Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Emmanuelle Norguet
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Emmanuelle Norguet wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Therapeutic Targets Revealed by Tumor-Stroma Cross-Talk Analyses in Patient-Derived Xenografts. 2017

Nicolle, Rémy / Blum, Yuna / Marisa, Laetitia / Loncle, Celine / Gayet, Odile / Moutardier, Vincent / Turrini, Olivier / Giovannini, Marc / Bian, Benjamin / Bigonnet, Martin / Rubis, Marion / Elarouci, Nabila / Armenoult, Lucile / Ayadi, Mira / Duconseil, Pauline / Gasmi, Mohamed / Ouaissi, Mehdi / Maignan, Aurélie / Lomberk, Gwen / Boher, Jean-Marie / Ewald, Jacques / Bories, Erwan / Garnier, Jonathan / Goncalves, Anthony / Poizat, Flora / Raoul, Jean-Luc / Secq, Veronique / Garcia, Stephane / Grandval, Philippe / Barraud-Blanc, Marine / Norguet, Emmanuelle / Gilabert, Marine / Delpero, Jean-Robert / Roques, Julie / Calvo, Ezequiel / Guillaumond, Fabienne / Vasseur, Sophie / Urrutia, Raul / de Reyniès, Aurélien / Dusetti, Nelson / Iovanna, Juan. ·Programme Cartes d'Identité des Tumeurs (CIT), Ligue Nationale Contre le Cancer, Paris, France. Electronic address: remy.nicolle@ligue-cancer.net. · Programme Cartes d'Identité des Tumeurs (CIT), Ligue Nationale Contre le Cancer, Paris, France. · Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), INSERM U1068, CNRS UMR 7258, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix Marseille Université, Marseille, France. · Hôpital Nord, Marseille, France; Aix Marseille Université, Marseille, France. · Aix Marseille Université, Marseille, France; Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille, France. · Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille, France. · Hôpital Nord, Marseille, France. · Division of Research, Department of Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA. · Aix Marseille Université, Marseille, France; Hôpital de la Timone, Marseille, France. · Hôpital de la Timone, Marseille, France. · Centre Génomique du Centre de Recherche du CHUL Research Center, Ville de Québec, QC, Canada. · Division of Research, Department of Surgery, Genomic Sciences and Precision Medicine Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA. · Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), INSERM U1068, CNRS UMR 7258, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix Marseille Université, Marseille, France. Electronic address: juan.iovanna@inserm.fr. ·Cell Rep · Pubmed #29186684.

ABSTRACT: Preclinical models based on patient-derived xenografts have remarkable specificity in distinguishing transformed human tumor cells from non-transformed murine stromal cells computationally. We obtained 29 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) xenografts from either resectable or non-resectable patients (surgery and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirate, respectively). Extensive multiomic profiling revealed two subtypes with distinct clinical outcomes. These subtypes uncovered specific alterations in DNA methylation and transcription as well as in signaling pathways involved in tumor-stromal cross-talk. The analysis of these pathways indicates therapeutic opportunities for targeting both compartments and their interactions. In particular, we show that inhibiting NPC1L1 with Ezetimibe, a clinically available drug, might be an efficient approach for treating pancreatic cancers. These findings uncover the complex and diverse interplay between PDAC tumors and the stroma and demonstrate the pivotal role of xenografts for drug discovery and relevance to PDAC.

2 Article Rapid deaminator status is associated with poor clinical outcome in pancreatic cancer patients treated with a gemcitabine-based regimen. 2013

Serdjebi, Cindy / Seitz, Jean-François / Ciccolini, Joseph / Duluc, Muriel / Norguet, Emmanuelle / Fina, Frédéric / Lacarelle, Bruno / Ouafik, L'houcine / Dahan, Laetitia. ·Transfer Oncology Laboratory, Nord University Hospital of Marseille, Inserm S_911 CRO2, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France. ·Pharmacogenomics · Pubmed #23837479.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gemcitabine is a mainstay in the treatment of biliary and pancreatic cancers, with limited efficacy in most settings. The gemcitabine elimination pattern is primarily driven by deamination in the liver by CDA. CDA is affected by genetic polymorphisms, leading to marked variations in activity and, subsequently, to erratic drug plasma exposures in patients administered with standard dosage. CDA deficiency has been a rising concern with gemcitabine since several studies have proven that poor metabolizer patients experience life-threatening toxicities upon drug intake. In theory, ultrarapid metabolizer (UM) patients should be conversely at risk of treatment failure, although thus far few studies have addressed this issue in digestive oncology. PATIENTS & METHODS: A pilot study was conducted on 40 pancreatic cancer patients, all treated with gemcitabine-based therapy. CDA status was primarily established on a phenotypic basis determined by measurement of residual CDA enzymatic activity in serum. Additionally, a search for c208G>A and c79A>C polymorphisms was carried out. RESULTS: No patients carrying c208G>A polymorphisms were found, and only heterozygous c79A>C patients were observed. Eight out of the 40 patients (i.e., 20%) were identified as UM, with CDA activities over 6 U/mg. CDA activity was significantly different between progressive disease patients and patients with controlled disease (8.4 vs 3 U/mg; p < 0.001). Conversely, fewer gemcitabine-related severe toxicities were observed in UM patients. CONCLUSION: This pilot study strongly suggests that UM patients are nearly five-times more likely to have progressive disease than patients with normal or low CDA activities, and that beside molecular events at the tumor level, upstream deregulations affecting drug disposition should be taken into account.