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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Willem Niesen
Based on 6 articles published since 2009
(Why 6 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, W. Niesen wrote the following 6 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Outcomes and Risk Score for Distal Pancreatectomy with Celiac Axis Resection (DP-CAR): An International Multicenter Analysis. 2019

Klompmaker, Sjors / Peters, Niek A / van Hilst, Jony / Bassi, Claudio / Boggi, Ugo / Busch, Olivier R / Niesen, Willem / Van Gulik, Thomas M / Javed, Ammar A / Kleeff, Jorg / Kawai, Manabu / Lesurtel, Mickael / Lombardo, Carlo / Moser, A James / Okada, Ken-Ichi / Popescu, Irinel / Prasad, Raj / Salvia, Roberto / Sauvanet, Alain / Sturesson, Christian / Weiss, Matthew J / Zeh, Herbert J / Zureikat, Amer H / Yamaue, Hiroki / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Hogg, Melissa E / Besselink, Marc G / Anonymous2651208. ·Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Utrecht Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Visceral, Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Saale, Germany. · Second Department of Surgery, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan. · Department of Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Croix-Rousse University Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, University of Lyon I, Lyon, France. · The Pancreas and Liver Institute, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Center of General Surgery and Liver Transplant, Fundeni Clinical Institute, Bucharest, Romania. · Department of HPB and Transplant Services, National Health Service, Leeds, UK. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hôpital Beaujon, APHP, University Paris VII, Clichy, France. · Division of Surgery, Department for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Department of Surgery, Northshore University HealthSystem, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. m.g.besselink@amc.nl. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30610560.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection (DP-CAR) is a treatment option for selected patients with pancreatic cancer involving the celiac axis. A recent multicenter European study reported a 90-day mortality rate of 16%, highlighting the importance of patient selection. The authors constructed a risk score to predict 90-day mortality and assessed oncologic outcomes. METHODS: This multicenter retrospective cohort study investigated patients undergoing DP-CAR at 20 European centers from 12 countries (model design 2000-2016) and three very-high-volume international centers in the United States and Japan (model validation 2004-2017). The area under receiver operator curve (AUC) and calibration plots were used for validation of the 90-day mortality risk model. Secondary outcomes included resection margin status, adjuvant therapy, and survival. RESULTS: For 191 DP-CAR patients, the 90-day mortality rate was 5.5% (95 confidence interval [CI], 2.2-11%) at 5 high-volume (≥ 1 DP-CAR/year) and 18% (95 CI, 9-30%) at 18 low-volume DP-CAR centers (P = 0.015). A risk score with age, sex, body mass index (BMI), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, multivisceral resection, open versus minimally invasive surgery, and low- versus high-volume center performed well in both the design and validation cohorts (AUC, 0.79 vs 0.74; P = 0.642). For 174 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the R0 resection rate was 60%, neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies were applied for respectively 69% and 67% of the patients, and the median overall survival period was 19 months (95 CI, 15-25 months). CONCLUSIONS: When performed for selected patients at high-volume centers, DP-CAR is associated with acceptable 90-day mortality and overall survival. The authors propose a 90-day mortality risk score to improve patient selection and outcomes, with DP-CAR volume as the dominant predictor.

2 Article Validation of at least 1 mm as cut-off for resection margins for pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body and tail. 2018

Hank, T / Hinz, U / Tarantino, I / Kaiser, J / Niesen, W / Bergmann, F / Hackert, T / Büchler, M W / Strobel, O. ·Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Br J Surg · Pubmed #29738626.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The definition of resection margin (R) status in pancreatic cancer is under debate. Although a margin of at least 1 mm is an independent predictor of survival after resection for pancreatic head cancer, its relevance to pancreatic body and tail cancers remains unclear. This study aimed to validate R status based on a 1-mm tumour-free margin as a prognostic factor for resected adenocarcinoma involving the pancreatic body and tail. METHODS: Patients who underwent distal or total pancreatectomy for adenocarcinomas of the pancreatic body and tail between January 2006 and December 2014 were identified from a prospective database. Resection margins were evaluated using a predefined cut-off of 1 mm. Rates of R0, R1 with invasion within 1 mm of the margin (R1 less than 1 mm), and R1 with direct invasion of the resection margin (R1 direct) were determined, and overall survival in each group assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of survival. RESULTS: R0 resection was achieved in 107 (23·5 per cent) and R1 in 348 (76·5 per cent) of 455 patients. Among R1 resections, invasion within 1 mm of the margin was found in 104 (22·9 per cent) and direct invasion in 244 (53·6 per cent). The R0 rate was 28·9 per cent after distal and 18·6 per cent after total pancreatectomy. In the total cohort, median survival times for patients with R0, R1 (less than 1 mm) and R1 (direct) status were 62·4, 24·6 and 17·2 months respectively, with 5-year survival rates of 52·6, 16·8 and 13·0 per cent (P < 0·001). In patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy, respective median survival times were 68·6, 32·8 and 21·4 months, with 5-year survival rates of 56, 22 and 16·0 per cent (P < 0·001). In multivariable analysis, R status was independently associated with survival. CONCLUSION: A cut-off of at least 1 mm for evaluation of resection margins is an independent determinant of survival after resection of adenocarcinomas of the pancreatic body and tail.

3 Article Outcomes After Distal Pancreatectomy with Celiac Axis Resection for Pancreatic Cancer: A Pan-European Retrospective Cohort Study. 2018

Klompmaker, Sjors / van Hilst, Jony / Gerritsen, Sarah L / Adham, Mustapha / Teresa Albiol Quer, M / Bassi, Claudio / Berrevoet, Frederik / Boggi, Ugo / Busch, Olivier R / Cesaretti, Manuela / Dalla Valle, Raffaele / Darnis, Benjamin / De Pastena, Matteo / Del Chiaro, Marco / Grützmann, Robert / Diener, Markus K / Dumitrascu, Traian / Friess, Helmut / Ivanecz, Arpad / Karayiannakis, Anastasios / Fusai, Giuseppe K / Labori, Knut J / Lombardo, Carlo / López-Ben, Santiago / Mabrut, Jean-Yves / Niesen, Willem / Pardo, Fernando / Perinel, Julie / Popescu, Irinel / Roeyen, Geert / Sauvanet, Alain / Prasad, Raj / Sturesson, Christian / Lesurtel, Mickael / Kleeff, Jorg / Salvia, Roberto / Besselink, Marc G / Anonymous1461438. ·Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Digestive Surgery, E. Herriot Hospital, HCL, UCBL1, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr. Josep Trueta, Girona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General and HPB Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy Cedex, France. · Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Unit, Parma University Hospital, Parma, Italy. · Department of Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Croix-Rousse University Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, University of Lyon I, Lyon, France. · Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany. · Center of General Surgery and Liver Transplant, Fundeni Clinical Institute, Bucharest, Romania. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Abdominal and General Surgery, University Medical Centre Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia. · Second Department of Surgery, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece. · HPB Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of HPB and Transplant Surgery, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Department of Hepatobiliary, Endocrine and Transplantation Surgery, Antwerp University Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium. · Department of HPB and Transplant Services, National Health Service, Leeds, UK. · Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Visceral, Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. m.g.besselink@amc.nl. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29532342.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Western multicenter studies on distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection (DP-CAR), also known as the Appleby procedure, for locally advanced pancreatic cancer are lacking. We aimed to study overall survival, morbidity, mortality and the impact of preoperative hepatic artery embolization (PHAE). METHODS: Retrospective cohort study within the European-African Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary-Association, on DP-CAR between 1-1-2000 and 6-1-2016. Primary endpoint was overall survival. Secondary endpoints were radicality (R0-resection), 90-day mortality, major morbidity, and pancreatic fistulae (grade B/C). RESULTS: We included 68 patients from 20 hospitals in 12 countries. Postoperatively, 53% of patients had R0-resection, 25% major morbidity, 21% an ISGPS grade B/C pancreatic fistula, and 16% mortality. In total, 82% received (neo-)adjuvant chemotherapy and median overall survival in 62 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients was 18 months (CI 10-37). We observed no impact of PHAE on ischemic complications. CONCLUSIONS: DP-CAR combined with chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer is associated with acceptable overall survival. The 90-day mortality is too high and should be reduced. Future studies should investigate to what extent increasing surgical volume or better patient selection can improve outcomes.

4 Article Do pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis share the same genetic risk factors? A PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium investigation. 2018

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Capurso, Gabriele / Hackert, Thilo / Di Leo, Milena / Izbicki, Jakob R / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Gioffreda, Domenica / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Pasquali, Claudio / Macinga, Peter / Kaaks, Rudolf / Stigliano, Serena / Peeters, Petra H / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Vodicka, Pavel / Valente, Roberto / Vashist, Yogesh K / Salvia, Roberto / Papaconstantinou, Ioannis / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Valsuani, Chiara / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Gazouli, Maria / Valantiene, Irena / Niesen, Willem / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Hara, Kazuo / Soucek, Pavel / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Johnson, Theron / Brenner, Herman / Tavano, Francesca / Fogar, Paola / Ito, Hidemi / Sperti, Cosimo / Butterbach, Katja / Latiano, Anna / Andriulli, Angelo / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Busch, Olivier R C / Dijk, Frederike / Greenhalf, William / Matsuo, Keitaro / Lombardo, Carlo / Strobel, Oliver / König, Anna-Katharina / Cuk, Katarina / Strothmann, Hendrik / Katzke, Verena / Cantore, Maurizio / Mambrini, Andrea / Oliverius, Martin / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Landi, Stefano / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Sciences and Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Visceral Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Second Department of Surgery, Aretaieion Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Massa and Carrara, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Epidemiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Institute for Health Research, Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28913878.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a very aggressive tumor with a five-year survival of less than 6%. Chronic pancreatitis (CP), an inflammatory process in of the pancreas, is a strong risk factor for PDAC. Several genetic polymorphisms have been discovered as susceptibility loci for both CP and PDAC. Since CP and PDAC share a consistent number of epidemiologic risk factors, the aim of this study was to investigate whether specific CP risk loci also contribute to PDAC susceptibility. We selected five common SNPs (rs11988997, rs379742, rs10273639, rs2995271 and rs12688220) that were identified as susceptibility markers for CP and analyzed them in 2,914 PDAC cases, 356 CP cases and 5,596 controls retrospectively collected in the context of the international PANDoRA consortium. We found a weak association between the minor allele of the PRSS1-PRSS2-rs10273639 and an increased risk of developing PDAC (OR

5 Article Radical surgery of oligometastatic pancreatic cancer. 2017

Hackert, T / Niesen, W / Hinz, U / Tjaden, C / Strobel, O / Ulrich, A / Michalski, C W / Büchler, M W. ·Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: markus_buechler@med.uni-heidelberg.de. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #27856064.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In metastatic disease (M1), chemotherapy (expected survival: 6-10 months) is considered the only treatment option. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of curative M1 PDAC resections. METHODS: Prospective data of all patients undergoing primary tumour and metastasis resection for stage IV PDAC during a 12-year period was analysed regarding localisation (liver or distant interaortocaval lymph nodes; ILN), morbidity and survival. Patients were stratified with regard to syn- or metachronous metastases resection. RESULTS: Patients (n = 128) undergoing PDAC and metastases resection (intention-to-treat, oligometastatic stage; liver n = 85; ILN n = 43) were included. Surgical morbidity and 30-day mortality after synchronous resection of M1 tumours were 45% and 2.9%, respectively. Overall median survival after M1 resection was 12.3 months in both groups. Long-term outcome showed a 5-year survival of 8.1% after surgery for both liver metastases and 10.1% following ILN resection. CONCLUSIONS: The present collective is the largest series of resected metastatic PDAC and shows that resection of liver or ILN metastases can be done safely and should be considered as it may be superior to palliative treatment, and it is associated with long-term survival of 10% in selected patients. Further studies to stratify patients for these procedures are warranted.

6 Article Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms within the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B region affect pancreatic cancer risk. 2016

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Gentiluomo, Manuel / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Neoptolemos, John P / Niesen, Willem / Vodicka, Pavel / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gazouli, Maria / Pacetti, Paola / Di Leo, Milena / Ito, Hidemi / Klüter, Harald / Soucek, Pavel / Corbo, Vincenzo / Yamao, Kenji / Hosono, Satoyo / Kaaks, Rudolf / Vashist, Yogesh / Gioffreda, Domenica / Strobel, Oliver / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Dijk, Frederike / Andriulli, Angelo / Ivanauskas, Audrius / Bugert, Peter / Tavano, Francesca / Vodickova, Ludmila / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Lovecek, Martin / Landi, Stefano / Key, Timothy J / Boggi, Ugo / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Mambrini, Andrea / Bambi, Franco / Busch, Olivier / Pazienza, Valerio / Valente, Roberto / Theodoropoulos, George E / Hackert, Thilo / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Pasquali, Claudio / Basso, Daniela / Sperti, Cosimo / Matsuo, Keitaro / Büchler, Markus / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Izbicki, Jakob / Costello, Eithne / Katzke, Verena / Michalski, Christoph / Stepien, Anna / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Science, Prague, Czech Republic. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Oncological Department Massa Carrara Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Carrara, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg - Hessen gGmbH, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · ARC-Net Research Centre, and Department of Diagnostics and Public Health University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery I, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Unit Nuffield Department of Population Health University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Dant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Colorectal Unit, First Department of Propaedeutic Surgery, Athens Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology-DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Laboratory of Clinical, Transplant Immunology and Genetics, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27486979.

ABSTRACT: The CDKN2A (p16) gene plays a key role in pancreatic cancer etiology. It is one of the most commonly somatically mutated genes in pancreatic cancer, rare germline mutations have been found to be associated with increased risk of developing familiar pancreatic cancer and CDKN2A promoter hyper-methylation has been suggested to play a critical role both in pancreatic cancer onset and prognosis. In addition several unrelated SNPs in the 9p21.3 region, that includes the CDNK2A, CDNK2B and the CDNK2B-AS1 genes, are associated with the development of cancer in various organs. However, association between the common genetic variability in this region and pancreatic cancer risk is not clearly understood. We sought to fill this gap in a case-control study genotyping 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2,857 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients and 6,111 controls in the context of the Pancreatic Disease Research (PANDoRA) consortium. We found that the A allele of the rs3217992 SNP was associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (ORhet=1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.27, p=0.026, ORhom=1.30, 95% CI 1.12-1.51, p=0.00049). This pleiotropic variant is reported to be a mir-SNP that, by changing the binding site of one or more miRNAs, could influence the normal cell cycle progression and in turn increase PDAC risk. In conclusion, we observed a novel association in a pleiotropic region that has been found to be of key relevance in the susceptibility to various types of cancer and diabetes suggesting that the CDKN2A/B locus could represent a genetic link between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk.