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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Beatrice Mohelnikova-Duchonova
Based on 20 articles published since 2010
(Why 20 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, B. Mohelnikova-Duchonova wrote the following 20 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Different clinical presentations of metachronous pulmonary metastases after resection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: Retrospective study and review of the literature. 2017

Lovecek, Martin / Skalicky, Pavel / Chudacek, Josef / Szkorupa, Marek / Svebisova, Hana / Lemstrova, Radmila / Ehrmann, Jiri / Melichar, Bohuslav / Yogeswara, Tharani / Klos, Dusan / Vrba, Radek / Havlik, Roman / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice. ·Department of Surgery I, University Hospital Olomouc and Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University, 77520 Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Oncology, University Hospital Olomouc and Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University, 77520 Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Molecular Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc, University Hospital Olomouc, 77520 Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc, University Hospital Olomouc, 77520 Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery I, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University, 775220 Olomouc, Czech Republic. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #29085191.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To analyze pancreatic cancer patients who developed metachronous pulmonary metastases (MPM) as a first site of recurrence after the curative-intent surgery. METHODS: One-hundred-fifty-nine consecutive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients who underwent radical pancreatic surgery between 2006 and 2013 were included in this retrospective analysis. The clinical data including age, sex, grade, primary tumor location, pTNM stage, lymph node infiltration, microangioinvasion, perineural invasion, lymphovascular invasion, the therapy administered, and follow-up were all obtained from medical records. Further analysis covered only patients with metachronous metastases. Clinical and histopathological data (age, sex, grade, primary tumor location, pTNM stage, lymph node infiltration, microangioinvasion, perineural invasion, lymphovascular invasion, the therapy administered and follow-up) of patients with metachronous non-pulmonary metastases and patients with metachronous pulmonary metastases were statistically assessed. Disease-free survival (DFS) from pancreas resection until metastases onset and overall survival (OS) were calculated. Wilcoxon test, χ RESULTS: Metachronous pulmonary metastases were observed in 20 (16.9%) and were operable in 3 (2.5%) of PDAC patients after a prior curative-intent surgery. Patients with isolated pulmonary metastases (oligometastases and multiple metastases) had estimated prior DFS and OS of 35.4 and 81.4 mo, respectively, and those with metachronous pulmonary metastases accompanied by other metastases had prior DFS and OS of 17.3 and 23.4 mo, respectively. Patients with non-pulmonary metastases had prior DFS and OS of 9.4 and 15.8 mo, respectively. Different clinical scenarios according to the presentation of MPM were observed and patients could be divided to three subgroups with different prognosis which could be used for the selection of treatment strategy: isolated pulmonary oligometastases, isolated multiple pulmonary metastases and pulmonary metastases accompanied by other metastases. CONCLUSION: Surgery should be considered for all patients with isolated pulmonary oligometastases, but the risk of intervention has to be individually weighted for each patient.

2 Review Therapeutic potential of taxanes in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer. 2016

Lemstrova, Radmila / Melichar, Bohuslav / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice. ·Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, IP Pavlova 6, 775 20, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, IP Pavlova 6, 775 20, Olomouc, Czech Republic. mohelnikova@szu.cz. · Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. mohelnikova@szu.cz. ·Cancer Chemother Pharmacol · Pubmed #27250969.

ABSTRACT: Most patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) present with unresectable or metastatic disease with very poor prognosis. Chemotherapy is the primary treatment modality for patients with locally advanced and metastatic PDAC, but the efficacy of currently available regimens is limited. Taxanes are widely used in many primary cancers including breast, ovarian and lung cancers. The activity of combined regimen of taxanes plus nucleoside analogue or platinum derivate in terms of response rate ranges between 20 and 57 % in PDAC and may prolong overall survival. Since 2013 nab-paclitaxel (paclitaxel-albumin-bound particles) became a new treatment option for patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer based on the results of MPACT trial. Moreover, encouraging activity in PDAC of the combination regimen of paclitaxel and carboplatin that is being widely used in other solid tumors has been reported recently. Biomarkers, including biomarkers predictive of taxane resistance, could allow individualized tailored therapy. BRCA mutation status could serve as predictor of better chemotherapy treatment outcome in PDAC. The present review summarizes the principal clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of taxanes both as monotherapy and in combination in view of the potential use in the treatment of PDAC.

3 Review Role of solute carrier transporters in pancreatic cancer: a review. 2014

Lemstrová, Radmila / Souček, Pavel / Melichar, Bohuslav / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice. ·Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School & Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. ·Pharmacogenomics · Pubmed #25084206.

ABSTRACT: Nucleoside analogs such as gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil are currently the cornerstone of chemotherapy in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Decreased drug transport into tumor cells that may be caused by low expression of membrane proteins, such as solute carrier transporters, represents one of the principal mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance. Individual diversity of multidrug resistance is the major challenge limiting the success of anticancer treatment. Novel biomarkers and pharmacogenomic approaches could further optimize treatment algorithms leading to better survival and lower treatment toxicity in PDAC patients. In this review, the most promising predictive biomarkers from the solute carrier transporter family of membrane transporters and the potential applications for PDAC therapy with nucleoside analogues are summarized.

4 Review [The role of membrane transporters in cellular resistance of pancreatic carcinoma to gemcitabine]. 2010

Mohelníková-Duchonová, B / Soucek, P. ·Laboratore toxikogenomiky, Státní zdravotní ustav, Praha. mohelnikova@szu.cz ·Klin Onkol · Pubmed #21061681.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUNDS: Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the most serious forms of cancer, with a very high mortality rate, and is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the Czech Republic. The etiology and molecular pathogenesis of the disease is still poorly understood. Gemcitabine is a cytotoxic nucleoside analog, which is widely used in the treatment of malignancies, and in particular in pancreatic carcinoma. Interindividual differences in gemcitabine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have been demonstrated, which can significantly influence the outcome of the therapy in thus treated patients. Resistance developed to nucleoside analogs limits their clinical use, just like in the case of any other cytostatics. AIM: This review summarizes available data concerning the membrane proteins involved in the transport mechanism of gemcitabine through cellular membrane, and their role in the cellular resistance of pancreatic carcinoma to gemcitabine.

5 Article Germline BRCA2 K3326X and CHEK2 I157T mutations increase risk for sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2019

Obazee, O / Archibugi, L / Andriulli, A / Soucek, P / Małecka-Panas, E / Ivanauskas, A / Johnson, T / Gazouli, M / Pausch, T / Lawlor, R T / Cavestro, G M / Milanetto, A C / Di Leo, M / Pasquali, C / Hegyi, P / Szentesi, A / Radu, C E / Gheorghe, C / Theodoropoulos, G E / Bergmann, F / Brenner, H / Vodickova, L / Katzke, V / Campa, D / Strobel, O / Kaiser, J / Pezzilli, R / Federici, F / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, B / Boggi, U / Lemstrova, R / Johansen, J S / Bojesen, S E / Chen, I / Jensen, B V / Capurso, G / Pazienza, V / Dervenis, C / Sperti, C / Mambrini, A / Hackert, T / Kaaks, R / Basso, D / Talar-Wojnarowska, R / Maiello, E / Izbicki, J R / Cuk, K / Saum, K U / Cantore, M / Kupcinskas, J / Palmieri, O / Delle Fave, G / Landi, S / Salvia, R / Fogar, P / Vashist, Y K / Scarpa, A / Vodicka, P / Tjaden, C / Iskierka-Jazdzewska, E / Canzian, F. ·Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Pancreatic Disorders Clinic, S. Andrea Hospital, University of Sapienza, Rome, Italy. · Pancreatico/Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Oncology, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Centre, Faculty of Medicine in Plzen, Charles University in Prague, Plzen, Czech Republic. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Heidelberg, Germany. · ARC-Net, Applied Research on Cancer Centre, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute for Translational Medicine and 1st Department of Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary. · Fundeni Clinical Institute, Bucharest, Romania. · First Propaedeutic Surgical Department, "Hippocratio" General Hospital Athens Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Pathologisches Institut der Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague and Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Dipartimento di Biologia, Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Massa Carrara Oncological, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Carrara, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, Konstantopouleion General Hospital of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Section for Visceral Surgery, Department of Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Science, Prague and Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30672594.

ABSTRACT: Rare truncating BRCA2 K3326X (rs11571833) and pathogenic CHEK2 I157T (rs17879961) variants have previously been implicated in familial pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but not in sporadic cases. The effect of both mutations in important DNA repair genes on sporadic PDAC risk may shed light on the genetic architecture of this disease. Both mutations were genotyped in germline DNA from 2,935 sporadic PDAC cases and 5,626 control subjects within the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. Risk estimates were evaluated using multivariate unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for possible confounders such as sex, age and country of origin. Statistical analyses were two-sided with p values <0.05 considered significant. K3326X and I157T were associated with increased risk of developing sporadic PDAC (odds ratio (OR

6 Article Genetic determinants of telomere length and risk of pancreatic cancer: A PANDoRA study. 2019

Campa, Daniele / Matarazzi, Martina / Greenhalf, William / Bijlsma, Maarten / Saum, Kai-Uwe / Pasquali, Claudio / van Laarhoven, Hanneke / Szentesi, Andrea / Federici, Francesca / Vodicka, Pavel / Funel, Niccola / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Vodickova, Ludmila / Basso, Daniela / Obazee, Ofure / Hackert, Thilo / Soucek, Pavel / Cuk, Katarina / Kaiser, Jörg / Sperti, Cosimo / Lovecek, Martin / Capurso, Gabriele / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Khaw, Kay-Tee / König, Anna-Katharina / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kaaks, Rudolf / Bambi, Franco / Archibugi, Livia / Mambrini, Andrea / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Landi, Stefano / Hegyi, Péter / Izbicki, Jakob R / Gioffreda, Domenica / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Tavano, Francesca / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Key, Timothy J / Fave, Gianfranco Delle / Strobel, Oliver / Jonaitis, Laimas / Andriulli, Angelo / Lawlor, Rita T / Pirozzi, Felice / Katzke, Verena / Valsuani, Chiara / Vashist, Yogesh K / Brenner, Hermann / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute for Translational Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary. · First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Italy. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Third Surgical Clinic - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery I, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University, Rome, Italy. · PancreatoBiliary Endoscopy and EUS Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Institute of Molecular and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · MTA-SZTE Momentum Translational Gastroenterology Research Group, Szeged, Hungary. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Molecular Biology Lab, IRCCS Ospedale Casa Sollievo Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · ARC-NET, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Abdominal Surgery, IRCCS Ospedale Casa Sollievo Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30325019.

ABSTRACT: Telomere deregulation is a hallmark of cancer. Telomere length measured in lymphocytes (LTL) has been shown to be a risk marker for several cancers. For pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) consensus is lacking whether risk is associated with long or short telomeres. Mendelian randomization approaches have shown that a score built from SNPs associated with LTL could be used as a robust risk marker. We explored this approach in a large scale study within the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. We analyzed 10 SNPs (ZNF676-rs409627, TERT-rs2736100, CTC1-rs3027234, DHX35-rs6028466, PXK-rs6772228, NAF1-rs7675998, ZNF208-rs8105767, OBFC1-rs9420907, ACYP2-rs11125529 and TERC-rs10936599) alone and combined in a LTL genetic score ("teloscore", which explains 2.2% of the telomere variability) in relation to PDAC risk in 2,374 cases and 4,326 controls. We identified several associations with PDAC risk, among which the strongest were with the TERT-rs2736100 SNP (OR = 1.54; 95%CI 1.35-1.76; p = 1.54 × 10

7 Article Do pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis share the same genetic risk factors? A PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium investigation. 2018

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Capurso, Gabriele / Hackert, Thilo / Di Leo, Milena / Izbicki, Jakob R / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Gioffreda, Domenica / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Pasquali, Claudio / Macinga, Peter / Kaaks, Rudolf / Stigliano, Serena / Peeters, Petra H / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Vodicka, Pavel / Valente, Roberto / Vashist, Yogesh K / Salvia, Roberto / Papaconstantinou, Ioannis / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Valsuani, Chiara / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Gazouli, Maria / Valantiene, Irena / Niesen, Willem / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Hara, Kazuo / Soucek, Pavel / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Johnson, Theron / Brenner, Herman / Tavano, Francesca / Fogar, Paola / Ito, Hidemi / Sperti, Cosimo / Butterbach, Katja / Latiano, Anna / Andriulli, Angelo / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Busch, Olivier R C / Dijk, Frederike / Greenhalf, William / Matsuo, Keitaro / Lombardo, Carlo / Strobel, Oliver / König, Anna-Katharina / Cuk, Katarina / Strothmann, Hendrik / Katzke, Verena / Cantore, Maurizio / Mambrini, Andrea / Oliverius, Martin / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Landi, Stefano / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Sciences and Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Visceral Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Second Department of Surgery, Aretaieion Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Massa and Carrara, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Epidemiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Institute for Health Research, Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28913878.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a very aggressive tumor with a five-year survival of less than 6%. Chronic pancreatitis (CP), an inflammatory process in of the pancreas, is a strong risk factor for PDAC. Several genetic polymorphisms have been discovered as susceptibility loci for both CP and PDAC. Since CP and PDAC share a consistent number of epidemiologic risk factors, the aim of this study was to investigate whether specific CP risk loci also contribute to PDAC susceptibility. We selected five common SNPs (rs11988997, rs379742, rs10273639, rs2995271 and rs12688220) that were identified as susceptibility markers for CP and analyzed them in 2,914 PDAC cases, 356 CP cases and 5,596 controls retrospectively collected in the context of the international PANDoRA consortium. We found a weak association between the minor allele of the PRSS1-PRSS2-rs10273639 and an increased risk of developing PDAC (OR

8 Article SLC22A3 polymorphisms do not modify pancreatic cancer risk, but may influence overall patient survival. 2017

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Strouhal, Ondrej / Hughes, David J / Holcatova, Ivana / Oliverius, Martin / Kala, Zdenek / Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Sperti, Cosimo / Federico Zambon, Carlo / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Fogar, Paola / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Capurso, Gabriele / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Valente, Roberto / Gazouli, Maria / Malleo, Giuseppe / Teresa Lawlor, Rita / Strobel, Oliver / Hackert, Thilo / Giese, Nathalia / Vodicka, Pavel / Vodickova, Ludmila / Landi, Stefano / Tavano, Francesca / Gioffreda, Domenica / Piepoli, Ada / Pazienza, Valerio / Mambrini, Andrea / Pedata, Mariangela / Cantore, Maurizio / Bambi, Franco / Ermini, Stefano / Funel, Niccola / Lemstrova, Radmila / Soucek, Pavel. ·Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Physiology &Centre for Systems Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Transplantation Surgery, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, The University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Brno Bohunice, Czech Republic. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Digestive Diseases, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Italy. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Italy. · Clinica Chirurgica 4, University of Padova, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · ARC-NET Applied research on Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic and First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. · Biomedical Centre, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Azienda USL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Blood Transfusion Service, Children's Hospital Meyer, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria, Florence, Italy. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #28272475.

ABSTRACT: Expression of the solute carrier (SLC) transporter SLC22A3 gene is associated with overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients. This study tested whether genetic variability in SLC22A3 associates with pancreatic cancer risk and prognosis. Twenty four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the SLC22A3 gene sequence and regulatory elements were selected for analysis. Of these, 22 were successfully evaluated in the discovery phase while six significant or suggestive variants entered the validation phase, comprising a total study number of 1,518 cases and 3,908 controls. In the discovery phase, rs2504938, rs9364554, and rs2457571 SNPs were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Moreover, rs7758229 associated with the presence of distant metastases, while rs512077 and rs2504956 correlated with overall survival of patients. Although replicated, the association for rs9364554 did not pass multiple testing corrections in the validation phase. Contrary to the discovery stage, rs2504938 associated with survival in the validation cohort, which was more pronounced in stage IV patients. In conclusion, common variation in the SLC22A3 gene is unlikely to significantly contribute to pancreatic cancer risk. The rs2504938 SNP in SLC22A3 significantly associates with an unfavorable prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients. Further investigation of this SNP effect on the molecular and clinical phenotype is warranted.

9 Article Hedgehog pathway overexpression in pancreatic cancer is abrogated by new-generation taxoid SB-T-1216. 2017

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, B / Kocik, M / Duchonova, B / Brynychova, V / Oliverius, M / Hlavsa, J / Honsova, E / Mazanec, J / Kala, Z / Ojima, I / Hughes, D J / Doherty, J E / Murray, H A / Crockard, M A / Lemstrova, R / Soucek, P. ·Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Transplantation Surgery, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital and Medical Faculty, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · Department of Clinical and Transplantation Pathology, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Pathology, University Hospital and Medical Faculty, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · Institute of Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, USA. · Department of Physiology &Centre for Systems Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland. · Randox Laboratories, Crumlin, UK. ·Pharmacogenomics J · Pubmed #27573236.

ABSTRACT: The Hedgehog pathway is one of the major driver pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. This study investigated prognostic importance of Hedgehog signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer patients who underwent a radical resection. Tumors and adjacent non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues were obtained from 45 patients with histologically verified pancreatic cancer. The effect of experimental taxane chemotherapy on the expression of Hedgehog pathway was evaluated in vivo using a mouse xenograft model prepared using pancreatic cancer cell line Paca-44. Mice were treated by experimental Stony Brook Taxane SB-T-1216. The transcript profile of 34 Hedgehog pathway genes in patients and xenografts was assessed using quantitative PCR. The Hedgehog pathway was strongly overexpressed in pancreatic tumors and upregulation of SHH, IHH, HHAT and PTCH1 was associated with a trend toward decreased patient survival. No association of Hedgehog pathway expression with KRAS mutation status was found in tumors. Sonic hedgehog ligand was overexpressed, but all other downstream genes were downregulated by SB-T-1216 treatment in vivo. Suppression of HH pathway expression in vivo by taxane-based chemotherapy suggests a new mechanism of action for treatment of this aggressive tumor.

10 Article Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms within the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B region affect pancreatic cancer risk. 2016

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Gentiluomo, Manuel / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Neoptolemos, John P / Niesen, Willem / Vodicka, Pavel / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gazouli, Maria / Pacetti, Paola / Di Leo, Milena / Ito, Hidemi / Klüter, Harald / Soucek, Pavel / Corbo, Vincenzo / Yamao, Kenji / Hosono, Satoyo / Kaaks, Rudolf / Vashist, Yogesh / Gioffreda, Domenica / Strobel, Oliver / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Dijk, Frederike / Andriulli, Angelo / Ivanauskas, Audrius / Bugert, Peter / Tavano, Francesca / Vodickova, Ludmila / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Lovecek, Martin / Landi, Stefano / Key, Timothy J / Boggi, Ugo / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Mambrini, Andrea / Bambi, Franco / Busch, Olivier / Pazienza, Valerio / Valente, Roberto / Theodoropoulos, George E / Hackert, Thilo / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Pasquali, Claudio / Basso, Daniela / Sperti, Cosimo / Matsuo, Keitaro / Büchler, Markus / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Izbicki, Jakob / Costello, Eithne / Katzke, Verena / Michalski, Christoph / Stepien, Anna / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Science, Prague, Czech Republic. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Oncological Department Massa Carrara Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Carrara, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg - Hessen gGmbH, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · ARC-Net Research Centre, and Department of Diagnostics and Public Health University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery I, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Unit Nuffield Department of Population Health University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Dant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Colorectal Unit, First Department of Propaedeutic Surgery, Athens Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology-DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Laboratory of Clinical, Transplant Immunology and Genetics, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27486979.

ABSTRACT: The CDKN2A (p16) gene plays a key role in pancreatic cancer etiology. It is one of the most commonly somatically mutated genes in pancreatic cancer, rare germline mutations have been found to be associated with increased risk of developing familiar pancreatic cancer and CDKN2A promoter hyper-methylation has been suggested to play a critical role both in pancreatic cancer onset and prognosis. In addition several unrelated SNPs in the 9p21.3 region, that includes the CDNK2A, CDNK2B and the CDNK2B-AS1 genes, are associated with the development of cancer in various organs. However, association between the common genetic variability in this region and pancreatic cancer risk is not clearly understood. We sought to fill this gap in a case-control study genotyping 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2,857 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients and 6,111 controls in the context of the Pancreatic Disease Research (PANDoRA) consortium. We found that the A allele of the rs3217992 SNP was associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (ORhet=1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.27, p=0.026, ORhom=1.30, 95% CI 1.12-1.51, p=0.00049). This pleiotropic variant is reported to be a mir-SNP that, by changing the binding site of one or more miRNAs, could influence the normal cell cycle progression and in turn increase PDAC risk. In conclusion, we observed a novel association in a pleiotropic region that has been found to be of key relevance in the susceptibility to various types of cancer and diabetes suggesting that the CDKN2A/B locus could represent a genetic link between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk.

11 Article Common variation at 2p13.3, 3q29, 7p13 and 17q25.1 associated with susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. 2015

Childs, Erica J / Mocci, Evelina / Campa, Daniele / Bracci, Paige M / Gallinger, Steven / Goggins, Michael / Li, Donghui / Neale, Rachel E / Olson, Sara H / Scelo, Ghislaine / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Bamlet, William R / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Canzian, Federico / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia M / Chaffee, Kari G / Chanock, Stephen J / Cleary, Sean P / Cotterchio, Michelle / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gazouli, Maria / Hassan, Manal / Herman, Joseph M / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert N / Hung, Rayjean J / Janout, Vladimir / Key, Timothy J / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Stefano / Lu, Lingeng / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Mambrini, Andrea / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Saldia, Amethyst / Scarpa, Aldo / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Strobel, Oliver / Tavano, Francesca / Vashist, Yogesh K / Vodicka, Pavel / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Petersen, Gloria M / Risch, Harvey A / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2] Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Kelvin Grove,Queensland, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. [4] Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Università Vita Salute San Raffaele and Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy. · 1] Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute and Medical Faculty Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, Section of Genetics, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Azienda USL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Liverpool Clinical Trials Unit and Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · ARC-NET-Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #26098869.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the developed world. Both inherited high-penetrance mutations in BRCA2 (ref. 2), ATM, PALB2 (ref. 4), BRCA1 (ref. 5), STK11 (ref. 6), CDKN2A and mismatch-repair genes and low-penetrance loci are associated with increased risk. To identify new risk loci, we performed a genome-wide association study on 9,925 pancreatic cancer cases and 11,569 controls, including 4,164 newly genotyped cases and 3,792 controls in 9 studies from North America, Central Europe and Australia. We identified three newly associated regions: 17q25.1 (LINC00673, rs11655237, odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-1.34, P = 1.42 × 10(-14)), 7p13 (SUGCT, rs17688601, OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.84-0.92, P = 1.41 × 10(-8)) and 3q29 (TP63, rs9854771, OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.85-0.93, P = 2.35 × 10(-8)). We detected significant association at 2p13.3 (ETAA1, rs1486134, OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09-1.19, P = 3.36 × 10(-9)), a region with previous suggestive evidence in Han Chinese. We replicated previously reported associations at 9q34.2 (ABO), 13q22.1 (KLF5), 5p15.33 (TERT and CLPTM1), 13q12.2 (PDX1), 1q32.1 (NR5A2), 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT), 16q23.1 (BCAR1) and 22q12.1 (ZNRF3). Our study identifies new loci associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

12 Article TERT gene harbors multiple variants associated with pancreatic cancer susceptibility. 2015

Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Pacetti, Paola / Vodicka, Pavel / Cleary, Sean P / Capurso, Gabriele / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Werner, Jens / Gazouli, Maria / Butterbach, Katja / Ivanauskas, Audrius / Giese, Nathalia / Petersen, Gloria M / Fogar, Paola / Wang, Zhaoming / Bassi, Claudio / Ryska, Miroslav / Theodoropoulos, George E / Kooperberg, Charles / Li, Donghui / Greenhalf, William / Pasquali, Claudio / Hackert, Thilo / Fuchs, Charles S / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Sperti, Cosimo / Funel, Niccola / Dieffenbach, Aida Karina / Wareham, Nicholas J / Buring, Julie / Holcátová, Ivana / Costello, Eithne / Zambon, Carlo-Federico / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Risch, Harvey A / Kraft, Peter / Bracci, Paige M / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Hartge, Patricia / Strobel, Oliver / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Visvanathan, Kala / Arslan, Alan A / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Souček, Pavel / Gioffreda, Domenica / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Scarpa, Aldo / Mambrini, Andrea / Jacobs, Eric J / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Klein, Alison / Tavano, Francesca / Bambi, Franco / Landi, Stefano / Austin, Melissa A / Vodickova, Ludmila / Brenner, Hermann / Chanock, Stephen J / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Piepoli, Ada / Cantore, Maurizio / Zheng, Wei / Wolpin, Brian M / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Canzian, Federico. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Basic Medical Science, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Surgical and Oncological Department, Pancreas Institute - University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Second Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Central Military Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic. · 1st Department of Propaedeutic Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology (DISCOG), University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital in Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Divisions of Preventive Medicine and Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. · Division of Epidemiology, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Environmental Medicine, and Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. · Surgical Clinic 4, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo Della Sofferenza,", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. · Department of Medicine and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #25940397.

ABSTRACT: A small number of common susceptibility loci have been identified for pancreatic cancer, one of which is marked by rs401681 in the TERT-CLPTM1L gene region on chromosome 5p15.33. Because this region is characterized by low linkage disequilibrium, we sought to identify whether additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be related to pancreatic cancer risk, independently of rs401681. We performed an in-depth analysis of genetic variability of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and the telomerase RNA component (TERC) genes, in 5,550 subjects with pancreatic cancer and 7,585 controls from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and the PanScan consortia. We identified a significant association between a variant in TERT and pancreatic cancer risk (rs2853677, odds ratio = 0.85; 95% confidence interval = 0.80-0.90, p = 8.3 × 10(-8)). Additional analysis adjusting rs2853677 for rs401681 indicated that the two SNPs are independently associated with pancreatic cancer risk, as suggested by the low linkage disequilibrium between them (r(2) = 0.07, D' = 0.28). Three additional SNPs in TERT reached statistical significance after correction for multiple testing: rs2736100 (p = 3.0 × 10(-5) ), rs4583925 (p = 4.0 × 10(-5) ) and rs2735948 (p = 5.0 × 10(-5) ). In conclusion, we confirmed that the TERT locus is associated with pancreatic cancer risk, possibly through several independent variants.

13 Article Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1): do we really have a new predictive biomarker of chemotherapy outcome in pancreatic cancer patients? 2013

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Melichar, Bohuslav. ·Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic; Biomedical Centre, Faculty of Medicine in Plzen, Charles University in Prague, Plzen, Czech Republic. Electronic address: beatrice.mohelnikova@gmail.com. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #24280569.

ABSTRACT: Although systemic chemotherapy significantly improves the overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients, the prognosis remains extremely poor. The development of a drug resistance, either de novo or induced resistance, significantly limits the effectiveness of chemotherapy. SLC29A1 gene encodes human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) protein that is mediating the transport of nucleotides, both purines and pyrimidines, into the tumor cells. The aim of this mini-review is to summarize the current information concerning the prognostic and predictive role of SLC29A1 transporter (hENT1) expression in pancreatic cancer. Increased expression of SLC29A1 in vitro has been described as a potential critical factor determining the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil, the principal cytotoxic agents used in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. The reports on the relationship between SLC29A1 expression and prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer are currently rather conflicting. However, majority of studies on patients with resected pancreatic cancer have suggested that high SLC29A1expression may be predictive of improved survival in patients treated with gemcitabine. SLC29A1 has not been shown to represent a predictive biomarker for patients treated by 5-fluorouracil. In conclusion, potential prognostic and predictive role of SLC29A1 has been demonstrated for selected subset of patients.

14 Article The association between the expression of solute carrier transporters and the prognosis of pancreatic cancer. 2013

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Brynychova, Veronika / Hlavac, Viktor / Kocik, Matej / Oliverius, Martin / Hlavsa, Jan / Honsova, Eva / Mazanec, Jan / Kala, Zdenek / Melichar, Bohuslav / Soucek, Pavel. ·Toxicogenomics Unit, National Institute of Public Health, Srobarova 48, Prague 10, Czech Republic. D.Beatrice@seznam.cz ·Cancer Chemother Pharmacol · Pubmed #23934321.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of fourteen anticancer drug-relevant solute carrier transporters (SLCs) in pancreatic cancer in the context of clinical-pathological characteristics and the KRAS mutation status of tumors. METHODS: Tumors and non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues were obtained from 32 histologically verified patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The transcript profile of SLCs was assessed using quantitative real-time PCR. KRAS mutations in exon 2 were assessed by high-resolution melting analysis and confirmed by sequencing. RESULTS: SLC22A3 and SLC22A18 were upregulated and SLC22A1, SLC22A2, SLC22A11, SLC28A1, SLC28A3 and SLC29A1 were downregulated when compared with non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues. Moreover, significantly lower levels of SLC22A1, SLC22A11 and SLC29A1 were found in tumors with angioinvasion. There was also a significantly higher transcript level of SLC28A1 in tumors with regional lymph nodes affected by metastasis. The study found that a high expression of SLC28A1 was significantly associated with poor overall survival in unselected patients. In contrast, a high expression of SLC22A3 or SLC29A3 was significantly associated with longer overall survival in patients treated with nucleoside analogs. Protein expression of SLC22A1, SLC22A3 and SLC29A3 in tumor tissues of patients with pancreatic carcinoma was observed by immunoblotting for the first time. Finally, SLC levels were not found to be associated with KRAS mutation status in exon 2. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified a number of associations of transcript levels of SLCs with prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients.

15 Article Differences in transcript levels of ABC transporters between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and nonneoplastic tissues. 2013

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Brynychova, Veronika / Oliverius, Martin / Honsova, Eva / Kala, Zdenek / Muckova, Katarina / Soucek, Pavel. ·Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. mohelnikova@szu.cz ·Pancreas · Pubmed #23462326.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate transcript levels of all 49 human ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABCs) in one of the most drug-resistant cancers, namely, the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Association of ABCs levels with clinical-pathologic characteristics and KRAS mutation status was followed as well. METHODS: Tumors and adjacent nonneoplastic tissues were obtained from 32 histologically verified PDAC patients. The transcript profile of ABCs was assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction with a relative standard curve. KRAS mutations in exon 2 were assessed by high-resolution melting analysis and sequencing. RESULTS: Most ABCs were deregulated in PDAC and 10 ABCs were associated with clinical-pathologic characteristics. KRAS mutations did not change the global expression profile of ABCs. CONCLUSIONS: The expression of ABC transporters was significantly deregulated in PDAC tumors when compared to nonmalignant tissues. The observed up-regulation of ABCB4, ABCB11, ABCC1, ABCC3, ABCC5, ABCC10, and ABCG2 in tumors may contribute to the generally poor treatment response of PDAC. The up-regulation of ABCA1, ABCA7, and ABCG1 implicates a serious impairment of cellular cholesterol homeostasis in PDAC. On the other hand, the observed down-regulation of ABCA3, ABCC6, ABCC7, and ABCC8 suggests a possible role of stem cells in the development and progression of PDAC.

16 Article ABO blood groups and pancreatic cancer risk and survival: results from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. 2013

Rizzato, Cosmeri / Campa, Daniele / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Soucek, Pavel / Greenhalf, William / Capurso, Gabriele / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Heller, Anette / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Key, Tim J / Bambi, Franco / Landi, Stefano / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Vodickova, Ludmila / Büchler, Markus W / Bugert, Peter / Vodicka, Pavel / Neoptolemos, John P / Werner, Jens / Hoheisel, Jörg D / Bauer, Andrea S / Giese, Nathalia / Canzian, Federico. ·Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. ·Oncol Rep · Pubmed #23403949.

ABSTRACT: There is strong epidemiologic evidence indicating that common genetic variability could be implicated in pancreatic cancer risk and, to date, various loci have been proposed. In particular, there is increasing evidence of the involvement of ABO gene variability and pancreatic cancer risk. In a large multicentric study of 1,028 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases and 2,257 controls in the context of the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium, we investigated the suggested association with increased risk for carriers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) determining the A or B allele in comparison with the O allele, which encodes for a non-functional enzyme. Since glycosyltransferase activity, encoded by ABO, is higher for the A1 variant compared with the A2 variant, we investigated the hypothesis that A1 carriers were at an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. In our analysis, carriers of the A1 were indeed at greater risk of developing the disease. In addition, we investigated the possible influence that genetic variability at the ABO locus may have in pancreatic cancer survival, but we observed no effect in our population.

17 Article Lack of replication of seven pancreatic cancer susceptibility loci identified in two Asian populations. 2013

Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Bauer, Andrea S / Werner, Jens / Capurso, Gabriele / Costello, Eithne / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Gazouli, Maria / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Key, Timothy J / Bambi, Franco / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Heller, Anette / Landi, Stefano / Vodickova, Ludmila / Theodoropoulos, George / Bugert, Peter / Vodicka, Pavel / Hoheisel, Jörg D / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Neoptolemos, John P / Soucek, Pavel / Büchler, Markus W / Giese, Nathalia / Canzian, Federico. ·German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #23250936.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Two recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), conducted, respectively, in a Japanese and in a Chinese population, identified eight novel loci affecting PDAC risk. METHODS: We attempted to replicate the novel loci in a series of PDACs and healthy controls of European ancestry in the context of the newly formed PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. We genotyped seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP): rs12413624, rs1547374, rs372883, rs5768709, rs6464375, rs708224, rs9502893 (one SNP identified in the Chinese GWAS is not polymorphic in Caucasians) in 1,299 PDAC cases and 2,884 controls. We also attempted stratified analysis considering the different stages of the disease and addressed the possible involvement of the selected SNPs on the survival of patients. RESULTS: None of the SNPs were significantly associated with PDAC risk if considering the overall population of the consortium. When stratifying for country of origin, we found that in the Polish subgroup, the G allele of rs372883 was statistically significantly associated with increased risk [OR, 6.40; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.28-17.91]. However, the sample size of the subgroups was rather small; therefore, this result can be due to chance. None of the SNPs was associated with disease progression or survival. CONCLUSIONS: None of the SNPs associated with PDAC risk in two Asian populations were convincingly associated with PDAC risk in individuals of European descent. IMPACT: This study illustrates the importance of evaluation of PDAC risk markers across ethnic groups.

18 Article Evaluation of reference genes and normalization strategy for quantitative real-time PCR in human pancreatic carcinoma. 2012

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Oliverius, Martin / Honsova, Eva / Soucek, Pavel. ·Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. ·Dis Markers · Pubmed #22377737.

ABSTRACT: Histologically verified pairs (n=10) of pancreatic tumors and non-neoplastic tissues were used for quantitative real-time PCR and the stability of 24 reference genes was analyzed with geNorm and NormFinder software. Raw C{q} values correlated with the degree of RNA degradation. This correlation was abolished by normalization to C{q} of 18S endogenous control gene. Both geNorm and NormFinder programs suggested EIF2B1, ELF1, MRPL19, and POP4 as the same most stable genes. We have thus identified suitable reference genes for future expression studies in pancreatic carcinoma. Normalization method reducing the effects of RNA degradation on the quality of results was also developed.

19 Article Superoxide dismutase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate: quinone oxidoreductase polymorphisms and pancreatic cancer risk. 2011

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Marsakova, Lenka / Vrana, David / Holcatova, Ivana / Ryska, Miroslav / Smerhovsky, Zdenek / Slamova, Alena / Schejbalova, Miriam / Soucek, Pavel. ·Toxicogenomics Unit, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #20966810.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Pancreatic carcinoma etiology and molecular pathogenesis is weakly understood. According to the assumption that genetic variation in carcinogen metabolism further modifies the risk of exposure-related cancers, an association of functional polymorphisms in oxidative stress-modifying genes superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2 [Ala16Val, rs4880]), SOD3 (Arg231Gly, rs1799895), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1 [Pro187Ser, rs1800566], and NQO2 (Phe47Leu, rs1143684) with pancreatic cancer risk was studied. METHODS: Polymorphisms were studied by allelic discrimination. RESULTS: In a hospital-based case-control study on 500 individuals (235 cases and 265 controls) of Czech white origin, SOD2, SOD3, NQO1, and NQO2 polymorphisms showed no significant association with pancreatic cancer risk. Major lifestyle factors such as smoking and alcohol, coffee, or tea consumption did not modify the effect of the studied polymorphisms. CONCLUSIONS: The first European study of the SOD2, SOD3, NQO1, and NQO2 roles in pancreatic cancer etiology did not find significant associations. Despite this observation, other populations with different lifestyle(s) may be at risk and should be further studied.

20 Article CHEK2 gene alterations in the forkhead-associated domain, 1100delC and del5395 do not modify the risk of sporadic pancreatic cancer. 2010

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Havranek, Ondrej / Hlavata, Ivona / Foretova, Lenka / Kleibl, Zdenek / Pohlreich, Petr / Soucek, Pavel. ·Toxicogenomics Unit, National Institute of Public Health, Srobarova 48, 100 42, Prague 10, Czech Republic. ·Cancer Epidemiol · Pubmed #20643596.

ABSTRACT: Checkpoint kinase 2 gene (CHEK2) alterations increase risk of several cancer types. We analyzed selected CHEK2 alterations in 270 Czech pancreatic cancer patients and in 683 healthy controls. The pancreatic cancer risk was higher in individuals who inherited rare alterations in CHEK2 region involving forkhead-associated domain other than I157T (OR=5.14; 95% CI=0.94-28.23) but the observed association was non-significant (p=0.057). The most frequent I157T mutation did not alter the pancreatic cancer risk and neither the followed deletion of 5395bp nor c.1100delC were found in any of pancreatic cases. We conclude that the I157T, other alterations in its proximity, del5395 and c.1100delC in CHEK2 do not predispose to pancreatic cancer risk in the Czech population.