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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Riccardo Panzacchi
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Riccardo Panzacchi wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review State of the art biological therapies in pancreatic cancer. 2016

Di Marco, Mariacristina / Grassi, Elisa / Durante, Sandra / Vecchiarelli, Silvia / Palloni, Andrea / Macchini, Marina / Casadei, Riccardo / Ricci, Claudio / Panzacchi, Riccardo / Santini, Donatella / Biasco, Guido. ·Mariacristina Di Marco, Elisa Grassi, Sandra Durante, Silvia Vecchiarelli, Andrea Palloni, Marina Macchini, Guido Biasco, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of Bologna, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, 40138 Bologna, Italy. ·World J Gastrointest Oncol · Pubmed #26798437.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal malignancies with a five-year survival rate of approximately 5%. Several target agents have been tested in PDAC, but almost all have failed to demonstrate efficacy in late phase clinical trials, despite the better understanding of PDAC molecular biology generated by large cancer sequencing initiatives in the past decade. Eroltinib (a small-molecule tyrosine-kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor) plus gemcitabine is the only schedule with a biological agent approved for advanced pancreatic cancer, but it has resulted in a very modest survival benefit in unselected patients. In our work, we report a summary of the main clinical trials (closed and ongoing) that refer to biological therapy evaluation in pancreatic cancer treatment.

2 Review Unusual Thyroid Carcinoma Metastases: a Case Series and Literature Review. 2016

Farina, Eleonora / Monari, Fabio / Tallini, Giovanni / Repaci, Andrea / Mazzarotto, Renzo / Giunchi, Francesca / Panzacchi, Riccardo / Cammelli, Silvia / Padula, Gilbert D A / Deodato, Francesco / Pasquali, Renato / Fanti, Stefano / Fiorentino, Michelangelo / Morganti, Alessio G. ·Radiation Oncology Center, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine-DIMES, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40135, Bologna, Italy. · Radiation Oncology Center, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine-DIMES, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40135, Bologna, Italy. rt.unibo@gmail.com. · Anatomic Pathology, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine-DIMES, Bellaria Hospital, University of Bologna, Via Altura 3, 40139, Bologna, Italy. · Division of Endocrinology, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40135, Bologna, Italy. · Radiotherapy Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata, Ospedale Civile Maggiore, Piazzale Aristide Stefani 1, Verona, Italy. · Pathology Unit of the "F. Addarii" Institute of Oncology, Department of Oncology and Hematology, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40135, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40135, Bologna, Italy. · Radiation Oncology Department, The Lacks Cancer Center, Saint Mary's Health Care, 250 Cherry St SE, Grand Rapids, MI, 49503, USA. · Radiation Oncology Unit, Fondazione "Giovanni Paolo II", Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Largo Agostino Gemelli, 1, 86100, Campobasso, Italy. · Nuclear Medicine Unit, University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40135, Bologna, Italy. ·Endocr Pathol · Pubmed #26662609.

ABSTRACT: The most common sites of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer are the neck lymph nodes, while distant metastases typically involve the lungs, the bones, and less frequently the brain. Uncommon metastatic sites include the liver, adrenal gland, kidney, pancreas, and skin. The epidemiological aspects of thyroid metastases in rare sites are largely unknown and their identification could have a significant impact on patients management. A mini-series of unusual metastatic sites of thyroid carcinoma is proposed as a contribution to current knowledge on anatomopathological characteristics and clinical outcome. Of the six cases that were assessed, the metastases were the following: skin metastases (2), skin and pancreas metastases (1), renal metastasis (1), adrenal metastasis (1), and liver metastasis (1). In our experience, metastases in rare sites do not always represent a negative prognostic factor for disease outcome. In fact they can occur as single distant lesion and if surgically resectable, their treatment can also lead to local disease remission.

3 Article Copy number gain of chromosome 3q is a recurrent event in patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) associated with disease progression. 2016

Durante, Sandra / Vecchiarelli, Silvia / Astolfi, Annalisa / Grassi, Elisa / Casadei, Riccardo / Santini, Donatella / Panzacchi, Riccardo / Ricci, Claudio / Serravalle, Salvatore / Tarantino, Giuseppe / Falconi, Mirella / Teti, Gabriella / Indio, Valentina / Pession, Andrea / Minni, Francesco / Biasco, Guido / Di Marco, Mariacristina. ·Giorgio Prodi Cancer Research Centre, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine University of Bologna, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Pathology Unit, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, "Lalla Seràgnoli" Hematology-Oncology Unit, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · DIBINEM-Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27566563.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is the most common cystic preneoplastic lesion of pancreatic cancer. We used an approach coupling high resolution cytogenetic analysis (Affymetrix Oncoscan FFPE Array) with clinically-oriented bioinformatic interpretation of data to understand the most relevant alterations of precursor lesions at different stages to identify new diagnostic markers. RESULTS: We identified multiple copy number alterations, particularly in lesions with severe dysplasia, with 7 IPMN with low-intermediate dysplasia carrying a nearly normal karyotype and 13 IPMN with complex Karyotype (> 4 alterations), showing high grade dysplasia. A specific gain of chromosome arm 3q was found in IPMN with complex Karyotype (92%). This gain of 3q is particularly interesting for the presence of oncogenes such as PIK3CA, GATA2 and TERC that are part of pathways that deregulate cell growth and promote disease progression. Quantitative PCR and FISH analysis confirmed the data . Further demonstration of the overexpression of the PIK3CA gene supports the identification of this alteration as a possible biomarker in the early identification of patients with IPMN at higher risk for disease progression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: High resolution cytogenetic analysis was performed in 20 formalin fixed paraffin embedded samples of IPMN by Oncoscan FFPE assay. Results were validated by qPCR and FISH analysis. CONCLUSIONS: The identification of these markers at an early stage of disease onset could help to identify patients at risk for cancer progression and new candidates for a more specific targeted therapy.

4 Unspecified Preoperative gemcitabine and oxaliplatin in a patient with ovarian metastasis from pancreatic cystadenocarcinoma. 2012

Di Marco, Mariacristina / Vecchiarelli, Silvia / Macchini, Marina / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Santini, Donatella / Casadei, Riccardo / Calculli, Lucia / Sina, Sokol / Panzacchi, Riccardo / Ricci, Claudio / Grassi, Elisa / Minni, Francesco / Biasco, Guido. ·Department of Hematology and Oncological Sciences 'L. & A. Seràgnoli', University of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Case Rep Gastroenterol · Pubmed #22949893.

ABSTRACT: We describe a case of clinical benefit and partial response with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin (GEMOX) in a young patient with ovarian metastasis from cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas. A young woman complained of abdominal pain and constipation. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging scans disclosed two bilateral ovarian masses with pancreatic extension. She underwent bilateral ovarian and womb resection. During surgery peritoneal carcinosis, a pancreatic mass and multiple abdominal lesions were found. The final diagnosis was mucinous pancreatic cystadenocarcinoma with ovarian and peritoneal metastases. She started chemotherapy with GEMOX (gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2)/d1 and oxaliplatin 100 mg/m(2)/d2 every 2 weeks). After 12 cycles of chemotherapy a CT scan showed reduction of the pancreatic mass. She underwent distal pancreatic resection, regional lymphadenectomy and splenectomy. Pathologic examination documented prominent fibrous tissue and few neoplastic cells with mucin-filled cytoplasm. Chemotherapy was continued with gemcitabine as adjuvant treatment for another 3 cycles. There is currently no evidence of disease. As reported in the literature, GEMOX is associated with an improvement in progression-free survival and clinical benefit in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. This is an interesting case in whom GEMOX transformed inoperable pancreatic cancer into a resectable tumor.