Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Christina C. Newton
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Christina C. Newton wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Circulating Leptin and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Pooled Analysis From 3 Cohorts. 2015

Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Newton, Christina C / Silverman, Debra T / Pollak, Michael / Nogueira, Leticia M / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Albanes, Demetrius / Männistö, Satu / Jacobs, Eric J. · ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #26085045.

ABSTRACT: Adiposity is associated with pancreatic cancer; however, the underlying mechanism(s) is uncertain. Leptin is an adipokine involved in metabolic regulation, and obese individuals have higher concentrations. We conducted a pooled, nested case-control study of cohort participants from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, and the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort to investigate whether prediagnostic serum leptin was associated with pancreatic cancer. A total of 731 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases that occurred between 1986 and 2010 were included (maximum follow-up, 23 years). Incidence density-selected controls (n = 909) were matched to cases by cohort, age, sex, race, and blood draw date. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Sex-specific quintiles were based on the distribution of the controls. Overall, serum leptin was not associated with pancreatic cancer (quintile 5 vs. quintile 1: odds ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval: 0.75, 1.71; Ptrend = 0.38). There was a significant interaction by follow-up time (P = 0.003), such that elevated risk was apparent only during follow-up of more than 10 years after blood draw (quintile 5 vs. quintile 1: odds ratio = 2.55, 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 5.27; Ptrend = 0.004). Our results support an association between increasing leptin concentration and pancreatic cancer; however, long follow-up is necessary to observe the relationship. Subclinical disease may explain the lack of association during early follow-up.

2 Article The Association of Body Mass Index with Pancreatic Cancer: Variation by Age at Body Mass Index Assessment. 2019

Jacobs, Eric J / Newton, Christina C / Patel, Alpa V / Stevens, Victoria L / Islami, Farhad / Flanders, W Dana / Gapstur, Susan M. ·Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Group, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Rolins School of Public Health. Emory Univesity, Atlanta, GA. ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #31647510.

ABSTRACT: Higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer in epidemiologic studies but BMI has usually been assessed at older ages, potentially underestimating the full impact of excess weight. We examined the association between BMI and pancreatic cancer mortality among 963,317 adults aged 30-89 years at enrollment into Cancer Prevention Study-II in 1982. During follow-up through 2014, 8,354 participants died of pancreatic cancer. Hazard ratios (HRs) per 5 BMI-units, calculated using proportional hazards regression, declined steadily with age at BMI assessment, from 1.25 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18, 1.33) in those aged 30-49 at enrollment to 1.13 (95% CI 1.02, 1.26) in those aged 70-89 (p-trend=0.005). Based on a HR of 1.25 per 5 BMI-units at age 45, we estimate 28% of US pancreatic cancer deaths in those born from 1970-74 will be attributable to BMI>25, nearly twice the equivalent proportion in those born in the 1930s, a birth cohort with much lower BMI in middle age. These results suggest BMI before age 50 is more strongly associated with pancreatic cancer risk than BMI at older ages and underscore the importance of avoiding excess weight gain before middle age for preventing this highly fatal cancer.

3 Article The Association of Body Mass Index with Pancreatic Cancer: Variation by Age at Body Mass Index Assessment. 2019

Jacobs, Eric J / Newton, Christina C / Patel, Alpa V / Stevens, Victoria L / Islami, Farhad / Flanders, W Dana / Gapstur, Susan M. ·Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Group, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Rolins School of Public Health. Emory Univesity, Atlanta, GA. ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #31602476.

ABSTRACT: Higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer in epidemiologic studies but BMI has usually been assessed at older ages, potentially underestimating the full impact of excess weight. We examined the association between BMI and pancreatic cancer mortality among 963,317 adults aged 30-89 years at enrollment into Cancer Prevention Study-II in 1982. During follow-up through 2014, 8,354 participants died of pancreatic cancer. Hazard ratios (HRs) per 5 BMI-units, calculated using proportional hazards regression, declined steadily with age at BMI assessment, from 1.25 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18, 1.33) in those aged 30-49 at enrollment to 1.13 (95% CI 1.02, 1.26) in those aged 70-89 (p-trend=0.005). Based on a HR of 1.25 per 5 BMI-units at age 45, we estimate 28% of US pancreatic cancer deaths in those born from 1970-74 will be attributable to BMI≥25, nearly twice the equivalent proportion in those born in the 1930s, a birth cohort with much lower BMI in middle age. These results suggest BMI before age 50 is more strongly associated with pancreatic cancer risk than BMI at older ages and underscore the importance of avoiding excess weight gain before middle age for preventing this highly fatal cancer.

4 Article Serum C-peptide, Total and High Molecular Weight Adiponectin, and Pancreatic Cancer: Do Associations Differ by Smoking? 2017

Nogueira, Leticia M / Newton, Christina C / Pollak, Michael / Silverman, Debra T / Albanes, Demetrius / Männistö, Satu / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Jacobs, Eric J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Texas Cancer Registry, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Rockville, Rockville, Maryland. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta Georgia. · Department of Oncology, Lady Davis Research Institute of the Jewish General Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta Georgia. rs221z@nih.gov Eric.jacobs@cancer.org. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Rockville, Rockville, Maryland. rs221z@nih.gov Eric.jacobs@cancer.org. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #28096201.

ABSTRACT:

5 Article Serum transforming growth factor-β1 and risk of pancreatic cancer in three prospective cohort studies. 2014

Jacobs, Eric J / Newton, Christina C / Silverman, Debra T / Nogueira, Leticia M / Albanes, Demetrius / Männistö, Satu / Pollak, Michael / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, National Home Office, 250 Williams Street, Atlanta, GA, 30303-1002, USA, ejacobs@cancer.org. ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #24913781.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Clinically evident chronic pancreatitis is a strong risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A small Japanese cohort study previously reported that pre-diagnostic serum transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) concentration, a potential marker of subclinical pancreatic inflammation, was associated with higher risk of pancreatic cancer. We further explored this association in a larger prospective study. METHODS: Serum TGF-β1 concentrations were measured in pre-diagnostic samples from 729 pancreatic cancer cases and 907 matched controls from a cohort of Finnish male smokers (the Alpa-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Cancer Prevention Study) and two cohorts of US men and women, the Cancer Prevention Study-II and the Prostate Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Overall, serum TGF-β1 concentration was not associated with a clear increase in pancreatic cancer risk (OR 1.36, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.98-1.88 for highest vs. lowest quintile, p trend = 0.20). However, this association differed significantly by follow-up time (p = 0.02). Serum TGF-β1 concentration was not associated with risk during the first 10 years of follow-up, but was associated with higher risk during follow-up after 10 years (OR 2.13, 95 % CI 1.23-3.68 for highest vs. lowest quintile, p trend = 0.001). During follow-up after 10 years, serum TGF-β1 was associated with higher risk only in the ATBC cohort, although most subjects were from ATBC during this time period and statistical evidence for heterogeneity across cohorts was limited (p = 0.14). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that high serum TGF-β1 may be associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer although a long follow-up period may be needed to observe this association.

6 Article Jewish ethnicity and pancreatic cancer mortality in a large U.S. cohort. 2011

Eldridge, Ronald C / Gapstur, Susan M / Newton, Christina C / Goodman, Michael / Patel, Alpa V / Jacobs, Eric J. ·Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. reldrid@emory.edu ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #21278327.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: An association between Jewish ethnicity and pancreatic cancer risk was suggested by analyses comparing pancreatic cancer mortality rates between Jews and non-Jews in New York in the 1950s. These analyses lacked information on potential confounding factors and the association between Jewish ethnicity and pancreatic cancer has not been examined in any contemporary U.S. population or in any cohort study. METHODS: We examined the association between Jewish ethnicity and pancreatic cancer mortality among approximately 1 million participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II cohort. Participants completed a questionnaire at enrollment in 1982 which included information on religion, smoking, obesity, and diabetes. During follow-up through 2006, there were 6,727 pancreatic cancer deaths, including 480 among Jewish participants. Proportional hazards modeling was used to calculate multivariable rate ratios (RR). RESULTS: After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, body mass index, and diabetes, pancreatic cancer mortality was higher among Jewish participants than among non-Jewish whites (RR = 1.43; 95% CI, 1.30-1.57). In analyses by birthplace, RRs were 1.59 (95% CI, 1.31-1.93) for North American-born Jews with North American-born parents, 1.43 (95% CI, 1.27-1.61) for North American-born Jews with 1 or more parents born outside North America, and 1.03 (0.73, 1.44) for Jews born outside North America (P(heterogeneity) = 0.07). CONCLUSIONS: These results support a higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer among U.S. Jews that is not explained by established risk factors. IMPACT: Future studies may clarify the role of specific environmental or genetic factors responsible for higher risk among U.S. Jews.

7 Article Family history of cancer and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan). 2010

Jacobs, Eric J / Chanock, Stephen J / Fuchs, Charles S / Lacroix, Andrea / McWilliams, Robert R / Steplowski, Emily / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Agalliu, Ilir / Allen, Naomi E / Amundadottir, Laufey / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Clipp, Sandra / Dorronsoro, Miren / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hankinson, Susan E / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Hunter, David J / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Kraft, Peter / Kooperberg, Charles / Lynch, Shannon M / Sund, Malin / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Mouw, Tracy / Newton, Christina C / Overvad, Kim / Palli, Domenico / Peeters, Petra H M / Rajkovic, Aleksandar / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Thomas, Gilles / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne. ·Department of Epidemiology, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, USA. ejacobs@cancer.org ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #20049842.

ABSTRACT: A family history of pancreatic cancer has consistently been associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, uncertainty remains about the strength of this association. Results from previous studies suggest a family history of select cancers (i.e., ovarian, breast and colorectal) could also be associated, although not as strongly, with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We examined the association between a family history of 5 types of cancer (pancreas, prostate, ovarian, breast and colorectal) and risk of pancreatic cancer using data from a collaborative nested case-control study conducted by the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium. Cases and controls were from cohort studies from the United States, Europe and China, and a case-control study from the Mayo Clinic. Analyses of family history of pancreatic cancer included 1,183 cases and 1,205 controls. A family history of pancreatic cancer in a parent, sibling or child was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer [multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) = 1.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-2.61]. A family history of prostate cancer was also associated with increased risk (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.12-1.89). There were no statistically significant associations with a family history of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.52-1.31), breast cancer (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 0.97-1.51) or colorectal cancer (OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.93-1.47). Our results confirm a moderate sized association between a family history of pancreatic cancer and risk of pancreatic cancer and also provide evidence for an association with a family history of prostate cancer worth further study.