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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Claudio Pasquali
Based on 29 articles published since 2009
(Why 29 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Claudio Pasquali wrote the following 29 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Guideline Italian consensus guidelines for the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of cystic pancreatic neoplasms. 2014

Anonymous4750793 / Anonymous4760793 / Buscarini, Elisabetta / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Cannizzaro, Renato / De Angelis, Claudio / Gion, Massimo / Morana, Giovanni / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Arcidiacono, Paolo / Balzano, Gianpaolo / Barresi, Luca / Basso, Daniela / Bocus, Paolo / Calculli, Lucia / Capurso, Gabriele / Canzonieri, Vincenzo / Casadei, Riccardo / Crippa, Stefano / D'Onofrio, Mirko / Frulloni, Luca / Fusaroli, Pietro / Manfredi, Guido / Pacchioni, Donatella / Pasquali, Claudio / Rocca, Rodolfo / Ventrucci, Maurizio / Venturini, Silvia / Villanacci, Vincenzo / Zerbi, Alessandro / Falconi, Massimo / Anonymous4770793. ·Gastroenterology Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Crema, Italy. Electronic address: ebuscarini@rim.it. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, CRO-National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department, A.O. San Giovanni Battista/Molinette, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Department of Clinical Pathology, AULSS 12, Venice, Italy. · Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Ospedale Cà Foncello, Treviso, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vita-Salute, Italy. · Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, ISMETT, Palermo, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital, Padua, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Ospedale Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria, Negrar, Verona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome at S. Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Division of Pathology, CRO-National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano, Italy. · Department of Surgery, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Unit, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy. · Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgical and Gastroenterological Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Crema, Italy. · Pathology Unit, A.O. San Giovanni Battista/Molinette, Turin, Italy. · Surgery Unit IV, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Gastroenterology Unit, Mauriziano Hospital, Turin, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, Bentivoglio Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · 2nd Pathology Section, Spedali Civili, Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #24809235.

ABSTRACT: This report contains clinically oriented guidelines for the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of cystic pancreatic neoplasms in patients fit for treatment. The statements were elaborated by working groups of experts by searching and analysing the literature, and then underwent a consensus process using a modified Delphi procedure. The statements report recommendations regarding the most appropriate use and timing of various imaging techniques and of endoscopic ultrasound, the role of circulating and intracystic markers and the pathologic evaluation for the diagnosis and follow-up of cystic pancreatic neoplasms.

2 Review Leiomyosarcoma of the Pancreas with Liver Metastases as a Paradigm of Multimodality Treatment: Case Report and Review of the Literature. 2012

Moletta, Lucia / Sperti, Cosimo / Beltrame, Valentina / Gruppo, Mario / Blandamura, Stella / Pasquali, Claudio / Pedrazzoli, Sergio. ·Department of Surgical, Oncological, and Gastroenterological Sciences, 4th Surgical Clinic, University of Padua, via Giustiniani 2, 35128, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgical, Oncological, and Gastroenterological Sciences, 4th Surgical Clinic, University of Padua, via Giustiniani 2, 35128, Padova, Italy. csperti@libero.it. · Clinica Chirurgica Geriatrica, University of Padua, Padova, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University of Padua, Padova, Italy. ·J Gastrointest Cancer · Pubmed #22733567.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Clinical Trial Clinicopathological features of pancreatic endocrine tumors: a prospective multicenter study in Italy of 297 sporadic cases. 2010

Zerbi, Alessandro / Falconi, Massimo / Rindi, Guido / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Tomassetti, Paola / Pasquali, Claudio / Capitanio, Vanessa / Boninsegna, Letizia / Di Carlo, Valerio / Anonymous6020648. ·Department of Surgery, Pancreas Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. zerbi.alessandro@hsr.it ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #20087335.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Information on pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) comes mostly from small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies conducted on highly selected patients. The aim of the study was to describe the clinical and pathological features of PETs in a prospective, multicenter study. METHODS: Newly diagnosed, histologically proven, sporadic PETs observed from June 2004 to March 2007 in 24 Italian centers were included in a specific data set. RESULTS: Two hundred ninety-seven patients (mean age 58.6+/-14.7 years, females 51.2%, males 48.8%) were analyzed. In 73 cases (24.6%), the tumor was functioning (F) (53 insulinomas, 15 gastrinomas, 5 other syndromes) and in 232 (75.4%) it was non-functioning (NF); in 115 cases (38.7%), the diagnosis was incidental. The median tumor size was 20 mm (range 2-150). NF-PETs were significantly more represented among carcinomas (P<0.001). Nodal and liver metastases were detected in 84 (28.3%) and 85 (28.6%) cases, respectively. The presence of liver metastases was significantly higher in the NF-PETs than in the F-PETs (32.1% vs. 17.8%; P<0.05), and in the symptomatic than in the asymptomatic patients (34.6% vs. 19.1%; P<0.005). At the time of recruitment, the majority of patients (251, 84.5%) had undergone surgery, with complete resection in 209 cases (83.3%). CONCLUSIONS: This study points out the high number of new cases of PETs observed in Italy, with a high prevalence of NF and incidentally discovered forms. The size of the tumor was smaller and the rate of metastasis was lower than usually reported, suggesting a trend toward an earlier diagnosis.

4 Article Genetic determinants of telomere length and risk of pancreatic cancer: A PANDoRA study. 2019

Campa, Daniele / Matarazzi, Martina / Greenhalf, William / Bijlsma, Maarten / Saum, Kai-Uwe / Pasquali, Claudio / van Laarhoven, Hanneke / Szentesi, Andrea / Federici, Francesca / Vodicka, Pavel / Funel, Niccola / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Vodickova, Ludmila / Basso, Daniela / Obazee, Ofure / Hackert, Thilo / Soucek, Pavel / Cuk, Katarina / Kaiser, Jörg / Sperti, Cosimo / Lovecek, Martin / Capurso, Gabriele / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Khaw, Kay-Tee / König, Anna-Katharina / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kaaks, Rudolf / Bambi, Franco / Archibugi, Livia / Mambrini, Andrea / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Landi, Stefano / Hegyi, Péter / Izbicki, Jakob R / Gioffreda, Domenica / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Tavano, Francesca / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Key, Timothy J / Fave, Gianfranco Delle / Strobel, Oliver / Jonaitis, Laimas / Andriulli, Angelo / Lawlor, Rita T / Pirozzi, Felice / Katzke, Verena / Valsuani, Chiara / Vashist, Yogesh K / Brenner, Hermann / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute for Translational Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary. · First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Italy. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Third Surgical Clinic - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery I, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University, Rome, Italy. · PancreatoBiliary Endoscopy and EUS Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Institute of Molecular and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · MTA-SZTE Momentum Translational Gastroenterology Research Group, Szeged, Hungary. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Molecular Biology Lab, IRCCS Ospedale Casa Sollievo Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · ARC-NET, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Abdominal Surgery, IRCCS Ospedale Casa Sollievo Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30325019.

ABSTRACT: Telomere deregulation is a hallmark of cancer. Telomere length measured in lymphocytes (LTL) has been shown to be a risk marker for several cancers. For pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) consensus is lacking whether risk is associated with long or short telomeres. Mendelian randomization approaches have shown that a score built from SNPs associated with LTL could be used as a robust risk marker. We explored this approach in a large scale study within the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. We analyzed 10 SNPs (ZNF676-rs409627, TERT-rs2736100, CTC1-rs3027234, DHX35-rs6028466, PXK-rs6772228, NAF1-rs7675998, ZNF208-rs8105767, OBFC1-rs9420907, ACYP2-rs11125529 and TERC-rs10936599) alone and combined in a LTL genetic score ("teloscore", which explains 2.2% of the telomere variability) in relation to PDAC risk in 2,374 cases and 4,326 controls. We identified several associations with PDAC risk, among which the strongest were with the TERT-rs2736100 SNP (OR = 1.54; 95%CI 1.35-1.76; p = 1.54 × 10

5 Article Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2018

Klein, Alison P / Wolpin, Brian M / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Mocci, Evelina / Zhang, Mingfeng / Canzian, Federico / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason W / Jermusyk, Ashley / Zhong, Jun / Chen, Fei / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Arslan, Alan A / Babic, Ana / Bamlet, William R / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Berndt, Sonja I / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Borgida, Ayelet / Bracci, Paige M / Brais, Lauren / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Buring, Julie / Campa, Daniele / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Chaffee, Kari G / Chung, Charles C / Cleary, Sean / Cotterchio, Michelle / Dijk, Frederike / Duell, Eric J / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gallinger, Steven / M Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giles, Graham G / Giovannucci, Edward / Goggins, Michael / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Hackert, Thilo / Haiman, Christopher / Hartge, Patricia / Hasan, Manal / Hegyi, Peter / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Herman, Joseph / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert / Hung, Rayjean J / Jacobs, Eric J / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Janout, Vladimir / Kaaks, Rudolf / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Kooperberg, Charles / Kulke, Matthew H / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert J / Laheru, Daniel / Landi, Stefano / Lawlor, Rita T / Lee, I-Min / LeMarchand, Loic / Lu, Lingeng / Malats, Núria / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice / Neale, Rachel E / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Olson, Sara H / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Patel, Alpa V / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scelo, Ghislaine / Sesso, Howard D / Severi, Gianluca / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra / Smith, Jill P / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Tavano, Francesca / Thornquist, Mark D / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vashist, Yogesh / Visvanathan, Kala / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Zhaoming / Wentzensen, Nicolas / White, Emily / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Kraft, Peter / Li, Donghui / Chanock, Stephen / Obazee, Ofure / Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1×5, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 94158, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), 69372, Lyon, France. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), 3720 BA, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, 3584 CX, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, 00185, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, 21702, USA. · Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2L7, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 3M7, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, 08908, Spain. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, 65653, Brno, Czech Republic. · Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, 06510, USA. · Department of Translational Research and The New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Boston VA Healthcare System, Boston, MA, 02132, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 106 79, Athens, Greece. · Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · SWOG Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90032, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77230, USA. · First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, 6725, Szeged, Hungary. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Institute of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Charles University, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, 150 06, Prague 5, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, 30303, USA. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, 02-776, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, 701 03, Ostrava, Czech Republic. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Olomouc, 771 47, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 0SP, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA. · ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, 96813, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), 28029, Madrid, Spain. · CIBERONC, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Carrara, 54033, Italy. · Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare, 00271, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital, 775 20, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Population Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, 4029, Australia. · Department of General Surgery, University of Heidelburg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padua, 35124, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, 40138, Bologna, Italy. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre-CNIO, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Centre de Recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP, Inserm U1018), Facultés de Medicine, Université Paris-Saclay, UPS, UVSQ, Gustave Roussy, 94800, Villejuif, France. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA. · Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, 20057, USA. · Laboratory for Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, 323 00, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, 901 85, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, 90-647, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", 71013, San Giovanni Rotondo, FG, Italy. · Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, 94612, USA. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 142 20, Prague 4, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 14214, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, 38105, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Nat Commun · Pubmed #29422604.

ABSTRACT: In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). Here, we find significant evidence of a novel association at rs78417682 (7p12/TNS3, P = 4.35 × 10

6 Article Common genetic variants associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma may also modify risk of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2018

Obazee, Ofure / Capurso, Gabriele / Tavano, Francesca / Archibugi, Livia / De Bonis, Antonio / Greenhalf, William / Key, Tim / Pasquali, Claudio / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Hackert, Thilo / Fogar, Paola / Liço, Valbona / Dervenis, Christos / Lawlor, Rita T / Landoni, Luca / Gazouli, Maria / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Funel, Niccola / Strobel, Oliver / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Cantù, Cinzia / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Landi, Stefano / Neoptolemos, John P / Basso, Daniela / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Rinzivillo, Maria / Andriulli, Angelo / Canzian, Federico / Campa, Daniele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgical Oncology and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Metropolitan General Hospital, Pireas, Greece. · ARC-NET Center for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #29309705.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNEN) account for less than 5% of all pancreatic neoplasms and genetic association studies on susceptibility to the disease are limited. We sought to identify possible overlap of genetic susceptibility loci between pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and pNEN; therefore, PDAC susceptibility variants (n = 23) from Caucasian genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were genotyped in 369 pNEN cases and 3277 controls from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium to evaluate the odds associated with pNEN risk, disease onset and tumor characteristics. Main effect analyses showed four PDAC susceptibility variants-rs9854771, rs1561927, rs9543325 and rs10919791 to be associated with pNEN risk. Subsequently, only associations with rs9543325, rs10919791 and rs1561927 were noteworthy with false positive report probability (FPRP) tests. Stratified analyses considering age at onset (50-year threshold), showed rs2736098, rs16986825 and rs9854771 to be associated with risk of developing pNEN at a younger age. Stratified analyses also showed some single nucleotide polymorphisms to be associated with different degrees of tumor grade, metastatic potential and functionality. Our results identify known GWAS PDAC susceptibility loci, which may also be involved in sporadic pNEN etiology and suggest that some genetic mechanisms governing pathogenesis of these two entities may be similar, with few of these loci being more influential in younger cases or tumor subtypes.

7 Article Do pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis share the same genetic risk factors? A PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium investigation. 2018

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Capurso, Gabriele / Hackert, Thilo / Di Leo, Milena / Izbicki, Jakob R / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Gioffreda, Domenica / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Pasquali, Claudio / Macinga, Peter / Kaaks, Rudolf / Stigliano, Serena / Peeters, Petra H / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Vodicka, Pavel / Valente, Roberto / Vashist, Yogesh K / Salvia, Roberto / Papaconstantinou, Ioannis / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Valsuani, Chiara / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Gazouli, Maria / Valantiene, Irena / Niesen, Willem / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Hara, Kazuo / Soucek, Pavel / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Johnson, Theron / Brenner, Herman / Tavano, Francesca / Fogar, Paola / Ito, Hidemi / Sperti, Cosimo / Butterbach, Katja / Latiano, Anna / Andriulli, Angelo / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Busch, Olivier R C / Dijk, Frederike / Greenhalf, William / Matsuo, Keitaro / Lombardo, Carlo / Strobel, Oliver / König, Anna-Katharina / Cuk, Katarina / Strothmann, Hendrik / Katzke, Verena / Cantore, Maurizio / Mambrini, Andrea / Oliverius, Martin / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Landi, Stefano / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Sciences and Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Visceral Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Second Department of Surgery, Aretaieion Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Massa and Carrara, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Epidemiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Institute for Health Research, Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28913878.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a very aggressive tumor with a five-year survival of less than 6%. Chronic pancreatitis (CP), an inflammatory process in of the pancreas, is a strong risk factor for PDAC. Several genetic polymorphisms have been discovered as susceptibility loci for both CP and PDAC. Since CP and PDAC share a consistent number of epidemiologic risk factors, the aim of this study was to investigate whether specific CP risk loci also contribute to PDAC susceptibility. We selected five common SNPs (rs11988997, rs379742, rs10273639, rs2995271 and rs12688220) that were identified as susceptibility markers for CP and analyzed them in 2,914 PDAC cases, 356 CP cases and 5,596 controls retrospectively collected in the context of the international PANDoRA consortium. We found a weak association between the minor allele of the PRSS1-PRSS2-rs10273639 and an increased risk of developing PDAC (OR

8 Article Lack of Association for Reported Endocrine Pancreatic Cancer Risk Loci in the PANDoRA Consortium. 2017

Campa, Daniele / Obazee, Ofure / Pastore, Manuela / Panzuto, Francesco / Liço, Valbona / Greenhalf, William / Katzke, Verena / Tavano, Francesca / Costello, Eithne / Corbo, Vincenzo / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Strobel, Oliver / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Neoptolemos, John P / Zerboni, Giulia / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Lombardo, Carlo / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Gioffreda, Domenica / Hackert, Thilo / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Landi, Stefano / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Landoni, Luca / Lawlor, Rita T / Bambi, Franco / Pirozzi, Felice / Basso, Daniela / Pasquali, Claudio / Capurso, Gabriele / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Institute of Translational Medicine, Cancer Research UK Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, United Kingdom. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · The Pancreas Institute, Department of Surgery, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. f.canzian@dkfz.de. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #28765340.

ABSTRACT:

9 Article Common germline variants within the CDKN2A/2B region affect risk of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2016

Campa, Daniele / Capurso, Gabriele / Pastore, Manuela / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Landoni, Luca / Maiello, Evaristo / Lawlor, Rita T / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Funel, Niccola / Gazouli, Maria / De Bonis, Antonio / Klüter, Harald / Rinzivillo, Maria / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Hackert, Thilo / Landi, Stefano / Bugert, Peter / Bambi, Franco / Archibugi, Livia / Scarpa, Aldo / Katzke, Verena / Dervenis, Christos / Liço, Valbona / Furlanello, Sara / Strobel, Oliver / Tavano, Francesca / Basso, Daniela / Kaaks, Rudolf / Pasquali, Claudio / Gentiluomo, Manuel / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Dept of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DISCOG), Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Oncology, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Mannheim Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, Heidelberg University, Medical Faculty Mannheim, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg - Hessen, Mannheim, Germany. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Konstantopouleion General Hospital Nea Ionia, Greece. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), Laboratory Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #28008994.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are heterogeneous neoplasms which represent only 2% of all pancreatic neoplasms by incidence, but 10% by prevalence. Genetic risk factors could have an important role in the disease aetiology, however only a small number of case control studies have been performed yet. To further our knowledge, we genotyped 13 SNPs belonging to the pleiotropic CDKN2A/B gene region in 320 PNET cases and 4436 controls, the largest study on the disease so far. We observed a statistically significant association between the homozygotes for the minor allele of the rs2518719 SNP and an increased risk of developing PNET (OR

10 Article Association of genetic polymorphisms with survival of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. 2016

Rizzato, Cosmeri / Campa, Daniele / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Halloran, Christopher / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Butturini, Giovanni / Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice / Sperti, Cosimo / Tjaden, Christine / Ghaneh, Paula / Hackert, Thilo / Funel, Niccola / Giese, Nathalia / Tavano, Francesca / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Pedata, Mariangela / Pasquali, Claudio / Gazouli, Maria / Mambrini, Andrea / Souček, Pavel / di Sebastiano, Pierluigi / Capurso, Gabriele / Cantore, Maurizio / Oliverius, Martin / Offringa, Rienk / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Strobel, Oliver / Scarpa, Aldo / Canzian, Federico. ·Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery and. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łódź, Łódź, Poland. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, NIHR Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Unit of Surgery B, The Pancreas Institute, Department of Surgery and Oncology, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery and. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", S. Giovanni Rotondo (FG), Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Disease, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Oncological Department, ASL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Science, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo (FG), Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Molecular Oncology of Gastrointestinal Tumors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany and. · ARC-NET, Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, f.canzian@dkfz.de. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #27497070.

ABSTRACT: Germline genetic variability might contribute, at least partially, to the survival of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Two recently performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on PDAC overall survival (OS) suggested (P < 10(-5)) the association between 30 genomic regions and PDAC OS. With the aim to highlight the true associations within these regions, we analyzed 44 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 30 candidate regions in 1722 PDAC patients within the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. We observed statistically significant associations for five of the selected regions. One association in the CTNNA2 gene on chromosome 2p12 [rs1567532, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-2.58, P = 0.005 for homozygotes for the minor allele] and one in the last intron of the RUNX2 gene on chromosome 6p21 (rs12209785, HR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.98, P = 0.014 for heterozygotes) are of particular relevance. These loci do not coincide with those that showed the strongest associations in the previous GWAS. In silico analysis strongly suggested a possible mechanistic link between these two SNPs and pancreatic cancer survival. Functional studies are warranted to confirm the link between these genes (or other genes mapping in those regions) and PDAC prognosis in order to understand whether these variants may have the potential to impact treatment decisions and design of clinical trials.

11 Article Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms within the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B region affect pancreatic cancer risk. 2016

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Gentiluomo, Manuel / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Neoptolemos, John P / Niesen, Willem / Vodicka, Pavel / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gazouli, Maria / Pacetti, Paola / Di Leo, Milena / Ito, Hidemi / Klüter, Harald / Soucek, Pavel / Corbo, Vincenzo / Yamao, Kenji / Hosono, Satoyo / Kaaks, Rudolf / Vashist, Yogesh / Gioffreda, Domenica / Strobel, Oliver / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Dijk, Frederike / Andriulli, Angelo / Ivanauskas, Audrius / Bugert, Peter / Tavano, Francesca / Vodickova, Ludmila / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Lovecek, Martin / Landi, Stefano / Key, Timothy J / Boggi, Ugo / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Mambrini, Andrea / Bambi, Franco / Busch, Olivier / Pazienza, Valerio / Valente, Roberto / Theodoropoulos, George E / Hackert, Thilo / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Pasquali, Claudio / Basso, Daniela / Sperti, Cosimo / Matsuo, Keitaro / Büchler, Markus / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Izbicki, Jakob / Costello, Eithne / Katzke, Verena / Michalski, Christoph / Stepien, Anna / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Science, Prague, Czech Republic. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Oncological Department Massa Carrara Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Carrara, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg - Hessen gGmbH, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · ARC-Net Research Centre, and Department of Diagnostics and Public Health University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery I, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Unit Nuffield Department of Population Health University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Dant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Colorectal Unit, First Department of Propaedeutic Surgery, Athens Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology-DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Laboratory of Clinical, Transplant Immunology and Genetics, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27486979.

ABSTRACT: The CDKN2A (p16) gene plays a key role in pancreatic cancer etiology. It is one of the most commonly somatically mutated genes in pancreatic cancer, rare germline mutations have been found to be associated with increased risk of developing familiar pancreatic cancer and CDKN2A promoter hyper-methylation has been suggested to play a critical role both in pancreatic cancer onset and prognosis. In addition several unrelated SNPs in the 9p21.3 region, that includes the CDNK2A, CDNK2B and the CDNK2B-AS1 genes, are associated with the development of cancer in various organs. However, association between the common genetic variability in this region and pancreatic cancer risk is not clearly understood. We sought to fill this gap in a case-control study genotyping 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2,857 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients and 6,111 controls in the context of the Pancreatic Disease Research (PANDoRA) consortium. We found that the A allele of the rs3217992 SNP was associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (ORhet=1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.27, p=0.026, ORhom=1.30, 95% CI 1.12-1.51, p=0.00049). This pleiotropic variant is reported to be a mir-SNP that, by changing the binding site of one or more miRNAs, could influence the normal cell cycle progression and in turn increase PDAC risk. In conclusion, we observed a novel association in a pleiotropic region that has been found to be of key relevance in the susceptibility to various types of cancer and diabetes suggesting that the CDKN2A/B locus could represent a genetic link between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk.

12 Article Blood expression of matrix metalloproteinases 8 and 9 and of their inducers S100A8 and S100A9 supports diagnosis and prognosis of PDAC-associated diabetes mellitus. 2016

Moz, Stefania / Basso, Daniela / Padoan, Andrea / Bozzato, Dania / Fogar, Paola / Zambon, Carlo-Federico / Pelloso, Michela / Sperti, Cosimo / Vigili de Kreutzenberg, Saula / Pasquali, Claudio / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Avogaro, Angelo / Plebani, Mario. ·Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padova, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padova, Italy. Electronic address: daniela.basso@sanita.padova.it. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgical, Oncological and GastroenterologicalSciences - DISCOG, University of Padova, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padova, Italy. · Associazione Wirsung-onlus, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padova, Italy. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padova, Italy; Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padova, Italy. ·Clin Chim Acta · Pubmed #26923392.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Based on the knowledge that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and S100A8/A9 synergistically work in causing PDAC-associated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), we verified whether tissue and blood MMP8, MMP9, S100A8 and S100A9 expression might help in distinguishing PDAC among diabetics. METHODS: Relative quantification of MMP8, MMP9, S100A8 and S100A9 mRNA was performed in tissues obtained from 8 PDAC, 4 chronic pancreatitis (ChrPa), 4 non-PDAC tumors and in PBMCs obtained from 30 controls, 43 T2DM, 41 ChrPa, 91 PDAC and 33 pancreatic-biliary tract tumors. RESULTS: T2DM was observed in PDAC (66%), in pancreatic-biliary tract tumors (64%) and in ChrPa (70%). In diabetics, with or without PDAC, MMP9 tissue expression was increased (p<0.05). Both MMPs increased in PDAC and MMP9 increased also in pancreatic-biliary tract tumors PBMCs. In diabetics, MMP9 was independently associated with PDAC (p=0.025), but failed to enhance CA 19-9 discriminant efficacy. A highly reduced S100A9 expression, found in 7 PDAC, was significantly correlated with a reduced overall survival (p=0.015). CONCLUSIONS: An increased expression of tissue and blood MMP9 reflects the presence of PDAC-associated diabetes mellitus. This finding fits with the hypothesized role of MMPs as part of the complex network linking cancer to diabetes.

13 Article Active Surveillance versus Surgery of Nonfunctioning Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms ≤2 cm in MEN1 Patients. 2016

Partelli, Stefano / Tamburrino, Domenico / Lopez, Caroline / Albers, Max / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Pasquali, Claudio / Manzoni, Marco / Toumpanakis, Christos / Fusai, Giuseppe / Bartsch, Detlef / Falconi, Massimo. ·Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, IRCCS San Raffaele Hospital, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #26731608.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of conservative treatment for nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NF-PNEN) ≤2 cm in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)-affected patients compared with surgical treatment. METHODS: The databases of 4 tertiary referral institutions (San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan; Philipps-Universität Marburg, Marburg; University of Padua, Padua; Royal Free Hospital, London) were analyzed. A comparison of conservative management and surgery at initial diagnosis of NF-PNEN ≤2 cm between 1997 and 2013 was performed. RESULTS: Overall, 27 patients (45%) underwent up-front surgery and 33 patients (55%) were followed up after the initial diagnosis. A higher proportion of patients in the surgery group were female (70 vs. 33%, p = 0.004). Patients were mainly operated on in the period 1997-2007 as compared with the period 2008-2013 (n = 17; 63 vs. 37%; p = 0.040). The rate of multifocal tumors was higher in the surgery group (n = 24; 89%) than in the 'no surgery' group (n = 22; 67%; p = 0.043). After a median follow-up of 126 months, 1 patient deceased due to postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The 5-, 10-, and 15-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 63, 39, and 10%, respectively. The median PFS was similar in the two groups. Overall, 13 patients (32.5%) were operated on after initial surgical or conservative treatment. The majority of the surgically treated patients had stage 1 (77.5%), T1 (77.5%), and G1 (85%) tumors. CONCLUSIONS: NF-PNEN ≤2 cm in MEN1 patients are indolent neoplasms posing a low oncological risk. Surgical treatment of these tumors at initial diagnosis is rarely justified in favor of conservative treatment.

14 Article Common variation at 2p13.3, 3q29, 7p13 and 17q25.1 associated with susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. 2015

Childs, Erica J / Mocci, Evelina / Campa, Daniele / Bracci, Paige M / Gallinger, Steven / Goggins, Michael / Li, Donghui / Neale, Rachel E / Olson, Sara H / Scelo, Ghislaine / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Bamlet, William R / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Canzian, Federico / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia M / Chaffee, Kari G / Chanock, Stephen J / Cleary, Sean P / Cotterchio, Michelle / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gazouli, Maria / Hassan, Manal / Herman, Joseph M / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert N / Hung, Rayjean J / Janout, Vladimir / Key, Timothy J / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Stefano / Lu, Lingeng / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Mambrini, Andrea / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Saldia, Amethyst / Scarpa, Aldo / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Strobel, Oliver / Tavano, Francesca / Vashist, Yogesh K / Vodicka, Pavel / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Petersen, Gloria M / Risch, Harvey A / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2] Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Kelvin Grove,Queensland, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. [4] Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Università Vita Salute San Raffaele and Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy. · 1] Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute and Medical Faculty Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, Section of Genetics, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Azienda USL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Liverpool Clinical Trials Unit and Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · ARC-NET-Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #26098869.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the developed world. Both inherited high-penetrance mutations in BRCA2 (ref. 2), ATM, PALB2 (ref. 4), BRCA1 (ref. 5), STK11 (ref. 6), CDKN2A and mismatch-repair genes and low-penetrance loci are associated with increased risk. To identify new risk loci, we performed a genome-wide association study on 9,925 pancreatic cancer cases and 11,569 controls, including 4,164 newly genotyped cases and 3,792 controls in 9 studies from North America, Central Europe and Australia. We identified three newly associated regions: 17q25.1 (LINC00673, rs11655237, odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-1.34, P = 1.42 × 10(-14)), 7p13 (SUGCT, rs17688601, OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.84-0.92, P = 1.41 × 10(-8)) and 3q29 (TP63, rs9854771, OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.85-0.93, P = 2.35 × 10(-8)). We detected significant association at 2p13.3 (ETAA1, rs1486134, OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09-1.19, P = 3.36 × 10(-9)), a region with previous suggestive evidence in Han Chinese. We replicated previously reported associations at 9q34.2 (ABO), 13q22.1 (KLF5), 5p15.33 (TERT and CLPTM1), 13q12.2 (PDX1), 1q32.1 (NR5A2), 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT), 16q23.1 (BCAR1) and 22q12.1 (ZNRF3). Our study identifies new loci associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

15 Article TERT gene harbors multiple variants associated with pancreatic cancer susceptibility. 2015

Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Pacetti, Paola / Vodicka, Pavel / Cleary, Sean P / Capurso, Gabriele / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Werner, Jens / Gazouli, Maria / Butterbach, Katja / Ivanauskas, Audrius / Giese, Nathalia / Petersen, Gloria M / Fogar, Paola / Wang, Zhaoming / Bassi, Claudio / Ryska, Miroslav / Theodoropoulos, George E / Kooperberg, Charles / Li, Donghui / Greenhalf, William / Pasquali, Claudio / Hackert, Thilo / Fuchs, Charles S / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Sperti, Cosimo / Funel, Niccola / Dieffenbach, Aida Karina / Wareham, Nicholas J / Buring, Julie / Holcátová, Ivana / Costello, Eithne / Zambon, Carlo-Federico / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Risch, Harvey A / Kraft, Peter / Bracci, Paige M / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Hartge, Patricia / Strobel, Oliver / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Visvanathan, Kala / Arslan, Alan A / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Souček, Pavel / Gioffreda, Domenica / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Scarpa, Aldo / Mambrini, Andrea / Jacobs, Eric J / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Klein, Alison / Tavano, Francesca / Bambi, Franco / Landi, Stefano / Austin, Melissa A / Vodickova, Ludmila / Brenner, Hermann / Chanock, Stephen J / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Piepoli, Ada / Cantore, Maurizio / Zheng, Wei / Wolpin, Brian M / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Canzian, Federico. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Basic Medical Science, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Surgical and Oncological Department, Pancreas Institute - University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Second Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Central Military Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic. · 1st Department of Propaedeutic Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology (DISCOG), University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital in Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Divisions of Preventive Medicine and Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. · Division of Epidemiology, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Environmental Medicine, and Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. · Surgical Clinic 4, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo Della Sofferenza,", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. · Department of Medicine and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #25940397.

ABSTRACT: A small number of common susceptibility loci have been identified for pancreatic cancer, one of which is marked by rs401681 in the TERT-CLPTM1L gene region on chromosome 5p15.33. Because this region is characterized by low linkage disequilibrium, we sought to identify whether additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be related to pancreatic cancer risk, independently of rs401681. We performed an in-depth analysis of genetic variability of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and the telomerase RNA component (TERC) genes, in 5,550 subjects with pancreatic cancer and 7,585 controls from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and the PanScan consortia. We identified a significant association between a variant in TERT and pancreatic cancer risk (rs2853677, odds ratio = 0.85; 95% confidence interval = 0.80-0.90, p = 8.3 × 10(-8)). Additional analysis adjusting rs2853677 for rs401681 indicated that the two SNPs are independently associated with pancreatic cancer risk, as suggested by the low linkage disequilibrium between them (r(2) = 0.07, D' = 0.28). Three additional SNPs in TERT reached statistical significance after correction for multiple testing: rs2736100 (p = 3.0 × 10(-5) ), rs4583925 (p = 4.0 × 10(-5) ) and rs2735948 (p = 5.0 × 10(-5) ). In conclusion, we confirmed that the TERT locus is associated with pancreatic cancer risk, possibly through several independent variants.

16 Article Ovarian tumors secreting insulin. 2015

Battocchio, Marialberta / Zatelli, Maria Chiara / Chiarelli, Silvia / Trento, Mariangela / Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria / Pasquali, Claudio / De Carlo, Eugenio / Dassie, Francesca / Mioni, Roberto / Rebellato, Andrea / Fallo, Francesco / Degli Uberti, Ettore / Martini, Chiara / Vettor, Roberto / Maffei, Pietro. ·Internal Medicine 3, Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Via Giustiniani 2, 35100, Padua, Italy, marialberta@hotmail.it. ·Endocrine · Pubmed #25896552.

ABSTRACT: Combined ovarian germ cell and neuroendocrine tumors are rare. Only few cases of hyperinsulinism due to ovarian ectopic secretion have been hypothesized in the literature. An ovarian tumor was diagnosed in a 76-year-old woman, referred to our department for recurrent hypoglycemia with hyperinsulinism. In vivo tests, in particular fasting test, rapid calcium infusion test, and Octreotide test were performed. Ectopic hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia was demonstrated in vivo and hypoglycemia disappeared after hysteroadnexectomy. Histological exam revealed an ovarian germ cell tumor with neuroendocrine and Yolk sac differentiation, while immunostaining showed insulin positivity in neuroendocrine cells. A cell culture was obtained by tumoral cells, testing Everolimus, and Pasireotide. Insulin was detected in cell culture medium and Everolimus and Pasireotide demonstrated their potentiality in reducing insulin secretion, more than controlling cell viability. Nine cases of hyperinsulinism due to ovarian ectopic secretion reported in literature have been reviewed. These data confirm the ovarian tissue potentiality to induce hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic syndrome after neoplastic transformation.

17 Article Imaging of pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma. 2014

Vincenzi, Matteo / Pasquotti, Giulio / Polverosi, Roberta / Pasquali, Claudio / Pomerri, Fabio. · ·Cancer Imaging · Pubmed #25609358.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To describe the main imaging characteristics of pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with particular attention to CT features, underlining possible criteria for a differential diagnosis. METHODS: 15 patients have been included in this study. 14 patients underwent multislice CT with triphasic acquisition (unenhanced, pancreatic parenchymal and portal venous phases). In 9 cases a delayed phase (120 sec) was also acquired. 5 patients underwent MRI, before and after administration of gadolinium. RESULTS: The mean time interval between nephrectomy and recurrence was 7.5 years (range 1-17 years). On CT metastases avidly enhanced in the parenchymal phase and then demonstrated a significant wash-out, approaching isodensity to the normal pancreatic parenchyma in the portal phase. In the portal phase 20 of the 25 lesions found in the arterial phase were recognizable. On non-enhanced scans, only 13 of the 25 lesions were detected. CONCLUSION: Renal Cell Carcinomas require a prolonged CT or MRI follow-up.

18 Article Pancreatic secondary lesions from renal cell carcinoma. 2014

Moletta, Lucia / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Vincenzi, Valter / Alaggio, Rita / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Pasquali, Claudio. ·4th Surgical Clinic, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. ·World J Surg · Pubmed #24962493.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Metastatic lesions to the pancreas are uncommon. The most frequent metastases are from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We analyzed the clinical features and survival of patients with pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of patients with pancreatic metastases from RCC, observed in our department from January 2004 to March 2010. Follow-up continued to September 2013. RESULTS: In the study period 13 patients with a diagnosis of metastasis from RCC were observed in our clinic, and among them 9 pancreatic resections were performed (2 pancreaticoduodenectomy, 1 duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection, 1 central pancreatectomy, and 5 distal pancreatectomy). Four patients did not undergo a pancreatic resection: two refused surgery, one had an endoscopic biliary stent for jaundice placed and then underwent a surgical biliary bypass, and the fourth patient was too advanced and had only an endoscopic biliary stent. The mean follow-up was 56 months (range 5-115, median 53), with one nonresected patient lost in follow-up after 38 months. Among the other 12 patients, 4 died: two for progression of disease 5 and 20 months respectively after our observation. The mean (±SEM) disease-free survival of seven resected patients with curative intent was 40 ± 11 months (median 34). CONCLUSIONS: Pancreatic metastases from RCC are often asymptomatic. They generally present slow growth and an indolent behavior. Surgery is the treatment of choice in those patients with only pancreatic involvement, achieving long-term survival and disease-free survival.

19 Article Treatment of malignant pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: middle-term (2-year) outcomes of a prospective observational multicentre study. 2013

Zerbi, Alessandro / Capitanio, Vanessa / Boninsegna, Letizia / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Pasquali, Claudio / Rindi, Guido / Campana, Davide / Falconi, Massimo / Anonymous1740752. ·Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Milan, Italy. ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #23472667.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Information on malignant pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs) is mostly from retrospective studies in highly selected patients. The aim of this prospective, multicentre study was to assess treatment and outcomes of malignant pNENs in clinical practice. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Consecutive patients with newly diagnosed, histologically-proven pNENs were included and followed-up for 2 years. Tumours were defined as malignant when nodal or distant metastases were present or invasion of extrapancreatic structures/organs was evident. RESULTS: A total of 140 patients with malignant pNENs were included. Ninety-eight patients (70.0%) underwent a surgical resection (76 radical and 22 palliative). Other non-surgical treatments were used in 101 patients (72.1%): somatostatin analogues (n = 63), chemotherapy (n = 30), ablative treatments (n = 15) and peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (n = 14). No relationship was observed between the 2010 WHO classification and type of treatment. A surgical resection was more often performed in incidentally detected tumours located in the pancreas body tail. Two-year progression-free survival was 63.8%: 82% after a radical resection, 44% after a palliative resection and 41% without a resection. A radical resection and Ki67 proliferative index >5% and >10% were the only significant prognostic determinants in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: A radical resection is the cornerstone treatment of malignant pNENs and represents, together with Ki67 assessment, the most powerful prognostic factor for 2-year outcomes.

20 Article Pancreatic tumors and immature immunosuppressive myeloid cells in blood and spleen: role of inhibitory co-stimulatory molecules PDL1 and CTLA4. An in vivo and in vitro study. 2013

Basso, Daniela / Fogar, Paola / Falconi, Massimo / Fadi, Elisa / Sperti, Cosimo / Frasson, Chiara / Greco, Eliana / Tamburrino, Domenico / Teolato, Sara / Moz, Stefania / Bozzato, Dania / Pelloso, Michela / Padoan, Andrea / De Franchis, Giuseppe / Gnatta, Elisa / Facco, Monica / Zambon, Carlo-Federico / Navaglia, Filippo / Pasquali, Claudio / Basso, Giuseppe / Semenzato, Gianpietro / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Pederzoli, Paolo / Plebani, Mario. ·Department of Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. daniela.basso@sanita.padova.it ·PLoS One · Pubmed #23359812.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Blood and spleen expansion of immature myeloid cells (IMCs) might compromise the immune response to cancer. We studied in vivo circulating and splenic T lymphocyte and IMC subsets in patients with benign and malignant pancreatic diseases. We ascertained in vitro whether pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC)-associated IMC subsets are induced by tumor-derived soluble factors and whether they are immunosuppressive focusing on the inhibitory co-stimulatory molecules PDL1 and CTLA4. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 103 pancreatic and/or splenic surgical patients were enrolled including 52 PDAC, 10 borderline and 10 neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Lymphocytes and IMCs were analysed by flow cytometry in blood, in spleen and in three PDAC cell conditioned (CM) or non conditioned PBMC. PDL1 and CTLA4 were studied in 30 splenic samples, in control and conditioned PBMC. IMCs were FACS sorted and co-coltured with allogenic T lymphocytes. In PDAC a reduction was found in circulating CD8(+) lymphocytes (p = 0.004) and dendritic cells (p = 0.01), which were reduced in vitro by one PDAC CM (Capan1; p = 0.03). Blood myeloid derived suppressive cells (MDSCs) CD33(+)CD14(-)HLA-DR(-) were increased in PDAC (p = 0.022) and were induced in vitro by BxPC3 CM. Splenic dendritic cells had a higher PDL1 expression (p = 0.007), while CD33(+)CD14(+)HLA-DR(-) IMCs had a lower CTLA4 expression (p = 0.029) in PDAC patients. In vitro S100A8/A9 complex, one of the possible inflammatory mediators of immune suppression in PDAC, induced PDL1 (p = 0.018) and reduced CTLA4 expression (p = 0.028) among IMCs. IMCs not expressing CTLA4 were demonstrated to be immune suppressive. CONCLUSION: In PDAC circulating dendritic and cytotoxic T cells are reduced, while MDSCs are increased and this might favour tumoral growth and progression. The reduced CTLA4 expression found among splenic IMCs of PDAC patients was demonstrated to characterize an immune suppressive phenotype and to be consequent to the direct exposure of myeloid cells to pancreatic cancer derived products, S100A8/A9 complex in particular.

21 Article Genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer and its functional characterisation: the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. 2013

Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Capurso, Gabriele / Giese, Nathalia / Funel, Niccola / Greenhalf, William / Soucek, Pavel / Gazouli, Maria / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Pasquali, Claudio / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Cantore, Maurizio / Andriulli, Angelo / Scarpa, Aldo / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Costello, Eithne / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Heller, Anette / Key, Tim J / Theodoropoulos, George / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Mambrini, Andrea / Bambi, Franco / Landi, Stefano / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Bassi, Claudio / Pacetti, Paola / Piepoli, Ada / Tavano, Francesca / di Sebastiano, Pierluigi / Vodickova, Ludmila / Basso, Daniela / Plebani, Mario / Fogar, Paola / Büchler, Markus W / Bugert, Peter / Vodicka, Pavel / Boggi, Ugo / Neoptolemos, John P / Werner, Jens / Canzian, Federico. ·German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. d.campa@dkfz.de ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #23206934.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the European Union and in the USA, but little is known about its genetic susceptibility. The PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium was established to unite the efforts of different research groups; its aim is to create a large bio-database to uncover new genetic factors for pancreatic cancer risk, response to treatment, and patient survival. So far 2220 cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, a smaller number of cases of endocrine pancreatic tumours (n=86), chronic pancreatitis (n=272) and 3847 healthy controls have been collected. As a collective effort of the consortium, SNPs associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma risk from a genome-wide association study performed in Caucasians were replicated. The possibility that the same genetic polymorphisms may influence patient survival as well was also addressed. This collective effort is particularly important for pancreatic cancer because it is a relatively rare disease for which little is known about aetiopathogenesis and risk factors. The recruitment of additional collaborators and partner institutions is continuously on-going.

22 Article Comparison of International Consensus Guidelines versus 18-FDG PET in detecting malignancy of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas. 2011

Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Sperti, Cosimo / Pasquali, Claudio / Bissoli, Sergio / Chierichetti, Franca. ·IV Surgical Clinic, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua, Padova, Italy. sergio.pedrazzoli@unipd-it ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #22076067.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To assess the reliability of the International Consensus Guidelines (ICG) and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) in distinguishing benign from malignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas. BACKGROUND: Since 2006 the ICG have been used to choose immediate surgery or surveillance for IPMN patients, but their low specificity increases the number of benign IPMNs that undergo resective surgery. PET has proved highly sensitive and specific in detecting malignancy in cystic neoplasms of the pancreas, including IPMNs. METHODS: Patients suspected with IPMNs of the pancreas seen at our Department from January 1989 to July 2010 were identified and classified as cases of main duct, mixed type and branch type IPMN. The indication for resection or surveillance was verified a posteriori for all patients according to the ICG. PET was considered positive for a Standardized Uptake Value ≥2.5. Surveillance included clinical examination, laboratory tests, CA 19-9 serum levels, and computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography every 6 months for 2 years and yearly thereafter. Endoscopic ultrasound was rarely performed. PET was repeated in clinically or radiologically suspect cases, or if tumor markers increased. RESULTS: Sixty-one main duct or mixed type and 101-branch type IPMNs were included in the study. A histological diagnosis was available for 81 of 162 patients, missing for 1 locally advanced IPMN, whereas 62 patients are under surveillance and it proved impossible to contact 18. Conservative surgery was performed in 16 of 68 patients with benign IPMNs. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and accuracy of the ICG in detecting malignancy were 93.2, 22.2, 59.4, 72.7, and 61.2, whereas for PET they were 83.3, 100, 100, 84.6, and 91.3. CONCLUSIONS: PET is more accurate than the ICG in distinguishing benign from malignant (invasive and noninvasive) IPMNs. Prophylactic IPMN resection in young patients fit for surgery should be guided by the ICG, whereas PET should be performed in older patients, cases at increased surgical risk, or when the feasibility of parenchyma-sparing surgery demands a reliable preoperative exclusion of malignancy.

23 Article Targeting protein kinase C by Enzastaurin restrains proliferation and secretion in human pancreatic endocrine tumors. 2011

Molè, Daniela / Gagliano, Teresa / Gentilin, Erica / Tagliati, Federico / Pasquali, Claudio / Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria / Pansini, Giancarlo / Degli Uberti, Ettore C / Zatelli, Maria Chiara. ·Section of Endocrinology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Advanced Therapies, University of Ferrara, Italy. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #21606156.

ABSTRACT: Dysregulation of the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathway has been implicated in tumor progression. In this study, we investigate the effects of a PKC inhibitor, Enzastaurin, in human pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNN) primary cultures and in the human pancreatic endocrine cancer cell line, BON1. To this aim six human PNN dispersed in primary cultures and BON1 cells were treated without or with 1-10 μM Enzastaurin and/or 100 nM IGF1 in the presence or absence of serum. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated after 48-72 h; Chromogranin A (CgA) and/or insulin secretion was assessed after 6 h of incubation. PKC expression was investigated by immunofluorescence and western blot. We found that Enzastaurin significantly reduced human PNN primary culture cell viability, as well as CgA and insulin secretion. Moreover, in the BON1 cell line Enzastaurin inhibited cell proliferation at 5 and 10 μM by inducing caspase-mediated apoptosis, and reduced phosphorylation of glycogen synthetase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and of Akt, both downstream targets of PKC pathway and pharmacodynamic markers for Enzastaurin. In addition, Enzastaurin blocked the stimulatory effect of IGF1 on cell proliferation, and reduced CgA expression and secretion in BON1 cells. Two different PKC isoforms are expressed at different levels and have partially different subcellular localization in BON1 cells. In conclusion, Enzastaurin reduces cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis, with a mechanism likely involving GSK3β signaling, and inhibits secretory activity in PNN in vitro models, suggesting that Enzastaurin might represent a possible medical treatment of human PNN.

24 Article Surgical treatment of pancreatic endocrine tumours in Italy: results of a prospective multicentre study of 262 cases. 2011

Zerbi, Alessandro / Capitanio, Vanessa / Boninsegna, Letizia / Pasquali, Claudio / Rindi, Guido / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Del Chiaro, Marco / Casadei, Riccardo / Falconi, Massimo / Anonymous7230672. ·Pancreatic Surgery Section, Humanitas Scientific Institute, via Manzoni 56, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. alessandro.zerbi@humanitas.it ·Langenbecks Arch Surg · Pubmed #20857140.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Information on the treatment of pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs) comes mostly from small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies. METHODS: Newly diagnosed, histologically proven PETs, observed from June 2004 to March 2007 in 24 Italian centres, were included in a specific dataset. RESULTS: Three-hundred and ten patients (mean age 57.6 years, females 46.6%) were analysed. At the time of recruitment, 262 (84.5%) underwent surgery. The percentage of operated patients was 91.9% and 62.0% in surgical and non-surgical centres, respectively. A curative resection was carried out in 83.6% (n = 219) of cases, a palliative resection (debulking) in 10.7% (n = 28), an exploratory laparotomy in 4.6% (n = 12), and a bypass procedure in 1.1% (n = 3). Laparoscopy was performed in 8.0% (n = 21) of cases. Resection consisted of a pancreatoduodenectomy in 46 cases (21.0%), a distal pancreatectomy in 95 (43.4%), an enucleation in 50 (22.8%), a middle pancreatectomy in 16 (7.3%) and a total pancreatectomy in 12 (5.5%). Liver resection was associated with pancreatic resection in 26 cases (9.9%). Post-operative mortality was 1.5% and morbidity 39.7%, respectively. A curative resection was performed more frequently in asymptomatic, small, non-metastatic, benign and at uncertain behaviour tumours, with low Ki67 values. CONCLUSIONS: This study strongly indicates the fact that surgical resection represents the cornerstone treatment of PETs.

25 Article Tumor relapse after pancreatic cancer resection is detected earlier by 18-FDG PET than by CT. 2010

Sperti, Cosimo / Pasquali, Claudio / Bissoli, Sergio / Chierichetti, Franca / Liessi, Guido / Pedrazzoli, Sergio. ·Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, IV Surgery Clinic, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #19777315.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Pancreatic cancer recurrence is often difficult to detect by conventional imaging. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the diagnosis of recurrent pancreatic cancer. METHODS: One-hundred thirty-eight patients were followed after resection for pancreatic cancer. Sixty-six underwent only CT and were excluded. Seventy-two patients also had FDG-PET. Recurrent patients were divided in two groups: group-1, CT positive and group 2, CT non diagnostic, FDG-PET positive. Characteristics and survival curves of the two groups were compared. Significance was set at p < 0.05. RESULTS: Overall, tumors recurred in 63 of 72 (87.5%) patients; two patients had a second cancer resected, thanks to FDG-PET. Tumor relapse was detected by CT in 35 patients and by FDG-PET in 61. Prognostic factors were similar in groups 1 and 2. Five out of 35 group 1 patients underwent surgery (two R0, two bypass, and one exploratory). Ten out of 28 group 2 patients underwent surgery (four R0, two R2, two bypass, and two exploratory). FDG-PET influenced treatment strategies in 32 of 72 patients (44.4%). Group 2 patients survived longer (P = 0.09), but the difference was not significant. Disease-free survival was similar in groups 1 and 2. CONCLUSION: Tumor relapse is detected earlier by FDG-PET than by CT. FDG-PET can help select the best candidates for surgical exploration, although the real benefit is still to be defined. It influences treatment strategies in a significant percentage of patients. An earlier diagnosis did not influence survival due to the lack of effective therapies.

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