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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Alexis L. Norris
Based on 6 articles published since 2010
(Why 6 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Alexis Norris wrote the following 6 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Alterations of type II classical cadherin, cadherin-10 (CDH10), is associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. 2017

Jinawath, Natini / Shiao, Meng-Shin / Norris, Alexis / Murphy, Kathleen / Klein, Alison P / Yonescu, Raluca / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine / Meeker, Alan / Jinawath, Artit / Yeo, Charles J / Eshleman, James R / Hruban, Ralph H / Brody, Jonathan R / Griffin, Constance A / Harada, Shuko. ·Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Research Center, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Center for Pancreatic, Biliary and Related Cancers, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. ·Genes Chromosomes Cancer · Pubmed #28124395.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), either sporadic or familial, has a dismal prognosis and finding candidate genes involved in development of the cancer is crucial for the patient care. First, we identified two patients with germline alterations in or adjacent to CDH10 by chromosome studies and sequencing analyses in 41 familial pancreatic cancer (FPC) cases. One patient had a balanced translocation between chromosome 5 and 20. The breakpoint on chromosome band 5p14.2 was ∼810 Kb upstream of CDH10, while that on chromosome arm 20p was in the pericentromeric region which might result in inactivation of one copy of the gene leading to reduced expression of CDH10. This interpretation was supported by loss of heterozygosity (LOH) seen in this region as determined by short tandem repeat analyses. Another patient had a single nucleotide variant in exon 12 (p.Arg688Gln) of CDH10. This amino acid was conserved among vertebrates and the mutation was predicted to have a pathogenic effect on the protein by several prediction algorithms. Next, we analyzed LOH status in the CDH10 region in sporadic PDAC and at least 24% of tumors had evidence of LOH. Immunohistochemical stains with CDH10 antibody showed a different staining pattern between normal pancreatic ducts and PDAC. Taken together, our data supports the notion that CDH10 is involved in sporadic pancreatic carcinogenesis, and might have a role in rare cases of FPC. Further functional studies are needed to elucidate the tumor suppressive role of CDH10 in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

2 Article Nanopore sequencing detects structural variants in cancer. 2016

Norris, Alexis L / Workman, Rachael E / Fan, Yunfan / Eshleman, James R / Timp, Winston. ·a Departments of Pathology and Oncology , The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine , Baltimore , MD , USA. · b Department of Biomedical Engineering , Johns Hopkins University , Baltimore , MD , USA. ·Cancer Biol Ther · Pubmed #26787508.

ABSTRACT: Despite advances in sequencing, structural variants (SVs) remain difficult to reliably detect due to the short read length (<300 bp) of 2nd generation sequencing. Not only do the reads (or paired-end reads) need to straddle a breakpoint, but repetitive elements often lead to ambiguities in the alignment of short reads. We propose to use the long-reads (up to 20 kb) possible with 3rd generation sequencing, specifically nanopore sequencing on the MinION. Nanopore sequencing relies on a similar concept to a Coulter counter, reading the DNA sequence from the change in electrical current resulting from a DNA strand being forced through a nanometer-sized pore embedded in a membrane. Though nanopore sequencing currently has a relatively high mismatch rate that precludes base substitution and small frameshift mutation detection, its accuracy is sufficient for SV detection because of its long reads. In fact, long reads in some cases may improve SV detection efficiency. We have tested nanopore sequencing to detect a series of well-characterized SVs, including large deletions, inversions, and translocations that inactivate the CDKN2A/p16 and SMAD4/DPC4 tumor suppressor genes in pancreatic cancer. Using PCR amplicon mixes, we have demonstrated that nanopore sequencing can detect large deletions, translocations and inversions at dilutions as low as 1:100, with as few as 500 reads per sample. Given the speed, small footprint, and low capital cost, nanopore sequencing could become the ideal tool for the low-level detection of cancer-associated SVs needed for molecular relapse, early detection, or therapeutic monitoring.

3 Article Whole Genome Sequencing Defines the Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Pancreatic Cancer. 2016

Roberts, Nicholas J / Norris, Alexis L / Petersen, Gloria M / Bondy, Melissa L / Brand, Randall / Gallinger, Steven / Kurtz, Robert C / Olson, Sara H / Rustgi, Anil K / Schwartz, Ann G / Stoffel, Elena / Syngal, Sapna / Zogopoulos, George / Ali, Syed Z / Axilbund, Jennifer / Chaffee, Kari G / Chen, Yun-Ching / Cote, Michele L / Childs, Erica J / Douville, Christopher / Goes, Fernando S / Herman, Joseph M / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine / Kramer, Melissa / Makohon-Moore, Alvin / McCombie, Richard W / McMahon, K Wyatt / Niknafs, Noushin / Parla, Jennifer / Pirooznia, Mehdi / Potash, James B / Rhim, Andrew D / Smith, Alyssa L / Wang, Yuxuan / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Wood, Laura D / Zandi, Peter P / Goggins, Michael / Karchin, Rachel / Eshleman, James R / Papadopoulos, Nickolas / Kinzler, Kenneth W / Vogelstein, Bert / Hruban, Ralph H / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Ludwig Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, Departments of Medicine and Genetics, Pancreatic Cancer Translational Center of Excellence, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Population Sciences Division, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Gastroenterology Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Institute for Computational Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York. · Ludwig Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York. inGenious Targeting Laboratory, Ronkonkoma, New York. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. · Division of Gastroenterology, Departments of Medicine and Genetics, Pancreatic Cancer Translational Center of Excellence, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Department of Surgery, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Medicine, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Ludwig Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. ·Cancer Discov · Pubmed #26658419.

ABSTRACT: SIGNIFICANCE: The genetic basis of disease susceptibility in the majority of patients with familial pancreatic cancer is unknown. We whole genome sequenced 638 patients with familial pancreatic cancer and demonstrate that the genetic underpinning of inherited pancreatic cancer is highly heterogeneous. This has significant implications for the management of patients with familial pancreatic cancer.

4 Article KRAS and guanine nucleotide-binding protein mutations in pancreatic juice collected from the duodenum of patients at high risk for neoplasia undergoing endoscopic ultrasound. 2015

Eshleman, James R / Norris, Alexis L / Sadakari, Yoshihiko / Debeljak, Marija / Borges, Michael / Harrington, Colleen / Lin, Elaine / Brant, Aaron / Barkley, Thomas / Almario, J Alejandro / Topazian, Mark / Farrell, James / Syngal, Sapna / Lee, Jeffrey H / Yu, Jun / Hruban, Ralph H / Kanda, Mitsuro / Canto, Marcia Irene / Goggins, Michael. ·Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: jeshlem@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. · MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Medicine, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Medicine, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: mgoggins@jhmi.edu. ·Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #25481712.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Pancreatic imaging can identify neoplastic cysts but not microscopic neoplasms. Mutation analysis of pancreatic fluid after secretin stimulation might identify microscopic neoplasias in the pancreatic duct system. We determined the prevalence of mutations in KRAS and guanine nucleotide-binding protein α-stimulating genes in pancreatic juice from subjects undergoing endoscopic ultrasound for suspected pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, or pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS: Secretin-stimulated juice samples were collected from the duodenum of 272 subjects enrolled in Cancer of the Pancreas Screening studies; 194 subjects were screened because of a family history of, or genetic predisposition to, pancreatic cancer, and 78 subjects were evaluated for pancreatic cancer (n = 30) or other disorders (controls: pancreatic cysts, pancreatitis, or normal pancreata, n = 48). Mutations were detected by digital high-resolution melt-curve analysis and pyrosequencing. The number of replicates containing a mutation determined the mutation score. RESULTS: KRAS mutations were detected in pancreatic juice from larger percentages of subjects with pancreatic cancer (73%) or undergoing cancer screening (50%) than controls (19%) (P = .0005). A greater proportion of patients with pancreatic cancer had at least 1 KRAS mutation detected 3 or more times (47%) than screened subjects (21%) or controls (6%, P = .002). Among screened subjects, mutations in KRAS (but not guanine nucleotide-binding protein α-stimulating) were found in similar percentages of patients with or without pancreatic cysts. However, a greater proportion of patients older than age 50 years had KRAS mutations (54.6%) than younger patients (36.3%) (P = .032); the older subjects also had more mutations in KRAS (P = .02). CONCLUSIONS: Mutations in KRAS are detected in pancreatic juice from the duodenum of 73% of patients with pancreatic cancer, and 50% of asymptomatic individuals with a high risk for pancreatic cancer. However, KRAS mutations were detected in pancreatic juice from 19% of controls. Mutations detected in individuals without pancreatic abnormalities, based on imaging analyses, likely arise from small pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions. ClinicalTrials.gov no: NCT00438906 and NCT00714701.

5 Article Familial and sporadic pancreatic cancer share the same molecular pathogenesis. 2015

Norris, Alexis L / Roberts, Nicholas J / Jones, Siân / Wheelan, Sarah J / Papadopoulos, Nickolas / Vogelstein, Bert / Kinzler, Kenneth W / Hruban, Ralph H / Klein, Alison P / Eshleman, James R. ·Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Room 344, Cancer Research Building-II, 1550 Orleans Street, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. ·Fam Cancer · Pubmed #25240578.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is nearly uniformly lethal, with a median overall survival in 2014 of only 6 months. The genetic progression of sporadic PDAC (SPC) is well established, with common somatic alterations in KRAS, p16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4. Up to 10 % of all PDAC cases occur in families with two or more affected first-degree relatives (familial pancreatic cancer, FPC), but these cases do not appear to present at an obviously earlier age of onset. This is unusual because most familial cancer syndrome patients present at a substantially younger age than that of corresponding sporadic cases. Here we collated the reported age of onset for FPC and SPC from the literature. We then used an integrated approach including whole exomic sequencing, whole genome sequencing, RNA sequencing, and high density SNP microarrays to study a cohort of FPC cell lines and corresponding germline samples. We show that the four major SPC driver genes are also consistently altered in FPC and that each of the four detection strategies was able to detect the mutations in these genes, with one exception. We conclude that FPC undergoes a similar somatic molecular pathogenesis as SPC, and that the same gene targets can be used for early detection and minimal residual disease testing in FPC patients.

6 Article Clinicopathological characteristics and molecular analyses of multifocal intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas. 2012

Matthaei, Hanno / Norris, Alexis L / Tsiatis, Athanasios C / Olino, Kelly / Hong, Seung-Mo / dal Molin, Marco / Goggins, Michael G / Canto, Marcia / Horton, Karen M / Jackson, Keith D / Capelli, Paola / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Bortesi, Laura / Furukawa, Toru / Egawa, Shinichi / Ishida, Masaharu / Ottomo, Shigeru / Unno, Michiaki / Motoi, Fuyuhiko / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Edil, Barish H / Cameron, John L / Eshleman, James R / Schulick, Richard D / Maitra, Anirban / Hruban, Ralph H. ·Department of General, Visceral, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University of Bonn, Germany. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #22167000.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To examine the clinicopathologic features and clonal relationship of multifocal intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas. BACKGROUND: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are increasingly diagnosed cystic precursor lesions of pancreatic cancer. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms can be multifocal and a potential cause of recurrence after partial pancreatectomy. METHODS: Thirty four patients with histologically documented multifocal IPMNs were collected and their clinicopathologic features catalogued. In addition, thirty multifocal IPMNs arising in 13 patients from 3 hospitals were subjected to laser microdissection followed by KRAS pyrosequencing and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis on chromosomes 6q and 17p. Finally, we sought to assess the clonal relationships among multifocal IPMNs. RESULTS: We identified 34 patients with histologically documented multifocal IPMNs. Synchronous IPMNs were present in 29 patients (85%), whereas 5 (15%) developed clinically significant metachronous IPMNs. Six patients (18%) had a history of familial pancreatic cancer. A majority of multifocal IPMNs (86% synchronous, 100% metachronous) were composed of branch duct lesions, and typically demonstrated a gastric-foveolar subtype epithelium with low or intermediate grades of dysplasia. Three synchronous IPMNs (10%) had an associated invasive cancer. Molecular analysis of multiple IPMNs from 13 patients demonstrated nonoverlapping KRAS gene mutations in 8 patients (62%) and discordant LOH profiles in 7 patients (54%); independent genetic alterations were established in 9 of the 13 patients (69%). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of multifocal IPMNs arise independently and exhibit a gastric-foveolar subtype, with low to intermediate dysplasia. These findings underscore the importance of life-long follow-up after resection for an IPMN.