 Article Sweet-beverage consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). 2016

Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva M / Wark, Petra A / Romaguera, Dora / Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala / Michaud, Dominique / Molina-Montes, Esther / Tjønneland, Anne / Olsen, Anja / Overvad, Kim / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Fagherazzi, Guy / Katzke, Verena A / Kühn, Tilman / Steffen, Annika / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Klinaki, Eleni / Papatesta, Eleni-Maria / Masala, Giovanna / Krogh, Vittorio / Tumino, Rosario / Naccarati, Alessio / Mattiello, Amalia / Peeters, Petra H / Rylander, Charlotta / Parr, Christine L / Skeie, Guri / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Quirós, J Ramón / Duell, Eric J / Dorronsoro, Miren / Huerta, José María / Ardanaz, Eva / Wareham, Nick / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Travis, Ruth C / Key, Tim / Stepien, Magdalena / Freisling, Heinz / Riboli, Elio / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas. ·Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Miguel Hernández University, Alicante, Spain; The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; · Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Medical Research Institute of Palma, University Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain; mariaadoracion.romaguera@ssib.es. · Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; · Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Andalusian School of Public Health. Biomedical Research Institute of Granada; University Hospital of Granada/Granada University, Granada, Spain; · Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark; · Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark; · Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health team, National Institute for Health and Medical Research, Villejuif, France; UMRS 1018, Université Paris Sud, Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany; · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany; · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece; Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece; · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece; · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy; · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit. Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy; · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Italy; · Human Genetics Foundation,Torino, Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Torino, Italy; · Dipartamento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy; · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Netherlands; · Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø-the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; · Department of Chronic Diseases, Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; · Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø-the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, Finland; · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain; · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Public Health Direction Biodonostia Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Navarre Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; · Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit. · Department of Public Health and Primary Care, and Clinical Gerontology Unit, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; · Nutrition and Metabolism Section, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France; · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands; and. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands; and Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center, Utrecht, Netherlands. ·Am J Clin Nutr · Pubmed #27510540.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The consumption of sweet beverages has been associated with greater risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity, which may be involved in the development of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that sweet beverages may increase pancreatic cancer risk as well. OBJECTIVE: We examined the association between sweet-beverage consumption (including total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drink and juice and nectar consumption) and pancreatic cancer risk. DESIGN: The study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. A total of 477,199 participants (70.2% women) with a mean age of 51 y at baseline were included, and 865 exocrine pancreatic cancers were diagnosed after a median follow-up of 11.60 y (IQR: 10.10-12.60 y). Sweet-beverage consumption was assessed with the use of validated dietary questionnaires at baseline. HRs and 95% CIs were obtained with the use of multivariable Cox regression models that were stratified by age, sex, and center and adjusted for educational level, physical activity, smoking status, and alcohol consumption. Associations with total soft-drink consumption were adjusted for juice and nectar consumption and vice versa. RESULTS: Total soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.07), sugar-sweetened soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.02; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.08), and artificially sweetened soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.10) were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption was inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk (HR per 100 g/d: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84, 0.99); this association remained statistically significant after adjustment for body size, type 2 diabetes, and energy intake. CONCLUSIONS: Soft-drink consumption does not seem to be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption might be associated with a modest decreased pancreatic cancer risk. Additional studies with specific information on juice and nectar subtypes are warranted to clarify these results.

9 Article Flavonoid and lignan intake and pancreatic cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort. 2016

Molina-Montes, Esther / Sánchez, María-José / Zamora-Ros, Raul / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Wark, Petra A / Obon-Santacana, Mireia / Kühn, Tilman / Katzke, Verena / Travis, Ruth C / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Naccarati, Alessio / Mattiello, Amalia / Krogh, Vittorio / Martorana, Caterina / Masala, Giovanna / Amiano, Pilar / Huerta, José-María / Barricarte, Aurelio / Quirós, José-Ramón / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Angell Åsli, Lene / Skeie, Guri / Ericson, Ulrika / Sonestedt, Emily / Peeters, Petra H / Romieu, Isabelle / Scalbert, Augustin / Overvad, Kim / Clemens, Matthias / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Peppa, Eleni / Vidalis, Pavlos / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Olsen, Anja / Tjønneland, Anne / Boutroun-Rualt, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Cross, Amanda J / Lu, Yunxia / Riboli, Elio / Duell, Eric J. ·Andalusian School of Public Health, Instituto De Investigación Biosanitaria Ibs, GRANADA, Hospitales Universitarios De Granada/Universidad De Granada, Granada, Spain. · CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiología Y Salud Pública, Spain. · Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, the School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, the School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-Idibell), Barcelona, Spain. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, HuGeF-Human Genetics Foundation, Torino, Italy. · Dipartimento Di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Registry ASP, Ragusa, Italy. · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastián, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Public Health Institute of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology, and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Epidemiology Unit, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Inserm, CESP Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, France. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #27184434.

ABSTRACT: Despite the potential cancer preventive effects of flavonoids and lignans, their ability to reduce pancreatic cancer risk has not been demonstrated in epidemiological studies. Our aim was to examine the association between dietary intakes of flavonoids and lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. A total of 865 exocrine pancreatic cancer cases occurred after 11.3 years of follow-up of 477,309 cohort members. Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake was estimated through validated dietary questionnaires and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Phenol Explorer databases. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using age, sex and center-stratified Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for energy intake, body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol and diabetes status. Our results showed that neither overall dietary intake of flavonoids nor of lignans were associated with pancreatic cancer risk (multivariable-adjusted HR for a doubling of intake = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.95-1.11 and 1.02; 95% CI: 0.89-1.17, respectively). Statistically significant associations were also not observed by flavonoid subclasses. An inverse association between intake of flavanones and pancreatic cancer risk was apparent, without reaching statistical significance, in microscopically confirmed cases (HR for a doubling of intake = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.91-1.00). In conclusion, we did not observe an association between intake of flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses or lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the EPIC cohort.

10 Article Leukocyte telomere length in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a prospective study. 2014

Campa, Daniele / Mergarten, Björn / De Vivo, Immaculata / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Racine, Antoine / Severi, Gianluca / Nieters, Alexandra / Katzke, Verena A / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Yiannakouris, Nikos / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Boeing, Heiner / Quirós, J Ramón / Duell, Eric J / Molina-Montes, Esther / Huerta, José María / Ardanaz, Eva / Dorronsoro, Miren / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nicholas / Travis, Ruth C / Palli, Domenico / Pala, Valeria / Tumino, Rosario / Naccarati, Alessio / Panico, Salvatore / Vineis, Paolo / Riboli, Elio / Siddiq, Afshan / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Peeters, Petra H / Nilsson, Peter M / Sund, Malin / Ye, Weimin / Lund, Eiliv / Jareid, Mie / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Duarte-Salles, Talita / Kong, So Yeon / Stepien, Magdalena / Canzian, Federico / Kaaks, Rudolf. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Program in Genetic Epidemiology and Statistical Genetics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), Centre for research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones, and Women's Health team, Villejuif, France. Univ Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France. IGR, Villejuif, France. · Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Torino, Italy. · Center for Chronic Immunodeficiency, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Harokopio University of Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment, and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada (Granada.ibs), Granada, Spain. CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, Murcia, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. Navarre Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Direction and Biodonostia-Ciberesp Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain. · University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute, ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Ragusa, Italy. · Dipartimento Di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Genomics of Common Disease, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö Sweden. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, Finland. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. r.kaaks@dkfz.de. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #25103821.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Several studies have examined leukocyte telomere length (LTL) as a possible predictor for cancer at various organ sites. The hypothesis originally motivating many of these studies was that shorter telomeres would be associated with an increase in cancer risk; the results of epidemiologic studies have been inconsistent, however, and suggested positive, negative, or null associations. Two studies have addressed the association of LTL in relation to pancreatic cancer risk and the results are contrasting. METHODS: We measured LTL in a prospective study of 331 pancreatic cancer cases and 331 controls in the context of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). RESULTS: We observed that the mean LTL was higher in cases (0.59 ± 0.20) than in controls (0.57 ± 0.17), although this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.07), and a basic logistic regression model showed no association of LTL with pancreas cancer risk. When adjusting for levels of HbA1c and C-peptide, however, there was a weakly positive association between longer LTL and pancreatic cancer risk [OR, 1.13; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.27]. Additional analyses by cubic spline regression suggested a possible nonlinear relationship between LTL and pancreatic cancer risk (P = 0.022), with a statistically nonsignificant increase in risk at very low LTL, as well as a significant increase at high LTL. CONCLUSION: Taken together, the results from our study do not support LTL as a uniform and strong predictor of pancreatic cancer. IMPACT: The results of this article can provide insights into telomere dynamics and highlight the complex relationship between LTL and pancreatic cancer risk.

11 Article Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in childhood and incidence of cancer in adulthood in never smokers in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2011

Chuang, Shu-Chun / Gallo, Valentina / Michaud, Dominique / Overvad, Kim / Tjønneland, Anne / Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise / Romieu, Isabelle / Straif, Kurt / Palli, Domenico / Pala, Valeria / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / Panico, Salvatore / Peeters, Petra H / Lund, Eiliv / Gram, Inger Torhild / Manjer, Jonas / Borgquist, Signe / Riboli, Elio / Vineis, Paolo. ·School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, W2 1PG, London, UK. s-c.chuang@imperial.ac.uk ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #21279734.

ABSTRACT: The association between childhood environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure and adult cancer risk is controversial; we examined this relationship in never smokers within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Over an average of 10 years, 8,372 cases of cancer were diagnosed in 112,430 never smokers in EPIC. Childhood ETS was self-reported by participants at baseline, along with other lifestyle factors. Hazard ratios (HR) for ETS exposure in childhood and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards models stratified by age, sex, and study center and adjusted for education, alcohol drinking, body mass index, physical activity, non-alcoholic energy intake, fruit and vegetable intake, and adulthood ETS exposure. Models were further adjusted for reproductive factors for female cancers, for meat intake for digestive system cancers, and for diabetes status for pancreatic cancer. No association was observed between childhood ETS exposure and overall cancer risks (HR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.92-1.02), and for selected sites. The only exception was pancreatic cancer, as previously reported by Vrieling et al., among those who had been exposed daily in childhood (overall HR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.14-3.84). In conclusion, childhood ETS exposure might not be a major risk factor for common cancers in adulthood.