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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Martin Oliverius
Based on 13 articles published since 2009
(Why 13 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, M. Oliverius wrote the following 13 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Pathology of cholangiocellular carcinoma. 2019

Hrudka, Jan / Oliverius, Martin / Gürlich, Robert. · ·Cas Lek Cesk · Pubmed #31109164.

ABSTRACT: Cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) is a malignant tumor harboring a poor prognosis, occurring in the liver, gallbladder and in extra- or intrahepatic biliary ducts. The article reviews the topic concerning CCC from the point of view of a surgical pathologist. The paper deals with classification of CCC into an intrahepatic/peripheral and hilar/extrahepatic subtype with different morphology, molecular features and prognosis; together with classical gross pathology, histopathology and natural history of CCC. Hilar and extrahepatic CCC share some biological characteristics with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The review comprises various types of precancerous lesions of biliary tract, summarizes updates in 8th edition of TNM classification and describes the routine issues concerning histopathological diagnostics of CCC, including immunohistochemistry and frozen section methods.

2 Article Do pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis share the same genetic risk factors? A PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium investigation. 2018

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Capurso, Gabriele / Hackert, Thilo / Di Leo, Milena / Izbicki, Jakob R / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Gioffreda, Domenica / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Pasquali, Claudio / Macinga, Peter / Kaaks, Rudolf / Stigliano, Serena / Peeters, Petra H / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Vodicka, Pavel / Valente, Roberto / Vashist, Yogesh K / Salvia, Roberto / Papaconstantinou, Ioannis / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Valsuani, Chiara / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Gazouli, Maria / Valantiene, Irena / Niesen, Willem / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Hara, Kazuo / Soucek, Pavel / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Johnson, Theron / Brenner, Herman / Tavano, Francesca / Fogar, Paola / Ito, Hidemi / Sperti, Cosimo / Butterbach, Katja / Latiano, Anna / Andriulli, Angelo / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Busch, Olivier R C / Dijk, Frederike / Greenhalf, William / Matsuo, Keitaro / Lombardo, Carlo / Strobel, Oliver / König, Anna-Katharina / Cuk, Katarina / Strothmann, Hendrik / Katzke, Verena / Cantore, Maurizio / Mambrini, Andrea / Oliverius, Martin / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Landi, Stefano / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Sciences and Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Visceral Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Second Department of Surgery, Aretaieion Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Massa and Carrara, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Epidemiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Institute for Health Research, Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28913878.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a very aggressive tumor with a five-year survival of less than 6%. Chronic pancreatitis (CP), an inflammatory process in of the pancreas, is a strong risk factor for PDAC. Several genetic polymorphisms have been discovered as susceptibility loci for both CP and PDAC. Since CP and PDAC share a consistent number of epidemiologic risk factors, the aim of this study was to investigate whether specific CP risk loci also contribute to PDAC susceptibility. We selected five common SNPs (rs11988997, rs379742, rs10273639, rs2995271 and rs12688220) that were identified as susceptibility markers for CP and analyzed them in 2,914 PDAC cases, 356 CP cases and 5,596 controls retrospectively collected in the context of the international PANDoRA consortium. We found a weak association between the minor allele of the PRSS1-PRSS2-rs10273639 and an increased risk of developing PDAC (OR

3 Article Simultaneous occurrence of autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in patients resected for focal pancreatic mass. 2017

Macinga, Peter / Pulkertova, Adela / Bajer, Lukas / Maluskova, Jana / Oliverius, Martin / Smejkal, Martin / Heczkova, Maria / Spicak, Julius / Hucl, Tomas. ·Peter Macinga, Adela Pulkertova, Lukas Bajer, Julius Spicak, Tomas Hucl, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague 140 21, Czech Republic. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28405146.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To assess the occurrence of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) in pancreatic resections performed for focal pancreatic enlargement. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of medical records of all patients who underwent pancreatic resection for a focal pancreatic enlargement at our tertiary center from January 2000 to July 2013. The indication for surgery was suspicion of a tumor based on clinical presentation, imaging findings and laboratory evaluations. The diagnosis of AIP was based on histology findings. An experienced pathologist specialized in pancreatic disease reviewed all the cases and confirmed the diagnosis in pancreatic resection specimens suggestive of AIP. The histological diagnosis of AIP was set according to the international consensus diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: Two hundred ninety-five pancreatic resections were performed in 201 men and 94 women. AIP was diagnosed in 15 patients (5.1%, 12 men and 3 women) based on histology of the resected specimen. Six of them had AIP type 1, nine were diagnosed with AIP type 2. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) was also present in six patients with AIP (40%), all six were men. Patients with AIP + PC were significantly older (60.5 CONCLUSION: The possible co-occurrence of PC and AIP suggests that preoperative diagnosis of AIP does not rule out simultaneous presence of PC.

4 Article SLC22A3 polymorphisms do not modify pancreatic cancer risk, but may influence overall patient survival. 2017

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Strouhal, Ondrej / Hughes, David J / Holcatova, Ivana / Oliverius, Martin / Kala, Zdenek / Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Sperti, Cosimo / Federico Zambon, Carlo / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Fogar, Paola / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Capurso, Gabriele / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Valente, Roberto / Gazouli, Maria / Malleo, Giuseppe / Teresa Lawlor, Rita / Strobel, Oliver / Hackert, Thilo / Giese, Nathalia / Vodicka, Pavel / Vodickova, Ludmila / Landi, Stefano / Tavano, Francesca / Gioffreda, Domenica / Piepoli, Ada / Pazienza, Valerio / Mambrini, Andrea / Pedata, Mariangela / Cantore, Maurizio / Bambi, Franco / Ermini, Stefano / Funel, Niccola / Lemstrova, Radmila / Soucek, Pavel. ·Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Physiology &Centre for Systems Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Transplantation Surgery, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, The University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Brno Bohunice, Czech Republic. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Digestive Diseases, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Italy. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Italy. · Clinica Chirurgica 4, University of Padova, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · ARC-NET Applied research on Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic and First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. · Biomedical Centre, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Azienda USL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Blood Transfusion Service, Children's Hospital Meyer, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria, Florence, Italy. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #28272475.

ABSTRACT: Expression of the solute carrier (SLC) transporter SLC22A3 gene is associated with overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients. This study tested whether genetic variability in SLC22A3 associates with pancreatic cancer risk and prognosis. Twenty four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the SLC22A3 gene sequence and regulatory elements were selected for analysis. Of these, 22 were successfully evaluated in the discovery phase while six significant or suggestive variants entered the validation phase, comprising a total study number of 1,518 cases and 3,908 controls. In the discovery phase, rs2504938, rs9364554, and rs2457571 SNPs were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Moreover, rs7758229 associated with the presence of distant metastases, while rs512077 and rs2504956 correlated with overall survival of patients. Although replicated, the association for rs9364554 did not pass multiple testing corrections in the validation phase. Contrary to the discovery stage, rs2504938 associated with survival in the validation cohort, which was more pronounced in stage IV patients. In conclusion, common variation in the SLC22A3 gene is unlikely to significantly contribute to pancreatic cancer risk. The rs2504938 SNP in SLC22A3 significantly associates with an unfavorable prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients. Further investigation of this SNP effect on the molecular and clinical phenotype is warranted.

5 Article Hedgehog pathway overexpression in pancreatic cancer is abrogated by new-generation taxoid SB-T-1216. 2017

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, B / Kocik, M / Duchonova, B / Brynychova, V / Oliverius, M / Hlavsa, J / Honsova, E / Mazanec, J / Kala, Z / Ojima, I / Hughes, D J / Doherty, J E / Murray, H A / Crockard, M A / Lemstrova, R / Soucek, P. ·Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Transplantation Surgery, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital and Medical Faculty, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · Department of Clinical and Transplantation Pathology, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Pathology, University Hospital and Medical Faculty, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · Institute of Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, USA. · Department of Physiology &Centre for Systems Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland. · Randox Laboratories, Crumlin, UK. ·Pharmacogenomics J · Pubmed #27573236.

ABSTRACT: The Hedgehog pathway is one of the major driver pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. This study investigated prognostic importance of Hedgehog signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer patients who underwent a radical resection. Tumors and adjacent non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues were obtained from 45 patients with histologically verified pancreatic cancer. The effect of experimental taxane chemotherapy on the expression of Hedgehog pathway was evaluated in vivo using a mouse xenograft model prepared using pancreatic cancer cell line Paca-44. Mice were treated by experimental Stony Brook Taxane SB-T-1216. The transcript profile of 34 Hedgehog pathway genes in patients and xenografts was assessed using quantitative PCR. The Hedgehog pathway was strongly overexpressed in pancreatic tumors and upregulation of SHH, IHH, HHAT and PTCH1 was associated with a trend toward decreased patient survival. No association of Hedgehog pathway expression with KRAS mutation status was found in tumors. Sonic hedgehog ligand was overexpressed, but all other downstream genes were downregulated by SB-T-1216 treatment in vivo. Suppression of HH pathway expression in vivo by taxane-based chemotherapy suggests a new mechanism of action for treatment of this aggressive tumor.

6 Article Association of genetic polymorphisms with survival of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. 2016

Rizzato, Cosmeri / Campa, Daniele / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Halloran, Christopher / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Butturini, Giovanni / Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice / Sperti, Cosimo / Tjaden, Christine / Ghaneh, Paula / Hackert, Thilo / Funel, Niccola / Giese, Nathalia / Tavano, Francesca / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Pedata, Mariangela / Pasquali, Claudio / Gazouli, Maria / Mambrini, Andrea / Souček, Pavel / di Sebastiano, Pierluigi / Capurso, Gabriele / Cantore, Maurizio / Oliverius, Martin / Offringa, Rienk / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Strobel, Oliver / Scarpa, Aldo / Canzian, Federico. ·Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery and. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łódź, Łódź, Poland. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, NIHR Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Unit of Surgery B, The Pancreas Institute, Department of Surgery and Oncology, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery and. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", S. Giovanni Rotondo (FG), Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Disease, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Oncological Department, ASL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Science, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo (FG), Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Molecular Oncology of Gastrointestinal Tumors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany and. · ARC-NET, Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, f.canzian@dkfz.de. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #27497070.

ABSTRACT: Germline genetic variability might contribute, at least partially, to the survival of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Two recently performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on PDAC overall survival (OS) suggested (P < 10(-5)) the association between 30 genomic regions and PDAC OS. With the aim to highlight the true associations within these regions, we analyzed 44 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 30 candidate regions in 1722 PDAC patients within the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. We observed statistically significant associations for five of the selected regions. One association in the CTNNA2 gene on chromosome 2p12 [rs1567532, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-2.58, P = 0.005 for homozygotes for the minor allele] and one in the last intron of the RUNX2 gene on chromosome 6p21 (rs12209785, HR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.98, P = 0.014 for heterozygotes) are of particular relevance. These loci do not coincide with those that showed the strongest associations in the previous GWAS. In silico analysis strongly suggested a possible mechanistic link between these two SNPs and pancreatic cancer survival. Functional studies are warranted to confirm the link between these genes (or other genes mapping in those regions) and PDAC prognosis in order to understand whether these variants may have the potential to impact treatment decisions and design of clinical trials.

7 Article Pancreatic islet autotransplantation after completion pancreatectomy for pancreatic fistula after hemipancreatoduodenectomy for carcinoma. 2014

Kocik, M / Lipar, K / Saudek, F / Girman, P / Boucek, P / Kucera, M / Fronek, J / Oliverius, M. ·Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. Electronic address: matej.kocik@ikem.cz. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Diabetes, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. ·Transplant Proc · Pubmed #25131092.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Pancreatic islet autotransplantation (IAT) has a potential to prevent brittle diabetes in patients after total pancreatectomy. Because of the fear of tumor spread, IAT has rarely been used in case of malignancy. We report our experience with patients who underwent hemipancreatoduodenectomy for carcinoma and later completion pancreatectomy for pancreatic fistula with islet autotransplantation at our institution. METHODS: From August 2007 to December 2012, 5 patients underwent IAT after completion pancreatectomy for pancreatic fistula after hemipancreatoduodenectomy for carcinoma. Islets were isolated from the pancreatic tail with the use of digestion with collagenase. Nonpurified islet suspension was infused into the portal vein during surgery. RESULTS: The median number of islets transplanted was 175,000 islet equivalents (range, 70,000-365,000). One patient died after surgery for reasons unrelated to IAT. Another 3 patients had stable diabetes with partial graft function (fasting C-peptide levels 0.23, 0.41, and 0.61 nmol/L and HbA1c 4.8%, 4.6%, and 6.9% at 24, 24 and 9 months after IAT, respectively). The 1st patient, with pancreatic head carcinoma, was alive 28 months after IAT with lymph node and liver recurrence since 18 months after IAT. The 2nd patient, with gall bladder and distal bile duct carcinoma, died 47 months after IAT with tumor recurrence. The 3rd patient, with ampullary carcinoma, died 12 months after IAT with local recurrence and solitary liver metastasis. The last patient had been off insulin 9 months after IAT without tumor recurrence (fasting C-peptide, 0.89 nmol/L; HbA1c, 4.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Autotransplantation of pancreatic islets isolated from the residual pancreatic tissue in patients who previously underwent hemipancreatoduodenectomy for cancer may provide stable glucose control and thus improve quality of life. In this small series we did not observe early development of multiple liver metastases caused by islet suspension contamination with malignant cells. Oncologic outcome of the patients was not worse than what would be expected without IAT.

8 Article The association between the expression of solute carrier transporters and the prognosis of pancreatic cancer. 2013

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Brynychova, Veronika / Hlavac, Viktor / Kocik, Matej / Oliverius, Martin / Hlavsa, Jan / Honsova, Eva / Mazanec, Jan / Kala, Zdenek / Melichar, Bohuslav / Soucek, Pavel. ·Toxicogenomics Unit, National Institute of Public Health, Srobarova 48, Prague 10, Czech Republic. D.Beatrice@seznam.cz ·Cancer Chemother Pharmacol · Pubmed #23934321.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of fourteen anticancer drug-relevant solute carrier transporters (SLCs) in pancreatic cancer in the context of clinical-pathological characteristics and the KRAS mutation status of tumors. METHODS: Tumors and non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues were obtained from 32 histologically verified patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The transcript profile of SLCs was assessed using quantitative real-time PCR. KRAS mutations in exon 2 were assessed by high-resolution melting analysis and confirmed by sequencing. RESULTS: SLC22A3 and SLC22A18 were upregulated and SLC22A1, SLC22A2, SLC22A11, SLC28A1, SLC28A3 and SLC29A1 were downregulated when compared with non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues. Moreover, significantly lower levels of SLC22A1, SLC22A11 and SLC29A1 were found in tumors with angioinvasion. There was also a significantly higher transcript level of SLC28A1 in tumors with regional lymph nodes affected by metastasis. The study found that a high expression of SLC28A1 was significantly associated with poor overall survival in unselected patients. In contrast, a high expression of SLC22A3 or SLC29A3 was significantly associated with longer overall survival in patients treated with nucleoside analogs. Protein expression of SLC22A1, SLC22A3 and SLC29A3 in tumor tissues of patients with pancreatic carcinoma was observed by immunoblotting for the first time. Finally, SLC levels were not found to be associated with KRAS mutation status in exon 2. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified a number of associations of transcript levels of SLCs with prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients.

9 Article Differences in transcript levels of ABC transporters between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and nonneoplastic tissues. 2013

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Brynychova, Veronika / Oliverius, Martin / Honsova, Eva / Kala, Zdenek / Muckova, Katarina / Soucek, Pavel. ·Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. mohelnikova@szu.cz ·Pancreas · Pubmed #23462326.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate transcript levels of all 49 human ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABCs) in one of the most drug-resistant cancers, namely, the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Association of ABCs levels with clinical-pathologic characteristics and KRAS mutation status was followed as well. METHODS: Tumors and adjacent nonneoplastic tissues were obtained from 32 histologically verified PDAC patients. The transcript profile of ABCs was assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction with a relative standard curve. KRAS mutations in exon 2 were assessed by high-resolution melting analysis and sequencing. RESULTS: Most ABCs were deregulated in PDAC and 10 ABCs were associated with clinical-pathologic characteristics. KRAS mutations did not change the global expression profile of ABCs. CONCLUSIONS: The expression of ABC transporters was significantly deregulated in PDAC tumors when compared to nonmalignant tissues. The observed up-regulation of ABCB4, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC3, ABCC5, ABCC10, and ABCG2 in tumors may contribute to the generally poor treatment response of PDAC. The up-regulation of ABCA1, ABCA7, and ABCG1 implicates a serious impairment of cellular cholesterol homeostasis in PDAC. On the other hand, the observed down-regulation of ABCA3, ABCC6, ABCC7, and ABCC8 suggests a possible role of stem cells in the development and progression of PDAC.

10 Article Evaluation of reference genes and normalization strategy for quantitative real-time PCR in human pancreatic carcinoma. 2012

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Oliverius, Martin / Honsova, Eva / Soucek, Pavel. ·Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. ·Dis Markers · Pubmed #22377737.

ABSTRACT: Histologically verified pairs (n=10) of pancreatic tumors and non-neoplastic tissues were used for quantitative real-time PCR and the stability of 24 reference genes was analyzed with geNorm and NormFinder software. Raw C{q} values correlated with the degree of RNA degradation. This correlation was abolished by normalization to C{q} of 18S endogenous control gene. Both geNorm and NormFinder programs suggested EIF2B1, ELF1, MRPL19, and POP4 as the same most stable genes. We have thus identified suitable reference genes for future expression studies in pancreatic carcinoma. Normalization method reducing the effects of RNA degradation on the quality of results was also developed.

11 Article Radical surgery for pancreatic malignancy in the elderly. 2010

Oliverius, M / Kala, Z / Varga, M / Gürlich, R / Lanska, V / Kubesova, H. ·Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. maol@medicon.cz ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #20720452.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Improving life expectancy is associated with increasing incidence of pancreatic cancer. We reviewed morbidity and mortality in patients aged 65 years and older undergoing curative intent surgery in two centers in the Czech Republic. METHODS: Data were retrieved by retrospective analysis of the medical records over the period 2000-2007. In total, 60 patients were included. The mean age was 71 years (median 70 years; range 65-85 years). Most patients (43, 72%) underwent hemipancreatoduodenectomy, combined in 4 with portomesenterial vessel resection. Twelve patients (20%) had distal pancreatectomy and 5 patients (8%) total pancreatectomy. RESULTS: Overall morbidity was 28%. Only 10 patients (18%) developed serious surgical complications in terms of pancreatic leak (5, 8%), biliary leak (2, 3%), and intra-abdominal inflammatory collection (4, 7%). Four patients (6.6%) died within 30 days. The 1-year survival was 62.8%. CONCLUSION: We can conclude that age per se is not a contraindication to surgery. Patient's overall general condition, co-existing co-morbidities, and ability to get over with any potential complications are more important. and IAP.

12 Article [Pancreatic resection for metastatic renal cell carcinoma]. 2009

Varga, M / Oliverius, M / Valsamis, A / Kucera, M / Gürlich, R / Safanda, M / Matia, I / Honsová, E. ·Klinika transplantacní chirurgie, Institut klinické a experimentální medicíny, Praha. mavg@ikem.cz ·Klin Onkol · Pubmed #20099748.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUNDS: Late metastases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are quite common. However, metastases in the pancreas are rare. Between 2004-2008 the Department of transplantation surgery of the institute of clinical and experimental medicine performed 87 pancreatic resections for tumour. From this, metastasis of RCC was histologically verified in four cases.The aim of this study was to summarize in the form of brief case reports our experience with the surgical treatment of pancreatic metastasis of RCC. OBSERVATION: The interval from nephrectomy to the occurrence of pancreatic metastasis was 10, 11, 15 and 16 years. All patients were examined to exclude metastatic generalization. Surgical treatment was: one total pancreatectomy, two subtotal pancreatectomies and one caudal resection. Two patients had solitary pancreatic metastasis, one had two metastases and one had multiple metastatic lesions. No complications were observed in the postoperative period. All patients are living with survival time of 7, 23, 26 and 52 months. None of them has signs of recurrence of the primary disease. CONCLUSION: The follow up in patients with a history of RCC should be lifelong. Considering the low response of RCC and its metastases to oncological treatment, pancreatic resection is a safe method with a low rate of complications in patients with RCC metastases limited only to the pancreas and detected in time.

13 Article [One-year survival outcomes in patients with pancreatic head and portomesenteric veins resection]. 2009

Gürlich, R / Oliverius, M / Lipár, K / Varga, M / Spicák, J / Stirand, P / Valsamis, A / Novotný, J / Vyhnánek, F. ·Chirurgická klinika 3. LF UK a FNKV, Praha. gurlich@fnkv.cz ·Rozhl Chir · Pubmed #20055293.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Hemipancreatoduodenectomy is a standard technique for surgical management of pancreatic head carcinomas. However, so far, mesenteric and/or portal vein resections have not been commonly indicated. This original report presents one-year survival outcomes in a group of operated subjects. METHODOLOGY: From 7/2005 to 7/2008, 13 pancreatic resections with concomitant resection of the mesenteric or portal vein were performed in the IKEM Transplant Surgery Clinic. The study objective was to assess the perioperative complications and 30-day mortality rates, and the overall survival period. RESULTS: The study group included 13 patients, 8 males and 5 females, the mean age was 66 (48 to 85) years. Concomitantly, resection of the portal vein (6x) or the superior mesenteric vein (3x), or of the both veins (4x) was performed. In 11 subjects of this patient group, the time period between the surgical procedure and the assessment was over a year. During the portomesenteric reconstruction phase, end-to-end anastomoses were performed in eight subjects, and the resected vein was replaced with the internal jugular vein in two subjects. In three subjects, the venous wall excision site was closed using a simple defect suture. Out of the study group, 5 subjects were surviving at 12 months. Three patients exited due to their primary diagnosis and the fourth one for internal complications two months after the procedure. CONCLUSION: The authors belive that hemipancreatoduodenectomy with concomitant resection of portomesenteric veins should become a standard treatment method in indicated patients, performed in specialized centres.