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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Karin A. Oien
Based on 18 articles published since 2010
(Why 18 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Karin Oien wrote the following 18 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Clinical potential of microRNAs in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2011

Steele, Colin W / Oien, Karin A / McKay, Colin J / Jamieson, Nigel B. ·Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Glasgow, UK. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #22001830.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Aggressive invasion and early metastases are characteristic features of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). More than 90% of patients have surgically nonresectable disease at presentation. Despite increasing knowledge of the genetics of this complex disease, systemic therapies, particularly gemcitabine, have modest clinical benefit and marginal survival advantage. MicroRNAs have been shown to have a role in oncogenesis, invasion, and metastases via epigenetic posttranscriptional gene regulation. Our objective was to discuss the clinical impact of microRNAs within PDAC. METHODS: This review details the understanding of microRNAs to date and explores the clinical utility of microRNAs in PDAC. RESULTS: Recent studies have focused on the impact of microRNA expression in PDAC, many of which have shown the diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic utility of microRNA profiling in PDAC identifying numerous potential targets including miR-21, miR-196a, and miR-217. CONCLUSIONS: MicroRNA stability in body fluid and tissue samples makes this area one of the most promising for earlier detection of PDAC. Indeed, microRNAs may in the future serve as a long-awaited screening tool for PDAC. Furthermore, microRNA expression profiling in PDAC may be incorporated into modern treatment algorithms to enhance therapeutic management. Equally as exciting is the potential for novel therapeutics directed against these important disease mediators.

2 Review Tissue biomarkers for prognosis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2011

Jamieson, Nigel B / Carter, C Ross / McKay, Colin J / Oien, Karin A. ·West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit and Department of Pathology, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, United Kingdom. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #21444679.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The management of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) continues to present a great challenge particularly with regard to prediction of outcome following pancreaticoduodenectomy. Molecular markers have been extensively investigated by numerous groups with the aim of enhancing prognostication; however, despite hundreds of studies that have sought to assess the potential prognostic value of molecular markers in predicting the clinical course following resection of PDAC, at this time, no molecular marker assay forms part of recommended clinical practice. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the published literature for immunohistochemistry-based biomarkers of PDAC outcome. A dual search strategy was applied to the PubMed database on January 6, 2010, to identify cohort studies that reported associations between immunohistochemical biomarker expression and survival outcomes in PDAC, and conformed to the REMARK (REporting recommendations for tumor MARKer prognostic studies) criteria. RESULTS: A total of 103 distinct proteins met all inclusion criteria. Promising markers that emerged for the prediction of overall survival included BAX (HR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.71-0.56), Bcl-2 (HR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.27-0.63), survivin (HR = 0.46, 95% CI: 0.29-0.73), Ki-67: (HR = 2.42, 95% CI: 1.87-3.14), COX-2 (HR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.13-1.71), E-cadherin (HR = 1.80, 95% CI: 1.33-2.42), and S100 calcium-binding proteins, in particular S100A2 (HR = 3.23, 95% CI: 1.58-6.62). CONCLUSIONS: We noted that that there was incomplete adherence to the REMARK guidelines with inadequate methodology reporting as well as failure to perform multivariate analysis. Addressing the persistent incomplete adoption of these criteria may eventually result in the incorporation of molecular marker assessment within PDAC management algorithms.

3 Article Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Humphris, Jeremy L / Patch, Ann-Marie / Nones, Katia / Bailey, Peter J / Johns, Amber L / McKay, Skye / Chang, David K / Miller, David K / Pajic, Marina / Kassahn, Karin S / Quinn, Michael C J / Bruxner, Timothy J C / Christ, Angelika N / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Manning, Suzanne / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Stone, Andrew / Wilson, Peter J / Anderson, Matthew / Fink, J Lynn / Holmes, Oliver / Kazakoff, Stephen / Leonard, Conrad / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Wood, Scott / Mead, Ronald S / Xu, Qinying / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark J / Jones, Marc D / Nagrial, Adnan M / Chin, Venessa T / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Chou, Angela / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia V / Rooman, Ilse / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher W / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Jamieson, Nigel B / McKay, Colin J / Carter, C Ross / Dickson, Euan J / Graham, Janet S / Duthie, Fraser / Oien, Karin / Hair, Jane / Morton, Jennifer P / Sansom, Owen J / Grützmann, Robert / Hruban, Ralph H / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Schulick, Richard D / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Rusev, Borislav / Corbo, Vincenzo / Salvia, Roberto / Cataldo, Ivana / Tortora, Giampaolo / Tempero, Margaret A / Anonymous5070887 / Hofmann, Oliver / Eshleman, James R / Pilarsky, Christian / Scarpa, Aldo / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Gill, Anthony J / Pearson, John V / Grimmond, Sean M / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Genetic and Molecular Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Eastern Area Laboratory Services Pathology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia; Sonic Genetics, Douglass Hanly Moir Pathology, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, SydPath, St Vincent's Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Murdoch, Washington. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woollongabba, Queensland, Australia. · School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Australia and St John of God Pathology, Subiaco, Washington. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow & Clyde National Health Service, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Greater Glasgow and Clyde Bio-repository, Pathology Department, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Institute for Cancer Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · ARC-NET Center for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy; Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Medicine, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California. · Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Department of Surgery, University of Erlangen-Nueremberg, Germany. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; University of Melbourne Centre for Cancer Research, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: nic.waddell@qimrberghofer.edu.au. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. Electronic address: andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #27856273.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

4 Article Investigating Various Thresholds as Immunohistochemistry Cutoffs for Observer Agreement. 2017

Ali, Asif / Bell, Sarah / Bilsland, Alan / Slavin, Jill / Lynch, Victoria / Elgoweini, Maha / Derakhshan, Mohammad H / Jamieson, Nigel B / Chang, David / Brown, Victoria / Denley, Simon / Orange, Clare / McKay, Colin / Carter, Ross / Oien, Karin A / Duthie, Fraser R. ·*Institute of Cancer Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow §Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Western Infirmary ¶Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary ‡Department of Pathology, Laboratory Medicine Building, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Greater Glasgow & Clyde NHS ∥West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit and Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow #Pathology Laboratory, Forth Valley Royal Hospital, Larbert, UK †Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Khyber Medical University, Peshawar, Pakistan. ·Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol · Pubmed #27093449.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Clinical translation of immunohistochemistry (IHC) biomarkers requires reliable and reproducible cutoffs or thresholds for interpretation of immunostaining. Most IHC biomarker research focuses on the clinical relevance (diagnostic, prognostic, or predictive utility) of cutoffs, with less emphasis on observer agreement using these cutoffs. From the literature, we identified 3 commonly used cutoffs of 10% positive epithelial cells, 20% positive epithelial cells, and moderate to strong staining intensity (+2/+3 hereafter) to use for investigating observer agreement. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A series of 36 images of microarray cores stained for 4 different IHC biomarkers, with variable staining intensity and percentage of positive cells, was used for investigating interobserver and intraobserver agreement. Seven pathologists scored the immunostaining in each image using the 3 cutoffs for positive and negative staining. Kappa (κ) statistic was used to assess the strength of agreement for each cutoff. RESULTS: The interobserver agreement between all 7 pathologists using the 3 cutoffs was reasonably good, with mean κ scores of 0.64, 0.59, and 0.62, respectively, for 10%, 20%, and +2/+3 cutoffs. A good agreement was observed for experienced pathologists using the 10% cutoff, and their agreement was statistically higher than for junior pathologists (P=0.02). In addition, the mean intraobserver agreement for all 7 pathologists using the 3 cutoffs was reasonably good, with mean κ scores of 0.71, 0.60, and 0.73, respectively, for 10%, 20%, and +2/+3 cutoffs. For all 3 cutoffs, a positive correlation was observed with perceived ease of interpretation (P<0.003). Finally, cytoplasmic-only staining achieved higher agreement using all 3 cutoffs than mixed staining patterns. CONCLUSIONS: All 3 cutoffs investigated achieve reasonable strength of agreement, modestly decreasing interobserver and intraobserver variability in IHC interpretation. These cutoffs have previously been used in cancer pathology, and this study provides evidence that these cutoffs can be reproducible between practicing pathologists.

5 Article Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer. 2016

Bailey, Peter / Chang, David K / Nones, Katia / Johns, Amber L / Patch, Ann-Marie / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Miller, David K / Christ, Angelika N / Bruxner, Tim J C / Quinn, Michael C / Nourse, Craig / Murtaugh, L Charles / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Manning, Suzanne / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Wani, Shivangi / Fink, Lynn / Holmes, Oliver / Chin, Venessa / Anderson, Matthew J / Kazakoff, Stephen / Leonard, Conrad / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Wilson, Peter J / Cloonan, Nicole / Kassahn, Karin S / Taylor, Darrin / Quek, Kelly / Robertson, Alan / Pantano, Lorena / Mincarelli, Laura / Sanchez, Luis N / Evers, Lisa / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark J / Jones, Marc D / Colvin, Emily K / Nagrial, Adnan M / Humphrey, Emily S / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Humphris, Jeremy / Chou, Angela / Pajic, Marina / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia V / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Rooman, Ilse / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Lovell, Jessica A / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher W / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Moran-Jones, Kim / Jamieson, Nigel B / Graham, Janet S / Duthie, Fraser / Oien, Karin / Hair, Jane / Grützmann, Robert / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Corbo, Vincenzo / Bassi, Claudio / Rusev, Borislav / Capelli, Paola / Salvia, Roberto / Tortora, Giampaolo / Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata / Petersen, Gloria M / Anonymous2640859 / Munzy, Donna M / Fisher, William E / Karim, Saadia A / Eshleman, James R / Hruban, Ralph H / Pilarsky, Christian / Morton, Jennifer P / Sansom, Owen J / Scarpa, Aldo / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo / Hofmann, Oliver / Sutherland, Robert L / Wheeler, David A / Gill, Anthony J / Gibbs, Richard A / Pearson, John V / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M. ·Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia. · South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland 4006, Australia. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Michael DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Pathology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · Harvard Chan Bioinformatics Core, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. · Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, New South Wales 2560, Australia. · Department of Pathology. SydPath, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. · St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2052, Australia. · School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia. · University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown New South Wales 2050, Australia. · School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. · Fiona Stanley Hospital, Robin Warren Drive, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. · School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Nedlands 6009, Australia and St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN, UK. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow &Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. · GGC Bio-repository, Pathology Department, Southern General Hospital, 1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TY, UK. · Department of Surgery, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany. · Departments of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Texas 77030, USA. · The David M. Rubenstein Pancreatic Cancer Research Center and Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · ARC-Net Applied Research on Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. · Elkins Pancreas Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS226, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · Institute for Cancer Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK. · University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia. ·Nature · Pubmed #26909576.

ABSTRACT: Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development.

6 Article Ampullary Cancers Harbor ELF3 Tumor Suppressor Gene Mutations and Exhibit Frequent WNT Dysregulation. 2016

Gingras, Marie-Claude / Covington, Kyle R / Chang, David K / Donehower, Lawrence A / Gill, Anthony J / Ittmann, Michael M / Creighton, Chad J / Johns, Amber L / Shinbrot, Eve / Dewal, Ninad / Fisher, William E / Anonymous400856 / Pilarsky, Christian / Grützmann, Robert / Overman, Michael J / Jamieson, Nigel B / Van Buren, George / Drummond, Jennifer / Walker, Kimberly / Hampton, Oliver A / Xi, Liu / Muzny, Donna M / Doddapaneni, Harsha / Lee, Sandra L / Bellair, Michelle / Hu, Jianhong / Han, Yi / Dinh, Huyen H / Dahdouli, Mike / Samra, Jaswinder S / Bailey, Peter / Waddell, Nicola / Pearson, John V / Harliwong, Ivon / Wang, Huamin / Aust, Daniela / Oien, Karin A / Hruban, Ralph H / Hodges, Sally E / McElhany, Amy / Saengboonmee, Charupong / Duthie, Fraser R / Grimmond, Sean M / Biankin, Andrew V / Wheeler, David A / Gibbs, Richard A. ·Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Michael DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: mgingras@bcm.edu. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute for Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK; The Kinghorn Cancer Centre and the Cancer Research Program Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, NSW 2170, Australia. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre and the Cancer Research Program Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW 2065, Australia; Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. · Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Michael E. DeBakey Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre and the Cancer Research Program Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. · Michael DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; The Elkins Pancreas Center at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Surgery, TU Dresden, 01307 Dresden, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, 91054 Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute for Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK; Academic Unit of Surgery, Institute of Cancer Sciences, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Level 2, New Lister Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW 2065, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute for Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia; QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Brisbane, QLD 4006, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia. · Department of Pathology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Pathology, TU Dresden, 01307 Dresden, Germany. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute for Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK; Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow and Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA. · Michael DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; The Elkins Pancreas Center at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Biochemistry and Liver Fluke and Cholangiocarcinoma Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute for Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: wheeler@bcm.edu. ·Cell Rep · Pubmed #26804919.

ABSTRACT: The ampulla of Vater is a complex cellular environment from which adenocarcinomas arise to form a group of histopathologically heterogenous tumors. To evaluate the molecular features of these tumors, 98 ampullary adenocarcinomas were evaluated and compared to 44 distal bile duct and 18 duodenal adenocarcinomas. Genomic analyses revealed mutations in the WNT signaling pathway among half of the patients and in all three adenocarcinomas irrespective of their origin and histological morphology. These tumors were characterized by a high frequency of inactivating mutations of ELF3, a high rate of microsatellite instability, and common focal deletions and amplifications, suggesting common attributes in the molecular pathogenesis are at play in these tumors. The high frequency of WNT pathway activating mutation, coupled with small-molecule inhibitors of β-catenin in clinical trials, suggests future treatment decisions for these patients may be guided by genomic analysis.

7 Article SIRT3 & SIRT7: Potential Novel Biomarkers for Determining Outcome in Pancreatic Cancer Patients. 2015

McGlynn, Liane M / McCluney, Simon / Jamieson, Nigel B / Thomson, Jackie / MacDonald, Alasdair I / Oien, Karin / Dickson, Euan J / Carter, C Ross / McKay, Colin J / Shiels, Paul G. ·Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Academic Department of Surgery, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Institute of Cancer Sciences, Pathology, Wolfson Building, Beatson Labs, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #26121130.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The sirtuin gene family has been linked with tumourigenesis, in both a tumour promoter and suppressor capacity. Information regarding the function of sirtuins in pancreatic cancer is sparse and equivocal. We undertook a novel study investigating SIRT1-7 protein expression in a cohort of pancreatic tumours. The aim of this study was to establish a protein expression profile for SIRT1-7 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) and to determine if there were associations between SIRT1-7 expression, clinico-pathological parameters and patient outcome. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis of SIRT1-7 protein levels was undertaken in a tissue micro-array comprising 77 resected PDACs. Statistical analyses determined if SIRT1-7 protein expression was associated with clinical parameters or outcome. RESULTS: Two sirtuin family members demonstrated significant associations with clinico-pathological parameters and patient outcome. Low level SIRT3 expression in the tumour cytoplasm correlated with more aggressive tumours, and a shorter time to relapse and death, in the absence of chemotherapeutic intervention. Low levels of nuclear SIRT7 expression were also associated with an aggressive tumour phenotype and poorer outcome, as measured by disease-free and disease-specific survival time, 12 months post-diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggests that SIRT3 and SIRT7 possess tumour suppressor properties in the context of pancreatic cancer. SIRT3 may also represent a novel predictive biomarker to determine which patients may or may not respond to chemotherapy. This study opens up an interesting avenue of investigation to potentially identify predictive biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer, a disease that has seen no significant improvement in survival over the past 40 years.

8 Article Targeting the LOX/hypoxia axis reverses many of the features that make pancreatic cancer deadly: inhibition of LOX abrogates metastasis and enhances drug efficacy. 2015

Miller, Bryan W / Morton, Jennifer P / Pinese, Mark / Saturno, Grazia / Jamieson, Nigel B / McGhee, Ewan / Timpson, Paul / Leach, Joshua / McGarry, Lynn / Shanks, Emma / Bailey, Peter / Chang, David / Oien, Karin / Karim, Saadia / Au, Amy / Steele, Colin / Carter, Christopher Ross / McKay, Colin / Anderson, Kurt / Evans, Thomas R Jeffry / Marais, Richard / Springer, Caroline / Biankin, Andrew / Erler, Janine T / Sansom, Owen J. ·Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute Garscube Estate, Glasgow, UK. · The Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute, Withington Manchester, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · Institute of Cancer Sciences University of Glasgow Garscube Estate, Glasgow, UK. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute Garscube Estate, Glasgow, UK Institute of Cancer Sciences University of Glasgow Garscube Estate, Glasgow, UK. · Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK. · Biotech Research & Innovation Centre (BRIC), University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (UCPH), Denmark janine.erler@bric.ku.dk o.sansom@beatson.gla.ac.uk. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute Garscube Estate, Glasgow, UK janine.erler@bric.ku.dk o.sansom@beatson.gla.ac.uk. ·EMBO Mol Med · Pubmed #26077591.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality. Despite significant advances made in the treatment of other cancers, current chemotherapies offer little survival benefit in this disease. Pancreaticoduodenectomy offers patients the possibility of a cure, but most will die of recurrent or metastatic disease. Hence, preventing metastatic disease in these patients would be of significant benefit. Using principal component analysis (PCA), we identified a LOX/hypoxia signature associated with poor patient survival in resectable patients. We found that LOX expression is upregulated in metastatic tumors from Pdx1-Cre Kras(G12D/+) Trp53(R172H/+) (KPC) mice and that inhibition of LOX in these mice suppressed metastasis. Mechanistically, LOX inhibition suppressed both migration and invasion of KPC cells. LOX inhibition also synergized with gemcitabine to kill tumors and significantly prolonged tumor-free survival in KPC mice with early-stage tumors. This was associated with stromal alterations, including increased vasculature and decreased fibrillar collagen, and increased infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into tumors. Therefore, LOX inhibition is able to reverse many of the features that make PDAC inherently refractory to conventional therapies and targeting LOX could improve outcome in surgically resectable disease.

9 Article Expression of KOC, S100P, mesothelin and MUC1 in pancreatico-biliary adenocarcinomas: development and utility of a potential diagnostic immunohistochemistry panel. 2014

Ali, Asif / Brown, Victoria / Denley, Simon / Jamieson, Nigel B / Morton, Jennifer P / Nixon, Colin / Graham, Janet S / Sansom, Owen J / Carter, C Ross / McKay, Colin J / Duthie, Fraser R / Oien, Karin A. ·Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden G61 1QH, UK. · Pathology Laboratory, Forth Valley Royal Hospital, Stirling Road, Larbert FK5 4WR, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit and Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow G12 0YN, UK. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow & Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden G61 1QH, UK ; Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow & Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. ·BMC Clin Pathol · Pubmed #25071419.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatico-biliary adenocarcinomas (PBA) have a poor prognosis. Diagnosis is usually achieved by imaging and/or endoscopy with confirmatory cytology. Cytological interpretation can be difficult especially in the setting of chronic pancreatitis/cholangitis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) biomarkers could act as an adjunct to cytology to improve the diagnosis. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis and selected KOC, S100P, mesothelin and MUC1 for further validation in PBA resection specimens. METHODS: Tissue microarrays containing tumour and normal cores in a ratio of 3:2, from 99 surgically resected PBA patients, were used for IHC. IHC was performed on an automated platform using antibodies against KOC, S100P, mesothelin and MUC1. Tissue cores were scored for staining intensity and proportion of tissue stained using a Histoscore method (range, 0-300). Sensitivity and specificity for individual biomarkers, as well as biomarker panels, were determined with different cut-offs for positivity and compared by summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. RESULTS: The expression of all four biomarkers was high in PBA versus normal ducts, with a mean Histoscore of 150 vs. 0.4 for KOC, 165 vs. 0.3 for S100P, 115 vs. 0.5 for mesothelin and 200 vs. 14 for MUC1 (p < .0001 for all comparisons). Five cut-offs were carefully chosen for sensitivity/specificity analysis. Four of these cut-offs, namely 5%, 10% or 20% positive cells and Histoscore 20 were identified using ROC curve analysis and the fifth cut-off was moderate-strong staining intensity. Using 20% positive cells as a cut-off achieved higher sensitivity/specificity values: KOC 84%/100%; S100P 83%/100%; mesothelin 88%/92%; and MUC1 89%/63%. Analysis of a panel of KOC, S100P and mesothelin achieved 100% sensitivity and 99% specificity if at least 2 biomarkers were positive for 10% cut-off; and 100% sensitivity and specificity for 20% cut-off. CONCLUSION: A biomarker panel of KOC, S100P and mesothelin with at least 2 biomarkers positive was found to be an optimum panel with both 10% and 20% cut-offs in resection specimens from patients with PBA.

10 Article Targeting mTOR dependency in pancreatic cancer. 2014

Morran, Douglas C / Wu, Jianmin / Jamieson, Nigel B / Mrowinska, Agata / Kalna, Gabriela / Karim, Saadia A / Au, Amy Y M / Scarlett, Christopher J / Chang, David K / Pajak, Malgorzata Z / Anonymous6310790 / Oien, Karin A / McKay, Colin J / Carter, C Ross / Gillen, Gerry / Champion, Sue / Pimlott, Sally L / Anderson, Kurt I / Evans, T R Jeffry / Grimmond, Sean M / Biankin, Andrew V / Sansom, Owen J / Morton, Jennifer P. ·CRUK Beatson Institute, Glasgow, UK. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · School of Environmental & Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Faculty of Medicine, South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of NSW, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia The Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · CRUK Beatson Institute, Glasgow, UK Institute of Cancer Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · West of Scotland PET Centre, Gartnavel General Hospital, Glasgow, UK. · West of Scotland Radionuclide Dispensary, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Glasgow, UK. · The Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·Gut · Pubmed #24717934.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the Western world. Current chemotherapy regimens have modest survival benefit. Thus, novel, effective therapies are required for treatment of this disease. DESIGN: Activating KRAS mutation almost always drives pancreatic tumour initiation, however, deregulation of other potentially druggable pathways promotes tumour progression. PTEN loss leads to acceleration of Kras(G12D)-driven pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in mice and these tumours have high levels of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. To test whether these KRAS PTEN pancreatic tumours show mTOR dependence, we compared response to mTOR inhibition in this model, to the response in another established model of pancreatic cancer, KRAS P53. We also assessed whether there was a subset of pancreatic cancer patients who may respond to mTOR inhibition. RESULTS: We found that tumours in KRAS PTEN mice exhibit a remarkable dependence on mTOR signalling. In these tumours, mTOR inhibition leads to proliferative arrest and even tumour regression. Further, we could measure response using clinically applicable positron emission tomography imaging. Importantly, pancreatic tumours driven by activated KRAS and mutant p53 did not respond to treatment. In human tumours, approximately 20% of cases demonstrated low PTEN expression and a gene expression signature that overlaps with murine KRAS PTEN tumours. CONCLUSIONS: KRAS PTEN tumours are uniquely responsive to mTOR inhibition. Targeted anti-mTOR therapies may offer clinical benefit in subsets of human PDAC selected based on genotype, that are dependent on mTOR signalling. Thus, the genetic signatures of human tumours could be used to direct pancreatic cancer treatment in the future.

11 Article Activation of the IL-6R/Jak/stat pathway is associated with a poor outcome in resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2013

Denley, Simon M / Jamieson, Nigel B / McCall, Pamela / Oien, Karin A / Morton, Jennifer P / Carter, C Ross / Edwards, Joanne / McKay, Colin J. ·West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, G31 2ER, UK. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #23435739.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Chronic localized pancreatic inflammation in the form of chronic pancreatitis is an established risk factor for human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) development. Constitutive activation of inflammation-related signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)3 signaling has been implicated in the development and progression a number of malignancies, including PDAC. Although, the Janus Kinase (Jak)/Stat pathway is a potential drug target, clinicopathological, molecular, and prognostic features of Stat3-activated PDAC remain uncertain. Our aim was to determine the clinicopathological impact of this inflammatory pathway in resectable PDAC. METHODS: Using a tissue microarray-based cohort of PDAC from 86 patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy with curative intent and complete clinicopathological data available, we evaluated expression of the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R)/Jak/Stat pathway by immunohistochemistry. IL-6R, Jak, phospho (p)-Jak, Stat3, pStat3(Tyr705), and pStat3(Ser727) were assessed in PDAC and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. A Cox regression multivariate analysis model was used to determine factors influencing survival. Activation of the IL-6R/Jak/Stat3 pathway was compared with the systemic inflammatory response as measured by serum C-reactive protein levels. RESULTS: High pJak was associated with reduced overall survival in multivariate analysis when compared with those with moderate or low expression (p = 0.036; hazard ratio (HR) = 1.68) as was pStat3(Tyr705) (p < 0.001; HR = 2.66) independent of lymph node status and tumor grade. Patients with a combination of pJakhigh/pStat3(Tyr705) high expression had an especially poor prognosis (median survival of 8.8 months; 95 % CI, 4.4-13.2). While the IL-6R/Jak/Stat pathway did not correlate with serum C-reactive protein levels, high pStat3 expression was associated with a reduction in the density of the local tumoral immune response. CONCLUSION: Activation of the Jak/Stat3 pathway via phosphorylation was associated with adverse outcome following resection of PDAC with curative intent supporting potential roles for pJak and pStat3 as prognostic biomarkers markers and therapeutic targets.

12 Article The relationship between tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate and outcome in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2012

Jamieson, Nigel B / Mohamed, Mohamed / Oien, Karin A / Foulis, Alan K / Dickson, Euan J / Imrie, Clem W / Carter, C Ross / McKay, Colin J / McMillan, Donald C. ·West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. nigeljamieson@yahoo.com ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #22555345.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The tumor-associated inflammatory cell infiltrate is recognized to have prognostic value in various common solid tumors. However, the prognostic value of the tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate has not been established in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) nor has its relationship with the systemic inflammatory response. METHODS: Retrospective study was made of 173 patients who underwent surgery between 1997 and 2009. Routine pathology specimens were scored according to density of the tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate, and biochemical data were collected preoperatively. RESULTS: Low-grade tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate was associated with earlier tumor recurrence (P < 0.001) and particularly in the liver (P = 0.027). It was also associated with T3 tumors (P < 0.05), lymph node involvement (P < 0.05), and resection margin involvement (P < 0.05). On univariate survival analysis, age <65 years (P < 0.05), mGPS (P < 0.001), increased tumor stage (P < 0.01), nodal involvement (P < 0.01), size (P < 0.05), grade (P < 0.05), perineural invasion (P < 0.05), venous invasion (P < 0.01), resection margin involvement (P ≤ 0.001), vascular reconstruction (P < 0.05), and no adjuvant chemotherapy (P < 0.05) were associated with poor survival. In contrast, high-grade tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate was associated with better survival (P < 0.001). On multivariate survival analysis, mGPS [hazard ratio (HR): 1.77, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.19-2.62, P = 0.005], tumor stage (HR: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.16-4.23, P = 0.016), resection margin involvement (HR: 2.19, 95% CI: 1.41-3.44, P = 0.001), venous invasion (HR: 1.79, 95% CI: 1.22-2.63, P = 0.003), tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate (HR: 0.37, 95% CI: 0.25-0.55, P = 0.0001), and adjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.04) were independently prognostic. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study show, for the first time, that the presence of a high-grade tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate is an independent predictor of prolonged overall survival following resection for PDAC. Furthermore, measures of the local and the systemic inflammatory response were inversely associated.

13 Article MicroRNA molecular profiles associated with diagnosis, clinicopathologic criteria, and overall survival in patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2012

Jamieson, Nigel B / Morran, Douglas C / Morton, Jennifer P / Ali, Asif / Dickson, Euan J / Carter, C Ross / Sansom, Owen J / Evans, T R Jeffry / McKay, Colin J / Oien, Karin A. ·West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, G31 2ER, United Kingdom. nigeljamieson@yahoo.com ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #22114136.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: MicroRNAs (miRNA) have potential as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and as therapeutic targets in cancer. We sought to establish the relationship between miRNA expression and clinicopathologic parameters, including prognosis, in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Global miRNA microarray expression profiling of prospectively collected fresh-frozen PDAC tissue was done on an initial test cohort of 48 patients, who had undergone pancreaticoduodenectomy between 2003 and 2008 at a single institution. We evaluated association with tumor stage, lymph node status, and site of recurrence, in addition to overall survival, using Cox regression multivariate analysis. Validation of selected potentially prognostic miRNAs was done in a separate cohort of 24 patients. RESULTS: miRNA profiling identified expression signatures associated with PDAC, lymph node involvement, high tumor grade, and 20 miRNAs were associated with overall survival. In the initial cohort of 48 PDAC patients, high expression of miR-21 (HR = 3.22, 95% CI: 1.21-8.58) and reduced expression of miR-34a (HR = 0.15, 95% CI: 0.06-0.37) and miR-30d (HR = 0.30, 95% CI: 0.12-0.79) were associated with poor overall survival following resection independent of clinical covariates. In a further validation set of 24 patients, miR-21 and miR-34a expression again significantly correlated with overall survival (P = 0.031 and P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Expression patterns of miRNAs are significantly altered in PDAC. Aberrant expression of a number of miRNAs was independently associated with reduced survival, including overexpression of miR-21 and underexpression of miR-34a. SUMMARY: miRNA expression profiles for resected PDAC were examined to identify potentially prognostic miRNAs. miRNA microarray analysis identified statistically unique profiles, which could discriminate PDAC from paired nonmalignant pancreatic tissues as well as molecular signatures that differ according to pathologic features. miRNA expression profiles correlated with overall survival of PDAC following resection, indicating that miRNAs provide prognostic utility.

14 Article Activation of the PIK3CA/AKT pathway suppresses senescence induced by an activated RAS oncogene to promote tumorigenesis. 2011

Kennedy, Alyssa L / Morton, Jennifer P / Manoharan, Indrani / Nelson, David M / Jamieson, Nigel B / Pawlikowski, Jeff S / McBryan, Tony / Doyle, Brendan / McKay, Colin / Oien, Karin A / Enders, Greg H / Zhang, Rugang / Sansom, Owen J / Adams, Peter D. ·Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19129, USA; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111, USA. ·Mol Cell · Pubmed #21474066.

ABSTRACT: Mutations in both RAS and the PTEN/PIK3CA/AKT signaling module are found in the same human tumors. PIK3CA and AKT are downstream effectors of RAS, and the selective advantage conferred by mutation of two genes in the same pathway is unclear. Based on a comparative molecular analysis, we show that activated PIK3CA/AKT is a weaker inducer of senescence than is activated RAS. Moreover, concurrent activation of RAS and PIK3CA/AKT impairs RAS-induced senescence. In vivo, bypass of RAS-induced senescence by activated PIK3CA/AKT correlates with accelerated tumorigenesis. Thus, not all oncogenes are equally potent inducers of senescence, and, paradoxically, a weak inducer of senescence (PIK3CA/AKT) can be dominant over a strong inducer of senescence (RAS). For tumor growth, one selective advantage of concurrent mutation of RAS and PTEN/PIK3CA/AKT is suppression of RAS-induced senescence. Evidence is presented that this new understanding can be exploited in rational development and targeted application of prosenescence cancer therapies.

15 Article Peripancreatic fat invasion is an independent predictor of poor outcome following pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2011

Jamieson, Nigel Balfour / Foulis, Alan K / Oien, Karin A / Dickson, Euan J / Imrie, Clem W / Carter, Ross / McKay, Colin J. ·West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. nigeljamieson@yahoo.com ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #21116727.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Following pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), identification of peripancreatic fat tumor invasion promotes a tumor to stage T3. We sought to understand better the impact of histological peripancreatic fat invasion on prognosis and site of recurrence in a cohort of patients with PDAC. METHODS: We analyzed the patient demographics, outcome, and recurrence data that had been prospectively collected in 189 consecutive PDAC undergoing potentially curative pancreaticoduodenectomy between 1996 and 2009. Pathological features were reassessed for all patients. Survival outcome was compared using Kaplan-Meier/Cox proportional hazards analysis. The primary site of recurrence was defined as either locoregional or distant metastases. RESULTS: The median survival of this PDAC cohort was 18.9 months (95% confidence interval (CI) 15.7-22.2). Histological peripancreatic fat invasion was evident in 51 (27%) patients and was associated with lymph node metastases (p = 0.004) and larger tumor size (p = 0.015). The presence of peripancreatic fat invasion was associated with reduced overall survival following resection (12.4 months [95% CI 9.9-15.0]) when compared to those patients with no evidence of fat invasion (22.6 months [95% CI 18.5-26.7]; p < 0.0001). By multivariate survival analysis, independent predictors of overall survival included tumor grade (p = 0.002), lymph node involvement (p = 0.025), resection margin status (p = 0.003), venous invasion (p = 0.045), and peripancreatic fat invasion (p = 0.007). Invasion into the pancreatic fat was significantly associated with the primary site of recurrence being locoregional failure (p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Peripancreatic fat invasion was identified as being an independent predictor of poor outcome following pancreaticoduodenectomy for PDAC. Additionally, the presence of peripancreatic fat invasion was associated with locoregional disease as the primary site of recurrence. This may have implications for the staging of PDAC and potentially require incorporation into future staging systems to improve outcome stratification.

16 Article Positive mobilization margins alone do not influence survival following pancreatico-duodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2010

Jamieson, Nigel B / Foulis, Alan K / Oien, Karin A / Going, James J / Glen, Paul / Dickson, Euan J / Imrie, Clem W / McKay, Colin J / Carter, Ross. ·West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Department of Pancreatico-Biliary Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, United Kingdom. nigeljamieson@yahoo.com ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #20485150.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the prognostic influence of residual tumor at or within 1 mm of the mobilization margins (R1Mobilization) compared with transection margins (R1Transection) following pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). BACKGROUND: The prognostic strength of R1 status increases with frequency of margin positivity and is enhanced by protocol driven pathology reporting. Currently, margins are treated uniformly with tumor at or close to any margin considered of equal prognostic significance. The resection involves a mobilization phase freeing the posterior margin and anterior surface then a transection phase requiring lympho-vascular division forming the medial resection and pancreatic transection margin. The comparative assessment of the relative importance of tumor involvement of these different margins has not previously been investigated. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 148 consecutive resections for PDAC from 1996-2007 was performed. The individual (pancreatic transection, medial, posterior, and anterior surface) margins were separately identified and analyzed by a senior pathologist. An R1 resection was defined as microscopic evidence of tumor < or = 1 mm from a resection margin. R1Mobilization tumor extension included both R1Anterior and R1Posterior cases; while R1Transection included pancreatic neck/body transection, R1Medial and adjacent transection margins. RESULTS: R1 status was confirmed in 109 patients (74%). The medial (46%) and posterior (44%) margins were most commonly involved. R1 status was found to an independent predictor of poor outcome (P < 0.001). R1Mobilization involvement only (n = 48) was associated with a significantly longer median survival of 18.9 months (95% CI, 13.7-24.8) versus 11.1 months (95% CI, 7.1-15.0) for those with R1Transection tumor involvement (n = 61) (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the survival of the R1Mobilization compared with R0 group (P = 0.52). CONCLUSIONS: Following pancreaticoduodenectomy for PDAC, involvement of the transection margins in contrast to mobilization margins defines a group whose outcome is significantly worse. This may impact upon the allocation of adjuvant therapy within the setting of randomized controlled trials.

17 Article LKB1 haploinsufficiency cooperates with Kras to promote pancreatic cancer through suppression of p21-dependent growth arrest. 2010

Morton, Jennifer P / Jamieson, Nigel B / Karim, Saadia A / Athineos, Dimitris / Ridgway, Rachel A / Nixon, Colin / McKay, Colin J / Carter, Ross / Brunton, Valerie G / Frame, Margaret C / Ashworth, Alan / Oien, Karin A / Evans, T R Jeffry / Sansom, Owen J. ·Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Garscube Estate, Glasgow, UK. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #20452353.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients carrying germline mutations of LKB1 have an increased risk of pancreatic cancer; however, it is unclear whether down-regulation of LKB1 is an important event in sporadic pancreatic cancer. In this study, we aimed to investigate the impact of LKB1 down-regulation for pancreatic cancer in mouse and human and to elucidate the mechanism by which Lkb1 deregulation contributes to this disease. METHODS: We first investigated the consequences of Lkb1 deficiency in a genetically modified mouse model of pancreatic cancer, both in terms of disease progression and at the molecular level. To test the relevance of our findings to human pancreatic cancer, we investigated levels of LKB1 and its potential targets in human pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: We definitively show that Lkb1 haploinsufficiency can cooperate with oncogenic KrasG12D to cause pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in the mouse. Mechanistically, this was associated with decreased p53/p21-dependent growth arrest. Haploinsufficiency for p21 (Cdkn1a) also synergizes with KrasG12D to drive PDAC in the mouse. We also found that levels of LKB1 expression were decreased in around 20% of human PDAC and significantly correlated with low levels of p21 and a poor prognosis. Remarkably, all tumors that had low levels of LKB1 had low levels of p21, and these tumors did not express mutant p53. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a novel LKB1-p21 axis that suppresses PDAC following Kras mutation in vivo. Down-regulation of LKB1 may therefore serve as an alternative to p53 mutation to drive pancreatic cancer in vivo.

18 Article Dasatinib inhibits the development of metastases in a mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2010

Morton, Jennifer P / Karim, Saadia A / Graham, Kathryn / Timpson, Paul / Jamieson, Nigel / Athineos, Dimitris / Doyle, Brendan / McKay, Colin / Heung, Man-Yeung / Oien, Karin A / Frame, Margaret C / Evans, T R Jeffry / Sansom, Owen J / Brunton, Valerie G. ·Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Glasgow, United Kingdom. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #20303350.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly invasive and metastatic disease for which conventional treatments are of limited efficacy. A number of agents in development are potential anti-invasive and antimetastatic agents, including the Src kinase inhibitor dasatinib. The aim of this study was to assess the importance of Src in human PDAC and to use a genetically engineered mouse model of PDAC to determine the effects of dasatinib on PDAC progression. METHODS: Src expression and activity was measured by immunohistochemistry in 114 human PDACs. Targeting expression of Trp53(R172H) and Kras(G12D) to the mouse pancreas results in the formation of invasive and metastatic PDAC. These mice were treated with dasatinib, and disease progression monitored. Cell lines were derived from mouse PDACs, and in vitro effects of dasatinib assessed. RESULTS: Src expression and activity were up-regulated in human PDAC and this correlated with reduced survival. Dasatinib inhibited the migration and invasion of PDAC cell lines, although no effects on proliferation were seen at concentrations that inhibited Src kinase activity. In addition, dasatinib significantly inhibited the development of metastases in Pdx1-Cre, Z/EGFP, LSL-Kras(G12D/+), LSL-Trp53(R172H/+) mice. However, there was no survival advantage in the dasatinib-treated animals owing to continued growth of the primary tumor. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the importance of Src in human PDAC and shows the usefulness of a genetically engineered mouse model of PDAC for assessing the activity of potential antimetastatic agents and suggests that dasatinib should be evaluated further as monotherapy after resection of localized invasive PDAC.