Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Yusuke Nakamura
Based on 11 articles published since 2010
(Why 11 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Yusuke Nakamura wrote the following 11 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial The vitamin D receptor gene as a determinant of survival in pancreatic cancer patients: Genomic analysis and experimental validation. 2018

Innocenti, Federico / Owzar, Kouros / Jiang, Chen / Etheridge, Amy S / Gordân, Raluca / Sibley, Alexander B / Mulkey, Flora / Niedzwiecki, Donna / Glubb, Dylan / Neel, Nicole / Talamonti, Mark S / Bentrem, David J / Seiser, Eric / Yeh, Jen Jen / Van Loon, Katherine / McLeod, Howard / Ratain, Mark J / Kindler, Hedy L / Venook, Alan P / Nakamura, Yusuke / Kubo, Michiaki / Petersen, Gloria M / Bamlet, William R / McWilliams, Robert R. ·UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America. · Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America. · Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America. · North Shore University Health System, Evanston, IL, United States of America. · Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, United States of America. · University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States of America. · Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, United States of America. · University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States of America. · Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Yokohama, Japan. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #30107003.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Advanced pancreatic cancer is a highly refractory disease almost always associated with survival of little more than a year. New interventions based on novel targets are needed. We aim to identify new genetic determinants of overall survival (OS) in patients after treatment with gemcitabine using genome-wide screens of germline DNA. We aim also to support these findings with in vitro functional analysis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Genome-wide screens of germline DNA in two independent cohorts of pancreatic cancer patients (from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 80303 and the Mayo Clinic) were used to select new genes associated with OS. The vitamin D receptor gene (VDR) was selected, and the interactions of genetic variation in VDR with circulating vitamin D levels and gemcitabine treatment were evaluated. Functional effects of common VDR variants were also evaluated in experimental assays in human cell lines. RESULTS: The rs2853564 variant in VDR was associated with OS in patients from both the Mayo Clinic (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.70-0.94, p = 0.0059) and CALGB 80303 (HR 0.74, 0.63-0.87, p = 0.0002). rs2853564 interacted with high pre-treatment levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D, a measure of endogenous vitamin D) (p = 0.0079 for interaction) and with gemcitabine treatment (p = 0.024 for interaction) to confer increased OS. rs2853564 increased transcriptional activity in luciferase assays and reduced the binding of the IRF4 transcription factor. CONCLUSION: Our findings propose VDR as a novel determinant of survival in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. Common functional variation in this gene might interact with endogenous vitamin D and gemcitabine treatment to determine improved patient survival. These results support evidence for a modulatory role of the vitamin D pathway for the survival of advanced pancreatic cancer patients.

2 Clinical Trial Predictive biomarkers for the efficacy of peptide vaccine treatment: based on the results of a phase II study on advanced pancreatic cancer. 2017

Shindo, Yoshitaro / Hazama, Shoichi / Suzuki, Nobuaki / Iguchi, Haruo / Uesugi, Kazuhiro / Tanaka, Hiroaki / Aruga, Atsushi / Hatori, Takashi / Ishizaki, Hidenobu / Umeda, Yuzo / Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi / Ikemoto, Tetsuya / Shimada, Mitsuo / Yoshimatsu, Kazuhiko / Takenouchi, Hiroko / Matsui, Hiroto / Kanekiyo, Shinsuke / Iida, Michihisa / Koki, Yasunobu / Arima, Hideki / Furukawa, Hiroyuki / Ueno, Tomio / Yoshino, Shigefumi / Fujita, Tomonobu / Kawakami, Yutaka / Nakamura, Yusuke / Oka, Masaaki / Nagano, Hiroaki. ·Department of Gastroenterological, Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minami-Kogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi, 755-8505, Japan. · Department of Translational Research and Developmental Therapeutics against Cancer, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, Ube, Japan. · Clinical Research Center, Shikoku Cancer Center, NHO., Matsuyama, Japan. · Department of Surgical Oncology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. · Institute of Gastroenterology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Surgical Oncology and Regulation of Organ Function, Miyazaki University School of Medicine, Miyazaki, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Okayama, Japan. · Department of Digestive and Transplant Surgery, Tokushima University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokushima, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Tokyo Women's Medical University Medical Center East, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Pharmacy, Yamaguchi University Hospital, Ube, Japan. · Division of Cellular Signaling, Institute for Advanced Medical Research, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. · Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterological, Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minami-Kogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi, 755-8505, Japan. hnagano@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp. ·J Exp Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #28241889.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The purpose of the present study was to explore novel biomarkers that can predict the clinical outcome of patients before treatment or during vaccination. These would be useful for the selection of appropriate patients who would be expected to exhibit better treatment outcomes from vaccination, and for facilitating the development of cancer vaccine treatments. METHODS: From a single-arm, non-randomized, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A-status-blind phase II trial of a vaccine treatment using three HLA-A*2402-restricted peptides for advanced pancreatic cancer (PC), we obtained peripheral blood samples from 36 patients of an HLA-A*2402-matched group and 27 patients of an HLA-A*2402-unmatched group. RESULTS: Multivariate analysis (HR = 2.546; 95% CI = 1.138 to 5.765; p = 0.0231) and log-rank test (p = 0.0036) showed that a high expression level of programmed death-1 (PD-1) on CD4+ T cells was a negative predictive biomarker of overall survival in the HLA-A*2402-matched group . Moreover, a high expression level of PD-1 on CD4+ T cells was a negative predictor for the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (p = 0.0007). After treatment, we found that the upregulation of PD-1 and T cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (Tim-3) expression on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was significantly associated with a poor clinical outcome in the HLA-A*2402-matched group (p = 0.0330, 0.0282, 0.0046, and 0.0068, respectively). In contrast, there was no significant difference for these factors in the HLA-A*2402-unmatched group. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the upregulation of PD-1 and Tim-3 expression on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells may restrict T cell responses in advanced PC patients; therefore, combination immunotherapy with blockade of PD-1 and Tim-3 to restore T cell responses may be a potential therapeutic approach for advanced PC patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical-Trail-Registration: UMIN000008082 .

3 Clinical Trial Phase II clinical trial of peptide cocktail therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: VENUS-PC study. 2017

Suzuki, Nobuaki / Hazama, Shoichi / Iguchi, Haruo / Uesugi, Kazuhiro / Tanaka, Hiroaki / Hirakawa, Kosei / Aruga, Atsushi / Hatori, Takashi / Ishizaki, Hidenobu / Umeda, Yuzo / Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi / Ikemoto, Tetsuya / Shimada, Mitsuo / Yoshimatsu, Kazuhiko / Shimizu, Ryoichi / Hayashi, Hiroto / Sakata, Koichiro / Takenouchi, Hiroko / Matsui, Hiroto / Shindo, Yoshitaro / Iida, Michihisa / Koki, Yasunobu / Arima, Hideki / Furukawa, Hiroyuki / Ueno, Tomio / Yoshino, Shigefumi / Nakamura, Yusuke / Oka, Masaaki / Nagano, Hiroaki. ·Department of Gastroenterological, Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Japan. · Clinical Research Center, Shikoku Cancer Center, NHO, Matsuyama, Japan. · Department of Surgical Oncology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. · Institute of Gastroenterology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Surgical Oncology and Regulation of Organ Function, Miyazaki University School of Medicine, Miyazaki, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Okayama, Japan. · Department of Digestive and Transplant Surgery, Tokushima University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokushima, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Tokyo Women's Medical University Medical Center East, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Ogori Dai-ichi General Hospital, Yamaguchi, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Kanmon Medical Center, NHO, Shimonoseki, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Shimonoseki Medical Center, JCHO, Shimonoseki, Japan. · Department of Pharmacy, Yamaguchi University Hospital, Ube, Japan. · Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi, Japan. ·Cancer Sci · Pubmed #27783849.

ABSTRACT: We previously conducted a phase I clinical trial combining the HLA-A*2402-restricted KIF20A-derived peptide vaccine with gemcitabine for advanced pancreatic cancer (PC) and confirmed its safety and immunogenicity in cancer patients. In this study, we conducted a multicenter, single-armed, phase II trial using two antiangiogenic cancer vaccines targeting VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 in addition to the KIF20A peptide. We attempted to evaluate the clinical benefit of the cancer vaccination in combination with gemcitabine. Chemotherapy naïve PC patients were enrolled to evaluate primarily the 1-year survival rate, and secondarily overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), response rate (RR), disease control rate (DCR) and the peptide-specific immune responses. All enrolled patients received therapy without the HLA-A information, and the HLA genotypes were used for classification of the patients. Between June 2012 and May 2013, a total of 68 patients were enrolled. No severe systemic adverse effects of Grade 3 or higher related to these three peptides were observed. The 1-year survival rates between the HLA-A*2402-matched and -unmatched groups were not significantly different. In the HLA-A*2402 matched group, patients showing peptide-specific CTL induction for KIF20A or VEGFR1 showed a better prognosis compared to those without such induction (P = 0.023, P = 0.009, respectively). In the HLA-A*2402-matched group, the patients who showed a strong injection site reaction had a better survival rate (P = 0.017) compared to those with a weak or no injection site reaction. This phase II study demonstrated that this therapeutic peptide cocktail might be effective in patients who demonstrate peptide-specific immune reactions although predictive biomarkers are needed for patient selection in its further clinical application.

4 Article Overexpression of C16orf74 is involved in aggressive pancreatic cancers. 2017

Nakamura, Toru / Katagiri, Toyomasa / Sato, Shoki / Kushibiki, Toshihiro / Hontani, Koji / Tsuchikawa, Takahiro / Hirano, Satoshi / Nakamura, Yusuke. ·Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery II, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan. · Division of Genome Medicine, Institute for Genome Research, The University of Tokushima, Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima, Japan. · Department of Medicine and Surgery, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #28881575.

ABSTRACT: Clinical outcome of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has not been improved in the last three decades due to the lack of effective molecular-targeted drugs. To identify a novel therapeutic target for PDAC, we have performed genome-wide anamysis and found that

5 Article Morphological Changes, Cadherin Switching, and Growth Suppression in Pancreatic Cancer by GALNT6 Knockdown. 2016

Tarhan, Yunus Emre / Kato, Taigo / Jang, Miran / Haga, Yoshimi / Ueda, Koji / Nakamura, Yusuke / Park, Jae-Hyun. ·Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. · Cancer Proteomics Group, Genome Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, 135-8550, Japan. · Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA; Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. Electronic address: ynakamura@bsd.uchicago.edu. ·Neoplasia · Pubmed #27237318.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer reveals the worst prognosis among human cancers with little improvement in its clinical outcome in the last three decades. We previously suggested that polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 6 (GALNT6), which catalyzes O-type glycosylation of Mucin 1, might be a promising molecular target for drug development for breast cancer. In this study, we report upregulation of GALNT6 in pancreatic cancer cells where Mucin proteins are highly O-glycosylated. We found that knockdown of GALNT6 with small interfering RNA in pancreatic cancer cells decreased the amount of Mucin 4 protein as well as that of its transcript, reduced the levels of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and significantly reduced pancreatic cancer cell viability. Interestingly, knockdown of GALNT6 caused drastic morphological changes of pancreatic cells, accompanied with the cadherin switching from P-cadherin to E-cadherin. Considering important roles of Mucin 4 in growth and invasion, our findings imply that targeting GALNT6 is a very promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer patients who still have very limited treatment modalities.

6 Article Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2014

Wolpin, Brian M / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Kraft, Peter / Kooperberg, Charles / Petersen, Gloria M / Wang, Zhaoming / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Canzian, Federico / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Jacobs, Eric J / Kamineni, Aruna / Klein, Alison P / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Li, Donghui / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Risch, Harvey A / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Austin, Melissa A / Barfield, Richard / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Brotzman, Michelle / Büchler, Markus W / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Bugert, Peter / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Chung, Charles / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Funel, Niccola / Gaziano, J Michael / Giese, Nathalia A / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gorman, Megan J / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Henderson, Brian E / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Innocenti, Federico / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / LaCroix, Andrea / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Nakamura, Yusuke / Oberg, Ann L / Owzar, Kouros / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Piepoli, Ada / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Taylor, Philip R / Theodoropoulos, George E / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Wu, Chen / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles / Chanock, Stephen J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2]. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2]. · 1] Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. [2]. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2] Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · 1] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [2] Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [3] New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · 1] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · The Cancer Research Center of Hawaii (retired), Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2] Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 1] Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. [2] Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy. · 1] INSERM, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, Villejuif, France. [2] University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France. [3] Institut Gustave Roussy (IGR), Villejuif, France. · Westat, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg-Hessen, Mannheim, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · 1] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [3] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Prevention and Research Center, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Prevention, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · 1] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · The University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Center for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · 1] Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. [2] Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. [3] Department of Nutrition, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · 1] Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · 1] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Epidemiology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', Opera di Padre Pio da Pietrelcina, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · 1] Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. [2] Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. [3] CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · 1] Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. [2] Departament de Ciències i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Toxicogenomics Unit, Center for Toxicology and Safety, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · 1st Propaideutic Surgical Department, Hippocration University Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. [3] Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [2] New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2]. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2] Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. [3]. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #25086665.

ABSTRACT: We performed a multistage genome-wide association study including 7,683 individuals with pancreatic cancer and 14,397 controls of European descent. Four new loci reached genome-wide significance: rs6971499 at 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT, per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-0.84, P = 3.0 × 10(-12)), rs7190458 at 16q23.1 (BCAR1/CTRB1/CTRB2, OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.30-1.65, P = 1.1 × 10(-10)), rs9581943 at 13q12.2 (PDX1, OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.10-1.20, P = 2.4 × 10(-9)) and rs16986825 at 22q12.1 (ZNRF3, OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.12-1.25, P = 1.2 × 10(-8)). We identified an independent signal in exon 2 of TERT at the established region 5p15.33 (rs2736098, OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.76-0.85, P = 9.8 × 10(-14)). We also identified a locus at 8q24.21 (rs1561927, P = 1.3 × 10(-7)) that approached genome-wide significance located 455 kb telomeric of PVT1. Our study identified multiple new susceptibility alleles for pancreatic cancer that are worthy of follow-up studies.

7 Article Reevaluation of a lectin antibody ELISA kit for measuring fucosylated haptoglobin in various conditions. 2013

Kamada, Yoshihiro / Kinoshita, Noriaki / Tsuchiya, Yoko / Kobayashi, Kyoko / Fujii, Hironobu / Terao, Naoko / Kamihagi, Kyoko / Koyama, Nobuto / Yamada, Shin / Daigo, Yataro / Nakamura, Yusuke / Taniguchi, Naoyuki / Miyoshi, Eiji. ·Department of Molecular Biochemistry and Clinical Investigation, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine 1-7, Yamada-oka, Suita 565-0871, Japan. ·Clin Chim Acta · Pubmed #23262369.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Fucosylated haptoglobin (Fuc-Hpt) is a novel cancer biomarker in a variety of pathological conditions. We previously found that the level of Fuc-Hpt is increased in the sera of patients with pancreatic cancer, and established a lectin antibody ELISA using Aleuria aurantia lectin, which specifically binds to fucosylated residues on oligosaccharides. METHODS: To apply this assay system to the clinical detection of several diseases, several assay conditions such as serum dilutions and inhibitory factors were investigated. The Fuc-Hpt kit was available for 25-625 fold serum dilution. RESULTS: While the values of Fuc-Hpt assay using sera and plasma were different, they showed positive correlation. The addition of bilirubin and formagine did not influence on Fuc-Hpt assay, but hemoglobin inhibited this assay in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS: We reevaluated this lectin antibody ELISA kit for measuring fucosylated haptoglobin in various conditions in this study.

8 Article A genome-wide association study of overall survival in pancreatic cancer patients treated with gemcitabine in CALGB 80303. 2012

Innocenti, Federico / Owzar, Kouros / Cox, Nancy L / Evans, Patrick / Kubo, Michiaki / Zembutsu, Hitoshi / Jiang, Chen / Hollis, Donna / Mushiroda, Taisei / Li, Liang / Friedman, Paula / Wang, Liewei / Glubb, Dylan / Hurwitz, Herbert / Giacomini, Kathleen M / McLeod, Howard L / Goldberg, Richard M / Schilsky, Richard L / Kindler, Hedy L / Nakamura, Yusuke / Ratain, Mark J. ·Department of Medicine, Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB), University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #22142827.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Cancer and Leukemia Group B 80303 was a randomized, phase III study in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer treated with gemcitabine plus either bevacizumab or placebo. We prospectively collected germline DNA and conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using overall survival (OS) as the endpoint. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: DNA from 351 patients was genotyped for more than 550,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Associations between OS and SNPs were investigated using the log-linear 2-way multiplicative Cox proportional hazards model. The subset of 294 genetically European patients was used for the primary analysis. RESULTS: A nonsynonymous SNP in interleukin (IL)17F (rs763780, H161R) and an intronic SNP in strong linkage disequilibrium (rs7771466) were associated with OS using genome-wide criteria (P ≤ 10(-7)). Median OS was significantly shorter (P = 2.61 × 10(-8)) for the rs763780 heterozygotes [3.1 months; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.3-4.3] than for the patients without this variant (6.8 months; 95% CI, 5.8-7.3). After adjustment by stratification factors, the P value for the association was 9.51 × 10(-7). CONCLUSIONS: The variant 161R form of IL-17F is a natural antagonist of the antiangiogenic effects of wild-type 161H IL-17F, and angiogenesis may play an important role in the metastatic spread of pancreatic cancer. In this preliminary study, we hypothesize that the angiogenetic potential of pancreatic cancers in patients with variant IL-17F is higher than that of tumors in patients with wild-type IL-17F, conferring worse prognosis. This exploratory GWAS may provide the foundation for testing the biology and clinical effects of novel genes and their heritable variants through mechanistic and confirmatory studies in pancreatic cancer.

9 Article C12orf48, termed PARP-1 binding protein, enhances poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activity and protects pancreatic cancer cells from DNA damage. 2011

Piao, Lianhua / Nakagawa, Hidewaki / Ueda, Koji / Chung, Suyoun / Kashiwaya, Kotoe / Eguchi, Hidetoshi / Ohigashi, Hiroaki / Ishikawa, Osamu / Daigo, Yataro / Matsuda, Koichi / Nakamura, Yusuke. ·Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. ·Genes Chromosomes Cancer · Pubmed #20931645.

ABSTRACT: To identify novel therapeutic targets for aggressive and therapy-resistant pancreatic cancer, we had previously performed expression profile analysis of pancreatic cancers using microarrays and found dozens of genes trans-activated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. Among them, this study focused on the characterization of a novel gene C12orf48 whose overexpression in PDAC cells was validated by Northern blot and immunohistochemical analysis. Its overexpression was observed in other aggressive and therapy-resistant malignancies as well. Knockdown of C12orf48 by siRNA in PDAC cells significantly suppressed their growth. Importantly, we demonstrated that C12orf48 protein could directly interact with Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1), one of the essential proteins in the repair of DNA damage, and positively regulate the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation activity of PARP-1. Depletion of C12orf48 sensitized PDAC cells to agents causing DNA damage and also enhanced DNA damage-induced G2/M arrest through reduction of PARP-1 enzymatic activities. Hence, our findings implicate C12orf48, termed PARP-1 binding protein (PARPBP), or its interaction with PARP-1 to be a potential molecular target for development of selective therapy for pancreatic cancer.

10 Article Genome-wide association study of pancreatic cancer in Japanese population. 2010

Low, Siew-Kee / Kuchiba, Aya / Zembutsu, Hitoshi / Saito, Akira / Takahashi, Atsushi / Kubo, Michiaki / Daigo, Yataro / Kamatani, Naoyuki / Chiku, Suenori / Totsuka, Hirohiko / Ohnami, Sumiko / Hirose, Hiroshi / Shimada, Kazuaki / Okusaka, Takuji / Yoshida, Teruhiko / Nakamura, Yusuke / Sakamoto, Hiromi. ·Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, Department of Medical Genome Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Scineces, the University of Tokyo, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #20686608.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer shows very poor prognosis and is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in Japan. Previous studies indicated some genetic factors contributing to the development and progression of pancreatic cancer; however, there are limited reports for common genetic variants to be associated with this disease, especially in the Asian population. We have conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using 991 invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases and 5,209 controls, and identified three loci showing significant association (P-value<5x10(-7)) with susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. The SNPs that showed significant association carried estimated odds ratios of 1.29, 1.32, and 3.73 with 95% confidence intervals of 1.17-1.43, 1.19-1.47, and 2.24-6.21; P-value of 3.30x10(-7), 3.30x10(-7), and 4.41x10(-7); located on chromosomes 6p25.3, 12p11.21 and 7q36.2, respectively. These associated SNPs are located within linkage disequilibrium blocks containing genes that have been implicated some roles in the oncogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

11 Article Involvement of the tubulin tyrosine ligase-like family member 4 polyglutamylase in PELP1 polyglutamylation and chromatin remodeling in pancreatic cancer cells. 2010

Kashiwaya, Kotoe / Nakagawa, Hidewaki / Hosokawa, Masayo / Mochizuki, Yasuo / Ueda, Koji / Piao, Lianhua / Chung, Suyoun / Hamamoto, Ryuji / Eguchi, Hidetoshi / Ohigashi, Hiroaki / Ishikawa, Osamu / Janke, Carsten / Shinomura, Yasuhisa / Nakamura, Yusuke. ·Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #20442285.

ABSTRACT: Polyglutamylation is a new class of posttranslational modification in which glutamate side chains are formed in proteins, although its biological significance is not well known. Through our genome-wide gene expression profile analyses of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, we identified the overexpression of tubulin tyrosine ligase-like family member 4 (TTLL4) in PDAC cells. Subsequent reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot analyses confirmed its upregulation in several PDACs. TTLL4 belongs to the TTLL family which was reported to have polyglutamylase activity. Knockdown of TTLL4 by short hairpin RNA in PDAC cells attenuated the growth of PDAC cells and exogenous introduction of TTLL4 enhanced cell growth. We also found that TTLL4 expression was correlated with polyglutamylation levels of a glutamate stretch region of the proline, glutamate, and leucine-rich protein 1 (PELP1) that was shown to interact with various proteins such as histone H3, and was involved in several signaling pathways through its function as a scaffold protein. PELP1 polyglutamylation could influence its interaction with histone H3 and affect histone H3 acetylation. We also identified the interaction of PELP1 with LAS1L and SENP3, components of the MLL1-WDR5 supercomplex involving chromatin remodeling. Our findings imply that TTLL4 could play important roles in pancreatic carcinogenesis through its polyglutamylase activity and subsequent coordination of chromatin remodeling, and might be a good molecular candidate for the development of new therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer.