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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Eric K. Nakakura
Based on 10 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Eric K. Nakakura wrote the following 10 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, Version 2.2017, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2017

Tempero, Margaret A / Malafa, Mokenge P / Al-Hawary, Mahmoud / Asbun, Horacio / Bain, Andrew / Behrman, Stephen W / Benson, Al B / Binder, Ellen / Cardin, Dana B / Cha, Charles / Chiorean, E Gabriela / Chung, Vincent / Czito, Brian / Dillhoff, Mary / Dotan, Efrat / Ferrone, Cristina R / Hardacre, Jeffrey / Hawkins, William G / Herman, Joseph / Ko, Andrew H / Komanduri, Srinadh / Koong, Albert / LoConte, Noelle / Lowy, Andrew M / Moravek, Cassadie / Nakakura, Eric K / O'Reilly, Eileen M / Obando, Jorge / Reddy, Sushanth / Scaife, Courtney / Thayer, Sarah / Weekes, Colin D / Wolff, Robert A / Wolpin, Brian M / Burns, Jennifer / Darlow, Susan. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #28784865.

ABSTRACT: Ductal adenocarcinoma and its variants account for most pancreatic malignancies. High-quality multiphase imaging can help to preoperatively distinguish between patients eligible for resection with curative intent and those with unresectable disease. Systemic therapy is used in the neoadjuvant or adjuvant pancreatic cancer setting, as well as in the management of locally advanced unresectable and metastatic disease. Clinical trials are critical for making progress in treatment of pancreatic cancer. The NCCN Guidelines for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma focus on diagnosis and treatment with systemic therapy, radiation therapy, and surgical resection.

2 Guideline Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, version 2.2012: featured updates to the NCCN Guidelines. 2012

Tempero, Margaret A / Arnoletti, J Pablo / Behrman, Stephen W / Ben-Josef, Edgar / Benson, Al B / Casper, Ephraim S / Cohen, Steven J / Czito, Brian / Ellenhorn, Joshua D I / Hawkins, William G / Herman, Joseph / Hoffman, John P / Ko, Andrew / Komanduri, Srinadh / Koong, Albert / Ma, Wen Wee / Malafa, Mokenge P / Merchant, Nipun B / Mulvihill, Sean J / Muscarella, Peter / Nakakura, Eric K / Obando, Jorge / Pitman, Martha B / Sasson, Aaron R / Tally, Anitra / Thayer, Sarah P / Whiting, Samuel / Wolff, Robert A / Wolpin, Brian M / Freedman-Cass, Deborah A / Shead, Dorothy A / Anonymous1061005. ·UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #22679115.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma discuss the workup and management of tumors of the exocrine pancreas. These NCCN Guidelines Insights provide a summary and explanation of major changes to the 2012 NCCN Guidelines for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma. The panel made 3 significant updates to the guidelines: 1) more detail was added regarding multiphase CT techniques for diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer, and pancreas protocol MRI was added as an emerging alternative to CT; 2) the use of a fluoropyrimidine plus oxaliplatin (e.g., 5-FU/leucovorin/oxaliplatin or capecitabine/oxaliplatin) was added as an acceptable chemotherapy combination for patients with advanced or metastatic disease and good performance status as a category 2B recommendation; and 3) the panel developed new recommendations concerning surgical technique and pathologic analysis and reporting.

3 Guideline Pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2010

Tempero, Margaret A / Arnoletti, J Pablo / Behrman, Stephen / Ben-Josef, Edgar / Benson, Al B / Berlin, Jordan D / Cameron, John L / Casper, Ephraim S / Cohen, Steven J / Duff, Michelle / Ellenhorn, Joshua D I / Hawkins, William G / Hoffman, John P / Kuvshinoff, Boris W / Malafa, Mokenge P / Muscarella, Peter / Nakakura, Eric K / Sasson, Aaron R / Thayer, Sarah P / Tyler, Douglas S / Warren, Robert S / Whiting, Samuel / Willett, Christopher / Wolff, Robert A / Anonymous3820673. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #20876541.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Challenges Staging Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Pancreas, Jejunum and Ileum, and Appendix. 2018

Nakakura, Eric K. ·Division of General Surgery, Section of Surgical Oncology/Hepatopancreaticobiliary Surgery, Department of Surgery and Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. Eric.Nakakura@ucsf.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #28779367.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review Complicated Case Presentation: Management of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1. 2017

Mulvey, Claire K / Van Loon, Katherine / Bergsland, Emily K / Masharani, Umesh / Nakakura, Eric K. ·From the *Department of Internal Medicine, †Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, ‡Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, and §Section of Surgical Oncology/Hepatopancreaticobiliary Surgery, Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #28187108.

ABSTRACT: Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an inherited predisposition to tumors of the parathyroid glands, anterior pituitary, and pancreatic islet cells. In this review, we discuss the clinical case of a 45-year-old woman with MEN1 that was presented at the 2015 North American Neuroendocrine Tumor Society Symposium. In our review of this patient's complicated clinical course and subsequent operative management, we highlight controversies in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1. In particular, this case illustrates the lack of consensus regarding the optimal biochemical and radiologic screening for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and absence of guidelines about the appropriate surgical approach for treatment. We review these controversies and discuss possible approaches to management.

6 Review Unique patterns of metastases in common and rare types of malignancy. 2011

Leong, Stanley P L / Nakakura, Eric K / Pollock, Raphael / Choti, Michael A / Morton, Donald L / Henner, W David / Lal, Anita / Pillai, Raji / Clark, Orlo H / Cady, Blake. ·Center for Melanoma Research and Treatmnet and Department of Surgery, California Pacific Medical Center and Research Institute, San Francisco, California 94115, USA. leongSX@cpmcri.org ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #21480255.

ABSTRACT: This review on the unique patterns of metastases by common and rare types of cancer addresses regional lymphatic metastases but also demonstrates general principles by consideration of vital organ metastases. These general features of successfully treated metastases are relationships to basic biological behavior as illustrated by disease-free interval, organ-specific behavior, oligo-metastatic presentation, genetic control of the metastatic pattern, careful selection of patients for surgical resection, and the necessity of complete resection of the few patients eligible for long-term survival after resection of vital organ metastasis. Lymph node metastases, while illustrating these general features, are not related to overall survival because lymph node metastases themselves do not destroy a vital organ function, and therefore have no causal relationship to overall survival. When a cancer cell spreads to a regional lymph node, does it also simultaneously spread to the systemic site or sites? Alternatively, does the cancer spread to the regional lymph node first and then it subsequently spreads to the distant site(s) after an incubation period of growth in the lymph node? Of course, if the cancer is in its incubation stage in the lymph node, then removal of the lymph node in the majority of cases with cancer cells may be curative. The data from the sentinel lymph node era, particularly in melanoma and breast cancer, is consistent with the spectrum theory of cancer progression to the sentinel lymph node in the majority of cases prior to distant metastasis. Perhaps, different subsets of cancer may be better defined with relevant biomarkers so that mechanisms of metastasis can be more accurately defined on a molecular and genomic level.

7 Article Preoperative FOLFIRINOX for borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: Is radiation necessary in the modern era of chemotherapy? 2016

Kim, Sunhee S / Nakakura, Eric K / Wang, Zhen J / Kim, Grace E / Corvera, Carlos U / Harris, Hobart W / Kirkwood, Kimberly S / Hirose, Ryutaro / Tempero, Margaret A / Ko, Andrew H. ·Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. · Department of Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. eric.nakakura@ucsf.edu. · Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. · Department of Pathology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. · Department of Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. · Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. andrewko@medicine.ucsf.edu. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #27444658.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: No consensus exists regarding the optimal neoadjuvant treatment paradigm for patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC), including the respective roles of chemotherapy and radiation. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis, including detailed pathologic and radiologic review, of pancreatic cancer patients undergoing FOLFIRINOX, with or without radiation therapy (RT), prior to surgical resection at a high-volume academic center over a 4-year period. RESULTS: Of 26 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 22 (84.6%) received FOLFIRINOX alone without RT (median number of treatment cycles = 9). The majority of patients met formal radiographic criteria for BRPC, with the superior mesenteric vein representing the most common vessel involved. R0 resection rate was 90.9%, with 12 patients (54.5%) requiring vascular reconstruction. Treatment response was classified as moderate or marked in 16 patients (72.7%) according to the College of American Pathologists grading system. Estimated median disease-free and overall survival rates are 22.6 months and not reached (NR), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This is one of the largest series to describe the use of neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX, without radiation therapy, in patients with BRPC undergoing surgical resection. Given the high R0 resection rates and favorable clinical outcomes with chemotherapy alone, this strategy should be further assessed in prospective study design. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:587-596. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

8 Article Pancreatic adenocarcinoma, version 2.2014: featured updates to the NCCN guidelines. 2014

Tempero, Margaret A / Malafa, Mokenge P / Behrman, Stephen W / Benson, Al B / Casper, Ephraim S / Chiorean, E Gabriela / Chung, Vincent / Cohen, Steven J / Czito, Brian / Engebretson, Anitra / Feng, Mary / Hawkins, William G / Herman, Joseph / Hoffman, John P / Ko, Andrew / Komanduri, Srinadh / Koong, Albert / Lowy, Andrew M / Ma, Wen Wee / Merchant, Nipun B / Mulvihill, Sean J / Muscarella, Peter / Nakakura, Eric K / Obando, Jorge / Pitman, Martha B / Reddy, Sushanth / Sasson, Aaron R / Thayer, Sarah P / Weekes, Colin D / Wolff, Robert A / Wolpin, Brian M / Burns, Jennifer L / Freedman-Cass, Deborah A. ·From UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN); University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Stanford Cancer Institute; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; University of Colorado Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #25099441.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma discuss the diagnosis and management of adenocarcinomas of the exocrine pancreas and are intended to assist with clinical decision-making. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points from the 2014 NCCN Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Panel meeting. The panel discussion focused mainly on the management of borderline resectable and locally advanced disease. In particular, the panel discussed the definition of borderline resectable disease, role of neoadjuvant therapy in borderline disease, role of chemoradiation in locally advanced disease, and potential role of newer, more active chemotherapy regimens in both settings.

9 Article Lymph node sampling rates and predictors of nodal metastasis in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor resections: the UCSF experience with 149 patients. 2012

Parekh, Justin R / Wang, Sam C / Bergsland, Emily K / Venook, Alan P / Warren, Robert S / Kim, Grace E / Nakakura, Eric K. ·Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #22781907.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The decision to perform pancreas-preserving procedures or standard resections for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) is often based on the perceived risk of malignancy, including potential nodal involvement. We sought to identify clinicopathological factors that predict nodal disease. METHODS: This is a retrospective review of pathology database for PNET resections from January 1, 1988, to March 15, 2010. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify predictors of nodal metastasis. RESULTS: A total of 149 patients were identified. Enucleations had lower lymph node sampling rates compared to major resections. Excluding enucleations, 23% of patients had no lymph nodes sampled. For patients who did have lymph nodes evaluated, a median of 5 lymph nodes were examined. On multivariate analysis, only distant disease predicted nodal metastasis (odds ratio = 3.80, P = 0.02); tumor size did not (P = 0.48). One third of patients with lymph node metastasis had tumors less than 3 cm. CONCLUSIONS: Lymph nodes are not evaluated in many major pancreatic resections for PNET, and preoperative prediction of nodal metastasis is difficult, even when tumor size is considered. Consequently, many patients may be understaged and undergo potentially inadequate resection. Inconsistent lymph node sampling may explain conflicting conclusions in the literature regarding the prognostic value of lymph node involvement in PNET patients.

10 Article MicroRNA dynamics in the stages of tumorigenesis correlate with hallmark capabilities of cancer. 2009

Olson, Peter / Lu, Jun / Zhang, Hao / Shai, Anny / Chun, Matthew G / Wang, Yucheng / Libutti, Steven K / Nakakura, Eric K / Golub, Todd R / Hanahan, Douglas. ·Diabetes Center, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143, USA. ·Genes Dev · Pubmed #19759263.

ABSTRACT: While altered expression of microRNAs (miRs) in tumors has been well documented, it remains unclear how the miR transcriptome intersects neoplastic progression. By profiling the miR transcriptome we identified miR expression signatures associated with steps in tumorigenesis and the acquisition of hallmark capabilities in a prototypical mouse model of cancer. Metastases and a rare subset of primary tumors shared a distinct miR signature, implicating a discrete lineage for metastatic tumors. The miR-200 family is strongly down-regulated in metastases and met-like primary tumors, thereby relieving repression of the mesenchymal transcription factor Zeb1, which in turn suppresses E-cadherin. Treatment with a clinically approved angiogenesis inhibitor normalized angiogenic signature miRs in primary tumors, while altering expression of metastatic signature miRs similarly to liver metastases, suggesting their involvement in adaptive resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy via enhanced metastasis. Many of the miR changes associated with specific stages and hallmark capabilities in the mouse model are similarly altered in human tumors, including cognate pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, implying a generality.