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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Semanti Mukherjee
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Semanti Mukherjee wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Prospective Evaluation of Germline Alterations in Patients With Exocrine Pancreatic Neoplasms. 2018

Lowery, Maeve A / Wong, Winston / Jordan, Emmet J / Lee, Jonathan W / Kemel, Yelena / Vijai, Joseph / Mandelker, Diana / Zehir, Ahmet / Capanu, Marinela / Salo-Mullen, Erin / Arnold, Angela G / Yu, Kenneth H / Varghese, Anna M / Kelsen, David P / Brenner, Robin / Kaufmann, Erica / Ravichandran, Vignesh / Mukherjee, Semanti / Berger, Michael F / Hyman, David M / Klimstra, David S / Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K / Tjan, Catherine / Covington, Christina / Maynard, Hannah / Allen, Peter J / Askan, Gokce / Leach, Steven D / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Robson, Mark E / Offit, Kenneth / Stadler, Zsofia K / O'Reilly, Eileen M. ·Department of Medicine. · David M. Rubenstein Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research. · Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell. · Robert and Kate Niehaus Center for Inherited Genomics. · Center for Molecular Oncology. · Department of Pathology. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. · Department of Surgery. ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #29506128.

ABSTRACT: Background: Identification of pathogenic germline alterations (PGAs) has important clinical and therapeutic implications in pancreas cancer. We performed comprehensive germline testing (GT) in an unselected prospective cohort of patients with exocrine pancreatic neoplasms with genotype and phenotype association to facilitate identification of prognostic and/or predictive biomarkers and examine potential therapeutic implications. Methods: Six hundred fifteen unselected patients with exocrine pancreatic neoplasms were prospectively consented for somatic tumor and matched sample profiling for 410-468 genes. GT for PGAs in 76 genes associated with cancer susceptibility was performed in an "identified" manner in 356 (57.9%) patients and in an "anonymized" manner in 259 (42.1%) patients, using an institutional review board-approved protocol. Detailed clinical and pathological features, response to platinum, and overall survival (OS) were collected for the identified cohort. OS was analyzed with Kaplan-Meier curves. Results: PGAs were present in 122 (19.8%) of 615 patients involving 24 different genes, including BRCA1/2, ATM, PALB2, and multiple additional genes associated with the DNA damage response pathway. Of 122 patients with germline alterations, 41.8% did not meet current guidelines for GT. The difference in median OS was not statistically significant between patients with and without PGA (50.8 months, 95% confidence interval = 34.5 to not reached, two-sided P = .94). Loss of heterozygosity was found in 60.0% of BRCA1/2. Conclusions: PGAs frequently occur in pancreas exocrine neoplasms and involve multiple genes beyond those previously associated with hereditary pancreatic cancer. These PGAs are therapeutically actionable in about 5% to 10% of patients. These data support routinely offering GT in all pancreatic ductal adenocarcimona patients with a broad panel of known hereditary cancer predisposition genes.

2 Article Genome-wide analysis of the role of copy-number variation in pancreatic cancer risk. 2014

Willis, Jason A / Mukherjee, Semanti / Orlow, Irene / Viale, Agnes / Offit, Kenneth / Kurtz, Robert C / Olson, Sara H / Klein, Robert J. ·Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center New York, NY, USA ; Program in Cancer Biology and Genetics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center New York, NY, USA. · Program in Cancer Biology and Genetics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center New York, NY, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center New York, NY, USA. · Genomics Core Laboratory, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center New York, NY, USA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center New York, NY, USA. ·Front Genet · Pubmed #24592275.

ABSTRACT: Although family history is a risk factor for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, much of the genetic etiology of this disease remains unknown. While genome-wide association studies have identified some common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with pancreatic cancer risk, these SNPs do not explain all the heritability of this disease. We hypothesized that copy number variation (CNVs) in the genome may play a role in genetic predisposition to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Here, we report a genome-wide analysis of CNVs in a small hospital-based, European ancestry cohort of pancreatic cancer cases and controls. Germline CNV discovery was performed using the Illumina Human CNV370 platform in 223 pancreatic cancer cases (both sporadic and familial) and 169 controls. Following stringent quality control, we asked if global CNV burden was a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Finally, we performed in silico CNV genotyping and association testing to discover novel CNV risk loci. When we examined the global CNV burden, we found no strong evidence that CNV burden plays a role in pancreatic cancer risk either overall or specifically in individuals with a family history of the disease. Similarly, we saw no significant evidence that any particular CNV is associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Taken together, these data suggest that CNVs do not contribute substantially to the genetic etiology of pancreatic cancer, though the results are tempered by small sample size and large experimental variability inherent in array-based CNV studies.

3 Article A replication study and genome-wide scan of single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with pancreatic cancer risk and overall survival. 2012

Willis, Jason A / Olson, Sara H / Orlow, Irene / Mukherjee, Semanti / McWilliams, Robert R / Kurtz, Robert C / Klein, Robert J. ·Program in Cancer Biology and Genetics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #22665904.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To explore the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) on pancreatic cancer risk and overall survival (OS). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The germ line DNA of 531 pancreatic cancer cases and 305 healthy controls from a hospital-based study was genotyped at SNPs previously reported to be associated with pancreatic cancer risk or clinical outcome. We analyzed putative risk SNPs for replication of their reported effects on risk and tested for novel effects on OS. Similarly, we analyzed putative survival-associated SNPs for replication of their reported effects on OS and tested for novel effects on risk. Finally, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of OS using a subset of 252 cases, with two subsequent validation sets of 261 and 572 patients, respectively. RESULTS: Among seven risk SNPs analyzed, two (rs505922 and rs9543325) were associated with risk (P < 0.05). Among 24 survival-associated SNPs analyzed, one (rs9350) was associated with OS (P < 0.05). No putative risk SNPs or putative survival-associated SNPs were found to be associated with OS or risk, respectively. Furthermore, our GWAS identified a novel SNP [rs1482426, combined stage I and II, P = 1.7 × 10(-6), per-allele HR, 1.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.38-2.18] to be putatively associated with OS. CONCLUSIONS: The effects of SNPs on pancreatic cancer risk and OS were replicated in our study, although further work is necessary to understand the functional mechanisms underlying these effects. More importantly, the putative association with OS identified by GWAS suggests that GWAS may be useful in identifying SNPs associated with clinical outcome in pancreatic cancer.

4 Article Including additional controls from public databases improves the power of a genome-wide association study. 2011

Mukherjee, Semanti / Simon, Jennifer / Bayuga, Sharon / Ludwig, Emmy / Yoo, Sarah / Orlow, Irene / Viale, Agnes / Offit, Kenneth / Kurtz, Robert C / Olson, Sara H / Klein, Robert J. ·Gerstner Sloan-Kettering Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. ·Hum Hered · Pubmed #21849791.

ABSTRACT: Though genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous susceptibility loci for common diseases, their use is limited due to the expense of genotyping large cohorts of individuals. One potential solution is to use 'additional controls', or genotype data from control individuals deposited in public repositories. While this approach has been used by several groups, the genetically heterogeneous nature of the population of the United States makes this approach potentially problematic. We empirically investigated the utility of this approach in a US-based GWAS. In a small GWAS of pancreatic cancer in New York, we observed clear population structure differences relative to controls from the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP). When we conduct the GWAS using these additional controls, we find large inflation of the test statistic that is properly corrected by using eigenvectors from principal components analysis as covariates. To deal with errors introduced due to different sources, we propose simultaneously genotyping a small number of controls along with cases and then comparing this group to the additional controls. We show that removing SNPs that show differences between these control groups reduces false-positive findings. Thus, through an empirical approach, this report provides practical guidance for using additional controls from publicly available datasets.